Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/12. Septic endarteritis and fatal iliac wall rupture after endovascular stenting of the common iliac artery.

    A 52-year-old female with arterial occlusive disease underwent an uneventful percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and placement of a vascular metallic stent in the left common iliac artery. Ten days later she presented with clinical symptoms of septic endarteritis. Shortly after re-admittance, an emergency laparotomy had to be performed because of an acute retroperitoneal bleeding. rupture of the common iliac artery directly overlaying the penetrating stent was found but control of haemorrhage was of no avail. In this report of a case, septic endarteritis following placement of a vascular metallic stent preceded fatal rupture of the common iliac artery. This up to now unknown constellation requires surgical intervention without undue delay.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/12. aspergillus fumigatus infection in a mega prosthetic total knee arthroplasty: salvage by staged reimplantation with 5-year follow-up.

    Fungal infection after total joint arthroplasty is an extremely serious complication and a challenge to the treating physician. When a fungal infection is compounded by a massive allograft or a metallic segmental replacement of the femur or other long bone, treatment options become increasingly limited and commonly have led to arthrodesis or amputation of the infected limb. We present the first case report of a low-grade osteosarcoma treated with a segmental distal femoral allograft prosthetic composite knee arthroplasty, which was complicated by infection with aspergillus fumigatus. This complication was treated successfully with a staged reimplantation procedure, intravenous amphotericin, and oral fluconazole suppression. At 5 years after reimplantation, the patient has had no evidence of infection, no pain, and excellent range of motion without extensor lag. The knee Society knee score improved from 50 to 100, and the function score improved from 40 to 100 (for both scores, 100 is the maximum).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/12. Distal septic emboli and fatal brachiocephalic artery mycotic pseudoaneurysm as a complication of stenting.

    The use of percutaneous angioplasty with subsequent intravascular metallic stent placement has gained increasing acceptance over the past decade. Infections of these stents appear to be uncommon; however, the rarity of this complication may in part be the result of a lack of availability of long-term follow-up data. A number of examples of infected cardiac and peripheral vascular stents have been reported, often with fatal consequences. Herein, we report a 74-year-old woman who underwent subclavian and brachiocephalic artery angioplasty and stent placement for symptomatic stenoses. Six months after the initial intervention, the patient returned with restenosis of the stents and underwent repeat angioplasty to restore full patency. Two weeks later, the patient was readmitted with generalized malaise and multiple erythematous, macular lesions on the right forearm and hand. blood cultures grew staphylococcus aureus, and a computed tomographic scan of the chest showed a large brachiocephalic artery pseudoaneurysm with surrounding hematoma. Despite prompt surgical intervention, this complication proved ultimately fatal. Infections of metallic endovascular stents are potentially life-threatening complications and must be addressed urgently, including possible surgical intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/12. Spinal fixation device: a 6-year postimplantation study.

    Long-term tissue response to a metal device is described here. The components of a spinal fixation device were removed 6 years after implantation, following the need for revision surgery after a fall. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changes in surface topography of the metal. Examination of the adjacent tissue showed a chronic inflammatory response with occasional metal debris. immunohistochemistry identified the predominant macrophages and abundant neovascularization. The presence of macrophages in tissues adjacent to the implants, in an otherwise asymptomatic person, is noteworthy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/12. Aspergillus infection in the ascending aorta of a patient with aortic and mitral valve prostheses.

    We report the case of implantation of metallic mitral and aortic valve prostheses 6 months earlier, with subsequent multiple embolic episodes. The anatomicopathological examination of the thrombus of the third embolic episode was compatible with Aspergillus sp, which was treated with amphotericin b, followed by oral itraconazole. On the fourth embolism, vegetations were visualized in the ascending aorta on echocardiography and resonance imaging, and the patient underwent replacement of the aortic segment by a Haemashield tube and exploration of the aortic prosthesis, which was preserved, because no signs of endocarditis were found. Four months later, the patient died due to cardiogenic shock secondary to acute myocardial infarction caused by probable coronary embolism and partial dysfunction of the aortic prosthesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/12. Candida infection in a stent inserted for tracheal stenosis after heart lung transplantation.

    Although there are many reports on the use of expandable metallic stents for treating an airway stenosis that develops after heart lung transplantation, complications from using these stents are rarely reported. We experienced a case of Candida infection in a stent that was placed to treat a tracheal stenosis after heart lung transplantation in an 11-year-old girl. The patient had progressive shortness of breath developed from the 5th postoperative week. Chest computed tomography and bronchoscopy revealed a stenosis at the level of the anastomosis. After repeated unsuccessful trials of endoscopic ablation of the granuloma, a Palmaz metallic expandable stent (8 x 30 mm) (Johnson and Johnson Interventional Systems Co, Warren, NJ) was placed, which was followed by immediate relief of the dyspnea. bronchoscopy conducted immediately after the stent placement showed a free floating distal stent end, which needed to be followed up. The patient had been doing well for the next 9 months after stent placement when she again had shortness of breath develop. Endoscopic examination revealed an intraluminally growing fungal mass, which was particularly severe at the distal free edge of the stent. The culture yielded candida albicans. Aggressive antifungal agents and surgical removal of the stent were planned, but the patient died 1 day after admission.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/12. Should an infected Nuss bar be removed?

    BACKGROUND: The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive procedure for correction of pectus excavatum. It involves insertion of a substernal metal bar. A feared complication of any implanted device is infection, which often necessitates removal. The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' experience with infectious complications after the Nuss procedure. methods: From February 2000 to July 2002, 102 patients underwent the Nuss procedure in 2 pediatric surgical centers. In a retrospective way, the files of those patients in whom a postoperative infection developed were studied. RESULTS: Seven patients suffered postoperative infectious complications. Only one bar needed to be removed. CONCLUSION: The authors' experience indicates that there is no need for immediate removal of an infected Nuss bar. Most of these infections can be managed conservatively. However, early antibiotic treatment is warranted to ensure salvage of the bar.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/12. hand-made articulating spacers for infected total knee arthroplasty: a technical note.

    The standard treatment for late infections of knee prostheses is a two-stage reimplantation with a temporary articulating spacer between operations, but there is no universal agreement as to the best type of spacer to be used and surgeons have created modifications according to their technical and economic resources. We describe our modified technique for custom-made articulating spacers. Spacers have evolved from simple monoblock designs made of acrylic cement alone to articulated, modular, complex and expensive designs with different grades of constriction. Many surgeons are reluctant to use these devices because of the costs and the potential risks of inserting metallic or plastic elements into a septic joint. Further refinements for customization of articulating spacers have been attempted (Rand 1993, Goldman et al. 1996). We have found no reports describing a technique for making custom hand-made articulating spacers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/12. corrosion and late infection causing delayed paraparesis after spinal instrumentation.

    A 28-year-old female patient came to our hospital 14 years after surgical correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with a 316L stainless-steel instrumentation. She presented progressive paraparesis during the last 2 months. Plain radiography, computed tomography scan and computed tomography-scan-guided needle biopsy revealed that a metallotic mass penetrated into the spinal canal, causing compression of the spinal cord at the T5-T6 level. The patient's symptoms were related to corrosion of the implant and infection by propionibacterium acnes. Through a posterior approach, the instrumentation was retrieved and the metallotic mass and tissues were excised. Six months after the surgery, the patient is completely asymptomatic. corrosion of stainless-steel implants is a finding more common than supposed. Biocorrosion--or microbially influenced corrosion--is a concept to be taken into account. It is possible that bacteria may modify the rate of corrosion of metals. early diagnosis of corrosion is essential in order to prevent cases like the one we report, and perhaps, as suggested for total hip arthroplasties, metal levels could be useful to monitor spinal implants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/12. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma at the site of hip replacement in association with chronic infection.

    A case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma that developed at the site of an infected metallic implant is presented. The total hip endoprosthesis was composed of a cobalt-chromium alloy. There was a relatively short latency period (less than 2 years) between the initial surgery and the development of malignancy in this patient. The authors urge development of a tumor registry to discover if the association between hip replacement and malignancy is coincidental.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = metal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Prosthesis-Related Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.