Cases reported "Proteus Infections"

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1/5. Total excision of the sternum and thoracic pedicle transposition of the greater omentum; useful strategems in managing severe mediastinal infection following open heart surgery.

    Mediastinal sepsis following open heart surgery is a significant cause of death. Open drainage of the mediastinumalone was employed originally in management of this problem. More recently, debridement, drainage, and reclosure have been used. Various irrigation solutions, such as antibiotics and Betadine, have been advocated to control severe mediastinal sepsis. Three principles of management in patients unresponsiveness to the above techniques have proved successful in two patients with life-threatening mediastinal sepsis: (1) radical, complete excision of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages; (2) transposition of the greater omentum on a vascular pedicle to the mediastinum; and (3) primary closure with full-thickness rotational skin flaps. The radical excision of the sternum removes residual foci of sepsis in cartilage and sternal bone marrow. The transposition of the omentum provides a highly vascular, rapidly granulating covering for the contaminated great vessels and hase been successfully to prevent recurrence of suture line bleeding of an exposed ascending aortic anastomosis site. Primary closure of the wound with full-thickness skin flaps provides a suprisingly satisfactory covering for the heart. Preoperative and postoperative measurements of ventilatory mechanics have shown relatively small ventilatory impairment after the alteration of the thoracic cage imposed by excision of the sternum. Two patients have returned to active lives. A treatment failure probably due to incomplete adherence to these guidelines also is presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound
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2/5. Protean infectious types and frequent association with neurosurgical procedures in adult serratia marcescens CNS infections: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    serratia marcescens is a rare pathogen of adult central nervous system (CNS) infection. We report on the clinical features and therapeutic outcomes of two adult patients with such infections. The clinical characteristics of 13 other reported adult cases are also included for analysis. The 15 cases were nine males and six females, aged 19-83 years, in whom, underlying post-neurosurgical states and ear operation were noted in 93% (14/15). fever and conscious disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations of these 15 cases, followed by hydrocephalus, seizures, and wound infections. The manifestation types were protean, including meningitis and focal suppurations such as brain abscess, cranial and spinal epidural abscess, cranial subdural abscess, and infected lumbar pseudomeningocele. One case of S. marcescens CNS infection was diagnosed postmortem; the other 14 were diagnosed by the positive culture from CSF or pus. Antibiotic therapy with or without neurosurgical intervention was the management strategy in 14/15 cases. The therapeutic results showed a high mortality rate.
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ranking = 266.32157855942
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/5. Frequent association with neurosurgical conditions in adult proteus mirabilis meningitis: report of five cases.

    adult Proteus (P.) mirabilis meningitis is relatively rare and has not been examined individually in the English-language literature. During a period of 15 years (January 1986-December 2000), four adult patients with P. mirabilis meningitis and one adult patient with mixed bacterial meningitis involving P. mirabilis were identified at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung. These five patients included one man and four women, aged from 19 to 74 years (mean age=55.4). P. mirabilis infection accounted for 1.7% (4/229) of cases of our culture-proven monomicrobial adult bacterial meningitis and was involved in 7.1% (1/14) of cases of our adult mixed bacterial meningitis during this period. Underlying debilitating conditions including diabetes mellitus and neurosurgical disorders were common in these five cases. adult P. mirabilis meningitis had an acute clinical course, with fever and consciousness-disturbance occurring as most prominent clinical manifestations in all patients. Other common manifestations included hydrocephalus, seizure, septic shock and wound infection. Hematogenous spread would appear to be the most likely mechanism. Multi-antibiotic resistant strains of P. mirabilis were not found in our patients. All strains were susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, imipenem, aztreonam and ciprofloxacin. The results of treatment for adult P. mirabilis meningitis were not satisfactory, most of the patients surviving with severe neurological deficit.
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ranking = 266.32157855942
keywords = wound infection, wound
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4/5. proteus penneri urosepsis in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    proteus penneri has been isolated from many different clinical sources, including surgical wound infections, urine, and blood. We describe the first reported case of P. penneri nosocomial urosepsis in a patient with diabetes. P. penneri was subsequently isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a pulmonary artery catheter tip.
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ranking = 266.32157855942
keywords = wound infection, wound
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5/5. Management of animal bite injuries of the face: experience with 94 patients.

    PURPOSE: Because of the large number of bacteria in the oral cavity, animal bite wounds are generally contaminated, and their treatment is difficult because of the risk of infection, especially in extensive injuries. This report describes the management of a large series of patients and recommends treatment guidelines on the basis of the results. patients AND methods: Ninety-four animal bite wounds on the face and head were analyzed according to the type of animal, location and extent of the soft tissue wound, duration and type of surgical treatment, occurrence of infections and their pathogen spectrum, as well as the choice of antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: dogs caused 91% of the bite wounds. Infections developed in 4 of 53 patients who underwent primary wound closure with minor edge excision and prophylactic administration of oral penicillin. Without antibiotic administration, 2 of 15 patients had infections, which were treated on an outpatient basis. Of 26 patients with initially delayed treatment, 18 showed clinical inflammatory symptoms with a wide spectrum of pathogens (escherichia coli, streptococcus, enterococcus, staphylococcus epidermidis, and Proteus) on presentation. CONCLUSION: Extensive animal bite wounds on the face, even with soft tissue defects, should be treated according to the criteria of a esthetic reconstructive facial surgery. In view of the low infection rate, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified.
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ranking = 6
keywords = wound
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