Cases reported "Pseudomonas Infections"

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1/6. A case of bacterial endophthalmitis following perforating injury caused by a cat claw.

    A case of bacterial endophthalmitis following a perforating ocular injury caused by a cat claw is reported. The scleral wound was sutured immediately following the injury and systemic antibiotics were administered. Despite this treatment, endophthalmitis occurred 3 days after the injury. The endophthalmitis was resolved by pars plana vitrectomy, however preretinal reproliferation and retinal detachment subsequently occurred. After reoperation the retina was reattached and the corrected visual acuity improved from 10 cm/HM to 20/200. pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in cultured vitreous humor that was collected during surgery. This case illustrates the possibility of endophthalmitis being caused by gram negative bacillus in cases of perforating injuries caused by animal claws. Perforating ocular injuries caused by animal claws are relatively rare. Here we report a case of endophthalmitis due to pseudomonas aeruginosa that occurred after a perforating injury caused by a cat claw. The eye was treated by pars plana vitrectomy.
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2/6. An epidemic in a coronary care unit caused by Pseudomonas species.

    Five patients in a coronary care unit were involved in an epidemic caused by a nonfermenting Gram-negative bacillus, presumptively identified by our laboratory as Pseudomonas cepacia. All medications administered intravenously to these patients were cultured. Because morphine was the only such medication common to the treatment of all the patients involved, a vial used in the unit at that time was cultured, as were two previously-entered vials of saline solution and several sterile vials of distilled water used in the preparation of injectable medication. The Pseudomonas cepacia organism was recovered from one of the vials of saline solution. The epidemic ended as soon as the practice of re-entering the vials of sterile saline solution was discontinued.
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3/6. pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis in a preterm infant.

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is rare in the neonatal period. It occurs in susceptible individuals such as preterm infants. pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacillus, has been identified as the causative organism in more than 75% of invasive neonatal eye infections. The source may be endogenous; secondary to septicemia or exogenous, including reports of nosocomial infections and those infections arising from the birth canal. We report the case of a preterm infant who developed pseudomonas endophthalmitis, septicemia, and meningitis after a corneal abrasion.
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keywords = bacillus
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4/6. Gram negative aerobic bacillus pneumonia in oral and maxillofacial surgery--a case for comment.

    A case illustrating the potentially fatal complication of endogenous Gram Negative Aerobic bacillus (GNAB) septicaemia secondary to nosocomial pneumonia is presented along with current theories as to its aetiology. The technique of selective decontamination of the digestive tract is designed and advocated to prevent such occurrences; oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of this approach. It may be, however, that by using much simpler manoeuvres such as changes in policy regarding gastric stress ulcer prophylaxis, the already small risk of such an occurrence will be further reduced. awareness of this condition will allow a higher index of suspicion when presented with catastrophic septic complications on the ITU and aid in more rational planning of antimicrobial therapy.
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keywords = bacillus
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5/6. Infections with Pseudomonas paucimobilis: report of four cases and review.

    Pseudomonas paucimobilis (formerly CDC group IIK, biotype 1) is a strictly aerobic, nonfermenting, oxidase- and catalase-positive, gram-negative bacillus that is widely distributed in water and soil. Its name derives from the difficulty encountered in demonstrating its motility, even in liquid media. This microorganism is responsible for two types of infection in humans: sporadic or community-acquired infections, probably of endogenous or environmental origin (bacteremia, meningitis, urinary tract infection, and wound infection); and outbreaks of nosocomial infection associated with the contamination of sterile fluids employed in hospitals. We present four cases of infection caused by P. paucimobilis (two of bacteremia, one of leg ulcer infection, and one of cervical adenitis). The majority of infections produced by P. paucimobilis have a good prognosis; no deaths related to this entity have been reported in the literature. The published results of susceptibility tests suggest that the aminoglycosides (either alone or in combination with a beta-lactam antibiotic) or the quinolone may be the agents of choice in the treatment of these infections.
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6/6. Septicemia caused by Pseudomonas paucimobilis.

    A case of septicemia caused by Pseudomonas paucimobilis is reported. This represents the first definitive case of disease produced by this yellow-pigmented, nonfermentative bacillus.
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