Cases reported "Puerperal Infection"

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1/11. Fatal maternal beta-hemolytic group B streptococcal meningitis: a case report.

    meningitis secondary to beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus is rare and represents less than 1% of cases of adult meningitis. We report the first known case of maternal mortality attributed to beta-hemolytic group B streptococcal meningitis. A 23-year-old African-American woman with a benign prenatal course delivered a viable male infant at term. Labor was complicated by thick meconium for which a saline amnioinfusion was utilized. On postpartum Day 1, the patient complained of right hip pain and a headache. Within 12 hr the patient was comatose with fixed and dilated pupils. life support measures were discontinued secondary to absence of electrocortical activity. Postmortem examination revealed endomyometritis and fulminant meningitis with gram-positive cocci. Placental histologic sections demonstrated acute chorioamnionitis and bateriological cultures noted beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus. The virulence of beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus in the neonate is well recognized. This case demonstrates that beta-hemolytic group B streptococcus is also a potentially fatal maternal pathogen.
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2/11. perinatal mortality and maternal mortality at the Provincial Hospital, Quang Ngai, South vietnam, 1967-1970.

    The perinatal mortality, maternal mortality, infant mortality rates, and the complications of delivery at the Provincial Hospital of Quang Ngai, South vietnam are described. The perinatal mortality is the only valid statistic available as the infant usually leaves the hospital within three days of delivery. knowledge pertaining to the 4th to 28th day after birth is scanty and there is insufficient knowledge about the first year of life. infant mortality is estimated at 277 per 1,000 live births. The perinatal mortality 64.6 per 1,000 live births, and maternal mortality, 106 per 10,000 live births are extremely high in contrast to Western countries. The high perinatal mortality is attributable to deaths during birth, the neonatal and immediate postnatal period. The high maternal mortality is primarily due to caesarean section, anemia, uterine rupture, toxemia, post-partum hemorrhage and puerperal infection.
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keywords = perinatal mortality, mortality
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3/11. Two cases of delayed diagnosis of postpartal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    BACKGROUND: Puerperal sepsis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) toxic shock syndrome is associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Luckily it is now rare, but diagnosis is not always easy. This report demonstrates the problem of recognizing this disease, and summarizes the current knowledge on the pathomechanism and management of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. CASE: Two cases of postpartum streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to GAS are described. In both cases the correct diagnosis was delayed for several days. The first patient was sent home with the diagnosis of German measles; the second patient was transferred to our neurological intensive care unit with the diagnosis of meningitis. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit in profound shock, both developed multiple organ failure, and one patient died. CONCLUSIONS: GAS may produce virulence factors that cause host tissue pathology. Besides aggressive modern intensive care treatment, early diagnosis and correct choice of anti-streptococcal antibiotics are crucial. A possible adverse effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents requires confirmation in a multicenter study.
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4/11. Postabortal and postpartum tetanus. A review of 19 cases.

    The occurrence of postabortal and postpartum tetanus over a 7 1/2-year period at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, is reviewed. Of all the women between the ages of 15 years and 50 years who were admitted with tetanus, 34,7% were admitted after abortions. The mortality rate was 15,8%, which appears to be the lowest thus far reported. Possible methods of preventing postabortal tetanus are discussed.
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5/11. Group A streptococcus and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome: a postpartum case report.

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome from group A streptococcal disease is rare in the postpartum period, yet it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. early diagnosis and treatment can lessen complications. Midwives can improve provision of postpartum care by being adequately educated about signs and symptoms of this disease, thereby enhancing their ability to recognize it and obtain the appropriate referral or collaborative medical care. A clinical presentation of postpartum streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, including provider follow-up, is presented.
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6/11. Puerperal group A Streptococcus infection: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Group A Streptococcus (GAS) sepsis is a rare event but carries a high risk of maternal mortality. CASE: A case of puerperal infection occurred with GAS. This patient had had an uneventful prenatal and intrapartum course. She was noted to have high, spiking fevers immediately postpartum, with minimal clinical symptoms. Her blood cultures were positive for GAS, most likely from a urinary tract infection. She was started on broad-coverage antibiotics and defervesced on postpartum day 4. She remained afebrile and was discharged on postpartum day 8. CONCLUSION: patients with puerperal GAS sepsis commonly appear well clinically, with minor somatic complaints. GAS bacteremia should be suspected and promptly treated in women with high, spiking fevers early in the postpartum period. There are currently no guidelines on preventing vertical transmission. It is unclear how a patient with a previous history of GAS should be managed. Prophylactic use of penicillin during future labor may be warranted.
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7/11. Postpartum maternal group B streptococcal meningitis.

    Maternal group B streptococcal (GBS) meningitis is rare, with only four cases previously reported in the literature. In this review a fifth case of postpartum GBS meningitis is presented. The five cases are compared with 34 cases of GBS meningitis in nonparturient adults. All cases of maternal GBS meningitis followed a vaginal delivery. The mean age of patients who had GBS meningitis outside the perinatal setting was 55 years, and most of these individuals had associated illnesses or frank immunosuppression; the mortality rate in this group was 23%. In contrast, all five patients with maternal GBS meningitis recovered. The case presented herein, like the four previous cases, illustrates the point that when patients with maternal GBS meningitis are treated immediately and have been healthy before the infection, the prognosis is good.
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8/11. Group G streptococcal endocarditis and bacteremia.

    This report describes fifteen recent cases of group G streptococcal bacteremia in patients with acute illnesses. Seven patients had acute endocarditis (47 percent). Four deaths occurred, and four patients had significant clinical complications during prolonged stormy courses. This series indicates a relatively high incidence of infective endocarditis in patients with group G streptococcal bacteremia, which is at variance with recent reports. Group G streptococcal bacteremia (with or without endocarditis) is a serious infection that often follows a hectic course with significant morbidity and mortality. The need for prompt recognition and aggressive treatment of this infection is underscored.
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9/11. Fatal perineal cellulitis from an episiotomy site.

    Perineal cellulitis originating from an episiotomy incision resulted in 20% of the maternal mortality in King County, washington, between 1969 and 1977. Necrotizing fasciitis was present in 2 of the cases, and clostridial myonecrosis was present in 1. These fatalities occurred because the practitioners were not aware that necrotizing fasciitis can occur in the fatty superficial fascia of the perineum and that resection of the necrotic tissue is necessary for successful therapy.
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10/11. An epidemic of "childbed fever".

    Postpartum infection remains a cause of considerable maternal morbidity and occasional maternal mortality. Puerperal sepsis mediated by what is now known as group A beta-hemolytic streptococci or streptococcus pyogenes was once a common and lethal nosocomial scourge. Fortunately, multiple developments have decreased the incidence and ameliorated the clinical course of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal postpartum sepsis. Despite these developments, epidemic group A streptococcal sepsis still jeopardizes modern mothers. We describe an epidemic of five women with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci-mediated postpartum infections which occurred at Mather air Force Base Hospital, Sacramento, california. The remarkable, yet characteristic signs, symptoms, and clinical course of these patients are briefly reviewed along with the epidemiologic methods which led to the discovery of the common nosocomial source. Familiarization of the clinical aspects of these patients and the methods used to eradicate this epidemic will facilitate the protection and care of other women. Unfortunately, modern mothers still remain in jeopardy from "childbed fever."
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