Cases reported "Proteus Infections"

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11/15. Lens implant cyto-pathology in postoperative Proteus panophthalmitis.

    The reactive membrane on a posterior chamber lens implant removed from an eye with postoperative proteus mirabilis panophthalmitis was found to be based on a continuous proteinaceous capsule exhibiting only very few fibroblast-like cells. Diffusely arranged neutrophils exhibiting evidence of phagocytosis were attached to a delicate fiber network continuous with the processes of fibroblast-like cells. There was also pus and acellular debris loosely covering the outer surface of this capsule.
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keywords = operative
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12/15. Results of bacteriophage treatment of suppurative bacterial infections. III. Detailed evaluation of the results obtained in further 150 cases.

    The results of phage therapy applied in further 150 cases of suppurative bacterial infections were analyzed. Positive therapeutic results were obtained in 137 cases (91.3%). The results obtained confirmed the previous findings on great effectiveness of bacteriophages in the treatment of septic infections, spontaneous or postoperative, caused by pyo genic Staphylococci, klebsiella, escherichia, Proteus and pseudomonas.
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13/15. Postoperative pseudophakic bacterial endophthalmitis.

    Five patients who had postoperative pseudophakic bacterial endophthalmitis were treated with topical, periocular, and systemic antibiotics. Four patients also received intravitreal antibiotics and oral corticosteroids. The causative organisms were staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, and proteus mirabilis. Final visual acuities ranged from 6/7.5 (20/25) to no light perception. Response to treatment and final visual acuity did not appear to be related to retention or removal of the intraocular lens.
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keywords = operative
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14/15. Purulent pericarditis complicating coronary artery bypass.

    We have described the first survivor with Proteus purulent pericarditis after coronary artery bypass. Purulent pericarditis, which must be differentiated from postpericardiotomy syndrome, should be suspected in a patient with fever and pericardial effusion after bypass surgery. pericardiocentesis established the diagnosis of purulent pericarditis. Today, with prophylactic antibiotics being used routinely, purulent pericarditis in the postoperative period may be caused by an aerobic gram-negative bacillus. Treatment consists of surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotics.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = operative
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15/15. Postoperative endophthalmitis resulting from prosthesis contamination in a monocular patient.

    Monocular patients who wear an ocular prosthesis may harbor pathogenic conjunctival flora both in the socket and in the contralateral eye. They may therefore be at increased risk of developing endophthalmitis after intraocular procedures. We studied a monocular, prosthesis-wearing, 86-year-old man who underwent cataract extraction, subtotal transpupillary vitrectomy, and intraocular lens insertion. Fulminant endophthalmitis ensued postoperatively, and despite complete vitrectomy and administration of intraocular antibiotics, the eye lost light perception. Intravitreal as well as conjunctival cultures bilaterally grew proteus mirabilis. The patient disclosed that he cleaned the prosthesis frequently because of discharge. We considered an association between this bacterial colonization and the risk of developing postoperative endophthalmitis and suggest prophylactic measures for treatment of monocular patients undergoing intraocular procedures.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = operative
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