Cases reported "Prosthesis Failure"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/90. Thrombosis of mitral valve prosthesis presenting as abdominal pain.

    A 67-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain, anemia, and leukocytosis. Five years previously, the patient had undergone mitral valve replacement with a St. Jude bileaflet mechanical prosthesis. After her admission, echocardiography confirmed an immobile leaflet of the prosthetic valve. At urgent surgery, thrombosis and pannus, obstructing the disc, were found, and the mechanical valve was replaced with a bioprosthesis. The incidence of mitral valve thrombosis is low, ranging from 0.1% to 5.7% per patient per year. patients who receive inadequate anticoagulation, particularly with valve prostheses in the mitral position, have an increased risk for thrombus or pannus formation. Presentation varies, from symptoms of congestive heart failure or systemic embolization, to fever or no symptoms. New or worsening symptoms in a patient with a prosthetic heart valve should raise concerns about prosthetic dysfunction. Aggressive investigation and, if indicated, urgent or emergency surgery for treatment can be lifesaving.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/90. Aortoduodenal fistula: a late complication of intraluminal exclusion of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm.

    During recent years, considerable clinical experience has been gained with endoluminal stent-graft procedures. Several studies have shown promising results up to a period of 4.5 years. However, long-term follow-up studies are still limited. Late endoleaks caused by stent-graft migration, disconnection of single components in modular stent-grafts, and limb thrombosis have been observed as long-term complications. We report a case in which a migrated and kinked bifurcated stent-graft caused an aortoduodenal fistula 20 months after stent-graft insertion. To our knowledge, such a complication has not been reported before.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/90. Recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis: importance of prolonged Doppler echocardiography examination for diagnosis.

    In a 9-month period a 52-year-old woman was admitted on 3 occasions with thrombotic obstruction of a Medtronic Hall aortic valve prosthesis. On the first occasion the diagnosis was clinically obvious; on the second occasion prosthetic valve malfunction was detected fortuitously on Doppler echocardiography; on the third occasion the diagnosis was made after prolonged Doppler echocardiographic examination. The patient was treated with thrombolysis, surgical thrombectomy, and aortic valve re-replacement on the 3 occasions, respectively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/90. Reactions and complications after the implantation of Endobon including morphological examination of explants.

    In the study described here, the integration of hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic implants (Endobon) was investigated. These implants have an interconnecting system of pores and are free from foreign protein. The material is not toxic, genotoxic, nor zytotoxic, and it is biocompatible. The progress of integration was investigated by means of clinical and radiological check-ups. From 10 patients, it was possible to obtain samples for histological analysis during a second operation (e.g., metal explantation). Microscopic examination showed bony integration with newly formed bone in direct contact with the HA ceramic; it also showed osteoblasts and osteoid seams. No second operation took place earlier than 4 months after the first operation, yet even after this relatively short period, bony integration was already evident. Clinical observation (based on x-rays, reports of pain, signs of inflammation) showed that in most cases healing was taking place without complications. More general operational complications such as thrombosis or nerve injury were observed in 4 patients. If the implant is not sufficiently protected from mechanical stress, bony integation will not take place, and the implant may fracture. HA ceramic, with a porosity between 30% and 80%, is not comparable to cortical bone but only to spongy bone. This factor must be taken into account when deciding whether a HA ceramic implant is indicated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/90. Subclavian stents and stent-grafts: cause for concern?

    PURPOSE: To report cases of stent and stent-graft fracture in the subclavian vessels. methods AND RESULTS: Three patients with self-expanding stents of 3 different types in 1 subclavian artery and 2 subclavian veins presented with recurrent symptoms 6 months to 2 years after stenting. All devices showed signs of compression with stent fracture. The covered stent in the subclavian artery was excised. Of the 2 venous patients, 1 was treated with first rib resection and the other refused further treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The subclavian vessels are prone to flexion during movement, and the vessels may be compressed by external structures, including the clavicle and first rib. stents that have not been designed to withstand these forces may be damaged.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021417087682154
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/90. Giant aneurysm of saphenous vein graft to coronary artery compressing the right atrium.

    Aneurysm of reverse aortocoronary saphenous vein graft is a known complication of coronary artery bypass grafting. In this report we present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented 12 years after coronary artery bypass grafting with a giant graft aneurysm of the reverse aortocoronary saphenous vein graft to the right coronary artery, compressing the right atrium. Spiral computed tomography was used to identify the aneurysm measuring 7 x 6 x 7 cm. We also reviewed the English-language literature and found reports of 50 patients with similar aneurysms of which 30 (61%) were identified as true aneurysms and 17 (33%) were identified as pseudoaneurysms. Three patients could not be identified into either group. We reviewed the presenting symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for this rare entity. An understanding of the pathophysiology of reverse aortocoronary saphenous vein graft aneurysm is important to prevent the possibility of aneurysm rupture, embolization, myocardial infarction, or death.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.014991961377508
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/90. Late spontaneous extrusion of a texturized silicone gel mammary implant.

    A case report of late spontaneous extrusion of a 250-cm(3), round, texturized silicone gel mammary implant, 14 months after implantation, is presented. The irregular surface of the implant, the location of the implant pocket, and the absence of the fibrous capsule were responsible for alterations in the skin thickness. In addition, the pressure exerted by the implant against the skin provides for stasis with venous thrombosis at the inferior portion of the breast. The continuous manipulation of the breast over a thin skin with vascular alterations led to the skin perforation with implant extrusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.50337594704215
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/90. Intermittent electromechanical dissociation as an unusual sign of prosthetic valve thrombosis in a patient with prosthetic fibrous ingrowth.

    We describe the echocardiographic features of an unusual hemodynamic phenomenon of intermittent electromechanical dissociation during regular sinus tachycardia in a patient with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis. Thrombolysis with a solution of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator resulted in the disappearance of electromechanical dissociation and was effective in stabilizing the patient's condition. The later discovery of panus covering the valve ring after the lysis of clots confirmed surgery as the definitive treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = thrombosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/90. Crushed stents in benign left brachiocephalic vein stenoses.

    Two hemodialysis patients presenting with left venous arm congestion due to benign catheter-induced stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein were treated by angioplasty and stent placement. External compression of the stents was responsible for rapid recurrence of the symptoms. No osseous or vascular malformation could be identified. Mechanical constraints induced by respiratory chest wall motion and aortic arch flow-related pulsation are proposed to explain this observation. This potential hazard should be considered when stent placement into the left brachiocephalic vein is advocated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.012850252609292
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/90. Stent recanalization of chronic portal vein occlusion in a child.

    An 8-year-old boy with a 21/2 year history of portal hypertension and repeated bleedings from esophageal varices, was referred for treatment. The 3.5-cm-long occlusion of the portal vein was passed and the channel created was stabilized with a balloon-expandable stent; a portosystemic stent-shunt was also created. The portosystemic shunt closed spontaneously within 1 month, while the recanalized segment of the portal vein remained open. The pressure gradient between the intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal vein branches dropped from 17 mmHg to 0 mmHg. The pressure in the portal vein dropped from 30 mmHg to 17 mmHg and the bleedings stopped. The next dilation of the stent was performed 12 months later due to an increased pressure gradient; the gastroesophageal varices disappeared completely. Further dilation of the stent was planned after 2, 4, and 6 years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.017133670145723
keywords = vein
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Prosthesis Failure'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.