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1/24. Infection of a knee prosthesis with Tsukamurella species.

    A 69-year-old woman with a history of multiple infections of a postoperative wound from a knee replacement was diagnosed with an infection with Tsukamurella sp. The infection was treated with a course of vancomycin and pipercillin/tazobactam, followed by a course of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and ethambutol. The patient responded well. This represents the first report of a Tsukamurella infection of an artificial joint.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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2/24. A prosthetic breast implant infected with mycobacterium fortuitum.

    Augmentation mammaplasty is a common operation performed in the united states. Postoperative wound infections are rare, but can be devastating. Most often, bacteria from the normal skin flora cause these infections, but more atypical organisms can lead to similar situations. The authors present a case of a prosthetic breast implant infected with mycobacterium fortuitum after augmentation mammaplasty. The patient, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed so that others may recognize and treat this entity successfully before encountering major complications. Although it is an infrequent occurrence, plastic surgeons, infectious disease specialists, and primary care doctors who may see postoperative wound infections should be aware of this potential pathogen. It is important in any postimplant infection and especially crucial in cases of unresolving or recurrent infections with unusual or even clear drainage. With proper identification through acid-fast smear and culture, multiagent therapy can be initiated early. Additional complications, including implant removal, may thus be avoided.
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ranking = 58.743416092009
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/24. Mucoraceae infections of antibiotic-loaded cement spacers in the treatment of bacterial infections caused by knee arthroplasty.

    Two clinical cases of mycotic infections secondary to knee spacers medicated with antibiotics against bacterial infections are presented. Care must be taken between the first and second stage (when the spacer is in place), and attention must be paid to the management of the surgical wound to avoid secondary contamination.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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4/24. Protracted infection of pacemaker leads with development of large vegetations: three years follow up. Case report.

    A case history of a patient with permanent pacemaker reports inaccurate diagnosis of inflammation at the site of operation wound and a protracted infection of pacemaker leads. Inadequate therapy led to protracted inflammation with the leads fixed in the superior vena cava and the development of large vegetations in the right heart. Finally, the condition was resolved by surgical explantation and long-term antibiotic therapy. This case history describes infectious complications related to the implantation of a permanent pacemaker and the role of echocardiography in diagnosis of vegetations and points out the surgical treatment as a method of choice.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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5/24. Acute pasteurella multocida in total knee arthroplasty.

    Pasturella multocida is a rare cause of joint sepsis in total joint arthroplasty, and all case reports have identified a distant source of infection from an animal bite that has caused potential hematogenous seeding of the prosthesis. We report a case in which no potential distal wound source was found and the only likely etiology was local wound seeding from an old injury. In that injury, a saddle stirrup had caused a severe traumatic soft tissue injury as a horse had rolled over the patient. We draw attention to the fact that this particular bacteria is virulent in producing septic contamination of a total joint prosthesis, and aggressive treatment is indicated when such infection is identified.
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ranking = 2
keywords = wound
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6/24. The infected or exposed breast implant: management and treatment strategies.

    Among the potential complications associated with the use of breast implants are the risks of periprosthetic infection and device extrusion. There is little published information about the effective management of these situations. Conservative recommendations include antibiotic therapy and removal of the implant until resolution of the infection or until the wound has healed. A retrospective review identified patients with periprosthetic infection or threatened or actual device exposure treated by the senior author. Twenty-four patients encompassing 26 affected prostheses were available for review and were classified into seven groups based on initial presentation as follows: group 1, mild infection (n = 8); group 2, severe infection (n = 4); group 3, threatened exposure without infection (n = 3); group 4, threatened exposure with mild infection (n = 3); group 5, threatened exposure with severe infection (n = 1); group 6, actual exposure without clinical infection (n = 5); and group 7, actual exposure with infection (n = 2). To salvage the prosthesis in these patients, various treatment strategies were utilized. All patients with a suspected infection or device exposure were started immediately on appropriate antibiotic therapy (oral antibiotics for mild infections and parenteral antibiotics for severe infections). Salvage methods included one or more of the following: antibiotic therapy, debridement, curettage, pulse lavage, capsulectomy, device exchange, primary closure, and/or flap coverage. Twenty (76.9 percent) of 26 threatened implants with infection or threatened or actual prosthesis exposure were salvaged after aggressive intervention. The presence of severe infection adversely affected the salvage rate in this series. A statistically significant difference exists among those patients without infection or with mild infection only (groups 1, 3, 4, and 6); successful salvage was achieved in 18 (94.7 percent) of 19 patients, whereas only two of seven of those implants with severe infection (groups 2, 5, and 7) were salvaged (p = 0.0017). Ten (90.9 percent) of 11 devices with threatened or actual exposure, not complicated by severe infection (groups 3, 4, and 6), were salvaged. Several treatment strategies were developed for periprosthetic infection and for threatened or actual implant exposure. patients with infection were placed on oral or intravenous antibiotics; those who responded completely required no further treatment. For persistent mild infection or threatened or actual exposure, operative intervention was required, including some or all of the following steps: implant removal, pocket curettage, partial or total capsulectomy, debridement, site change, placement of a new implant, and/or flap coverage; the menu of options varied with the precise circumstances. No immediate salvage was attempted in five cases, due to either severe infection, nonresponding infection with gross purulence, marginal tissues, or lack of options for healthy tissue coverage. Based on the authors' experience, salvage attempts for periprosthetic infection and prosthesis exposure may be successful, except in cases of overwhelming infection or deficient soft-tissue coverage. Although an attempt at implant salvage may be offered to a patient, device removal and delayed reinsertion will always remain a more conservative and predictable option.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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7/24. Knee arthrodesis using circular external fixator in the treatment of infected knee prosthesis: case report.

    A patient (68 years old and male) underwent total knee replacement because of arthrosis, but he subsequently had infection due to a wound problem. Although he underwent early debridement, antibiotherapy, and soft-tissue operation, treatment failed because of improper soft-tissue coverage and progression of the infection. Therefore, the prosthesis was removed and a spacer with antibiotic was placed, in order to provide soft-tissue coverage and to eradicate infection. After 2 months, the patient underwent knee arthrodesis using a circular external fixator to achieve a stable lower extremity and to facilitate return to activities of daily living. We obtained knee fusion at 4 months without any requirement for secondary procedure of soft tissue and bone graft. There was no major complication. arthrodesis with circular external fixator is a reliable and successive method that should be preferred for the treatment of infected knee replacement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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8/24. vacuum-assisted conservative treatment for the management and salvage of exposed prosthetic hemodialysis access.

    Recurrent puncture of dialysis grafts can cause erosion and ulcer formation in the skin over the prosthetic material. Contamination of the wound can lead to infection of the graft, and the necessity to remove it. We describe four cases where agressive treatment with debridement, intravenous antibiotics and negative pressure therapy allowed prosthesis salvage without discontinuation of hemodialysis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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9/24. Successful treatment of infected vascular prosthetic grafts in the groin using conservative therapy with povidone-iodine solution.

    Four cases of infected vascular prosthetic graft in the groin successfully treated with povidone-iodine solution using a conservative approach are described here. In all patients the same technique was used. After complete debridement, the prosthetic graft in the groin was completely exposed. The wound was cleansed with hydrogen peroxide and then dressed with gauze soaked in 1:10 sterile water-diluted povidone-iodine solution. The dressings were changed twice a day. The patients were supplemented by systemic therapy of an appropriate antibiotic. All patients were observed in the intensive care unit. In all patients this treatment method led to control of infection and healing of the wound. Thus, it was not necessary to remove the prosthetic graft and patients were spared a major surgical intervention. At follow-up, the prosthetic grafts remain patent without any signs of recurrence of infection.
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ranking = 2
keywords = wound
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10/24. Infected aortic pseudoaneurysm at the site of a proximal mechanical anastomosic connector following off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: case report.

    We describe a patient who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery performed with an aortic connector. The patient developed a malignant deep sternal wound infection that subsequently led to an aortic pseudoaneurysm at the site of proximal anastomosis.
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ranking = 29.371708046005
keywords = wound infection, wound
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