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1/13. A woman with dermatitis and dissociative periods.

    A nineteen year old female with pustular eczema and dissociative spells is presented. The patient has a three year history of severe dermatitis beginning shortly after her marriage. Central dynamic issues appear to be difficulty separating from her mother and an ambivalent identification with a hostile father. The patient also describes fugue-like episodes which occur with emerging aggressive feelings. Psychological testing supported these hypotheses. The relevant literature describing the correlation between aggression and skin disease is reviewed. A final uniform formulation was tentatively proposed that this patient, in addition to a strong genetic component for atopic dermatitis, had her illness abetted by inability to cope with aggressive affects.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fugue
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2/13. Distinguishing features of pseudocomplex partial seizures.

    The authors identify common features in the clinical presentations of three patients whose pseudoseizures mimicked complex partial seizures. All three had suffered the recent traumatic loss of a significant love object, and all manifested unconscious feelings of guilt and the use of defense mechanisms of denial, dissociation, introjection, identification, and symbolization. The authors explore the diagnostic, treatment, and etiological implications of these findings.
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ranking = 0.020957318183672
keywords = dissociation
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3/13. psychosomatic medicine: the divergent legacies of Freud and Janet.

    A series of differing explanations of a puzzling case of psychosomatic illness introduces some reflections on a century's history of psychoanalytic interest in the mind-body problem. Freud and Janet explained the physical symptoms of hysteria using radically different models of the mind. Since then Janet's model, banished early on, has returned to haunt the castle of psychoanalysis. The enduring influence of Janet's model on subsequent thought in this field, especially that of Marty and de M'Uzan, Sifneos, LeDoux, and others, is traced, as is the influence of Freud's model on Groddeck, Alexander, McDougall, Fonagy, and others. It is argued that although these models are vastly different at one level of abstraction, at a higher level they share an important set of assumptions.
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ranking = 3.9451528106518
keywords = hysteria
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4/13. A case of psychogenic fugue: I understand, aber ich verstehe nichts.

    Psychogenic fugue is a disorder of memory that occurs following emotional or psychological trauma and results in a loss of one's personal past including personal identity. This paper reports a case of psychogenic fugue in which the individual lost access not only to his autobiographical memories but also to his native German language. A series of experiments compared his performance on a variety of memory and language tests to several groups of control participants including German-English bilinguals who performed the tasks normally or simulated amnesia for the German language. Neuropsychological, behavioral, electrophysiological and functional neuroimaging tests converged on the conclusion that this individual suffered an episode of psychogenic fugue, during which he lost explicit knowledge of his personal past and his native language. At the same time, he appeared to retain implicit knowledge of autobiographical facts and of the semantic or associative structure of the German language. The patient's poor performance on tests of executive control and reduced activation of frontal compared to parietal brain regions during lexical decision were suggestive of reduced frontal function, consistent with models of psychogenic fugue proposed by Kopelman and Markovitsch.
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ranking = 8
keywords = fugue
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5/13. Psychogenic voice disorders: literature review and case report.

    This paper explores some of the similarities and differences between hysteria and hypochondriasis and suggests that voice disorders are a prototype of disorders which reflect the intricate interplay of emotional, cognitive and physiological functions. speech production requires the involvement of various systems of the body, including the central nervous system, respiratory and vocal systems. Voice disorders can take many different forms and can be caused by a variety of factors. A review of the relevant literature is presented along with a clinical case record of a woman with hysterical dysarthria.
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ranking = 3.9451528106518
keywords = hysteria
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6/13. The unseen tears of children: a Chinese boy who vomited for 14 months.

    A Chinese boy in hong kong who vomited for 14 months after his father had gone abroad to work is reported. Despite the very obvious predicament and sadness, more than 30 doctors had failed to understand the patient. In their search for a disease to explain the symptom, they trapped both themselves and the patient in the symptom of vomiting. It is argued that this patient should have been understood not from the angle of the traditional medical model. Neither was the psychoanalytical model useful. Rather the communication model of hysteria is much more practical; the vomiting can be construed as the unseen tears of a boy entrenched helplessly in his predicament. These unseen and unrecognized tears had cost the patient 14 months of precious life.
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ranking = 3.9451528106518
keywords = hysteria
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7/13. Is it organic or is it functional. Is it hysteria or malingering?

    Conversion hysteria, a common affliction, requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent fixation of the incapacity and secondary contractures, and to protect the patient from unnecessary surgery. Diagnostic and therapeutic principles are outlined.
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ranking = 19.725764053259
keywords = hysteria
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8/13. How are women sicker than men? An overview of psychosomatic problems in women.

    An overview is presented of psychosomatic problems in women - the epidemiology, physiology and psychology. Surveys of sickness rates in women and psychological studies are used as a basis of speculation about higher female morbidity rates. Theories of psychosomatic illness, the somatic concomitants of hysteria and alexithymia are reviewed as they pertain to observations of gender differences in disease phenomena. A clinical case is presented of thyrotoxicosis, one of the illnesses predominantly found in women.
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ranking = 3.9451528106518
keywords = hysteria
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9/13. multiple sclerosis and hysteria. Lessons learned from their association.

    Four patients with organic neurological disease (multiple sclerosis) had additional major hysterical disability. patients with unequivocal organic disease often have coexistent psychological disturbances. The preexisting personality, nature of the organic disease and its disability, and the psychosocial setting interact and create an illness whose components are difficult to separate. In some patients there are definite secondary gains from an illness. The combination of hysteria and multiple sclerosis serves as a model for the coexistence of organic and psychological disorders; it serves as an example of the general questions of how the sick deal with their infirmities and how the physician comprehensively deals with illness.
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ranking = 19.725764053259
keywords = hysteria
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10/13. The great escape: a neuropsychological study of psychogenic amnesia.

    This paper describes the neuropsychological test performance of a patient who experienced a "fugue" episode (functional retrograde amnesia) lasting 7 days, but who continued to complain of a virtually complete loss of autobiographical memory for well over a year. Subsequent evidence revealed that she had been at least partially simulating her amnesia during this prolonged period. Neuropsychological testing took place soon after admission to hospital, at intervals thereafter, and after an Amytal abreaction, which produced a substantial recovery of her memories. On various anterograde tests, designed to detect simulation, the patient's performance was unimpaired, including recognition memory tasks, word-stem completion priming for "neutral" word-lists and for post-onset autobiographical material, and some aspects of semantic memory. However, her pattern of performance on an autobiographical and a remote news Event test differentiated her from patients with organic amnesia, because she showed a grossly disproportionate autobiographical memory loss and an extreme recency effect. In addition, a rating scale, on which she showed impaired feelings-of-knowing for items from her autobiographical memory, suggested simulation. On a word-completion task for pre-onset autobiographical material, she showed absent "priming" relative to "baseline" material. However, following the Amytal abreaction, there was a substantial improvement on this task, relative to recognition and cued recall performance. This finding has been interpreted within an hierarchical model of awareness in memory, derived from studies of normal memory and organic amnesia; and it is suggested that patients with "psychogenic amnesia" may manifest different levels of awareness for differing memories.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fugue
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