Cases reported "Pulmonary Edema"

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1/138. Postoperative pulmonary edema.

    BACKGROUND: Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema may be caused by upper airway obstruction due to laryngospasm after general anesthesia. This syndrome of "negative pressure pulmonary edema" is apparently well known among anesthesiologists but not by other medical specialists. methods: We reviewed the cases of seven patients who had acute pulmonary edema postoperatively. RESULTS: There was no evidence of fluid overload or occult cardiac disease, but upper airway obstruction was the most common etiology. Each patient responded quickly to therapy without complications. CONCLUSIONS: Of the seven patients with noncardiogenic postoperative pulmonary edema, at least three cases were associated with documented laryngospasm causing upper airway obstruction. This phenomenon has been reported infrequently in the medical literature and may be underdiagnosed. Immediate recognition and treatment of this syndrome are important. The prognosis for complete recovery is excellent.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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2/138. Negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage.

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema, a well-recognized phenomenon, is the formation of pulmonary edema following an acute upper airway obstruction (UAO). To our knowledge, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage has not been reported previously as a complication of an UAO. We describe a case of negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage, and we propose that its etiology is stress failure, the mechanical disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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3/138. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema caused by biting and endotracheal tube occlusion--a case for oropharyngeal airways.

    A patient had general anaesthesia for laparoscopic surgery. She bit on and occluded her endotracheal tube during recovery from anaesthesia. Strong inspiratory efforts during airway obstruction caused negative pressure pulmonary oedema. The pulmonary oedema resolved within 24 hours. Use of an oropharyngeal airway as a bite block could have prevented this complication.
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ranking = 0.40776619878232
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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4/138. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema immediately following rapid protamine administration.

    OBJECTIVE: To report the case of a rare, potentially preventable, immediate noncardiogenic pulmonary edema reaction to the rapid administration of protamine during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. CASE SUMMARY: A 74-year-old white man was administered a 250-mg bolus of protamine sulfate toward the end of CABG surgery to reverse the heparin anticoagulation. Immediately following the administration of protamine, oxygen saturation declined, pink frothy sputum was suctioned from the trachea, and 1500 mL of serous fluid was removed from the airway. The patient was stabilized, but the surgeons were unable to close his chest because of the profound edema. Chest closure occurred on hospital day 6, with discharge from the intensive care unit on hospital day 28. DISCUSSION: Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema is a rare adverse event that occurs in 0.2% of cardiopulmonary bypass patients, with mortality rates approaching 30%. complement activation or direct pharmacologic release of histamine by high concentrations of protamine is the suspected cause. High concentrations of protamine in the lungs may directly release histamine, with significant vasodilating effects. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate reversal of heparin anticoagulation with protamine is necessary to control bleeding; however, rapid protamine injection can be associated with life-threatening pulmonary edema. Slower, cautious administration and accurate calculation of protamine doses may prevent such an event.
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ranking = 0.014886573089797
keywords = airway
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5/138. Unilateral negative pressure pulmonary edema during anesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway.

    PURPOSE: To present a case of unilateral pulmonary edema after upper airway obstruction. CLINICAL FEATURES: In a 21-yr-old man, anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with N2O/O2/isoflurane via an LMA. After being placed in the lateral position, he had an episode of upper airway obstruction while breathing spontaneously. Hypoxemia (SpO2 80-83%) refractory to the administration of oxygen (F1O2 1.0) ensued following relief of the obstruction. Chest X-ray showed edema of the dependent lung. Treatment consisted of placing the patient in the sitting position and supplemental oxygen. The situation resolved over a few hours. CONCLUSION: If airway obstruction occurs in the lateral position, development of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) in the dependent lung is favoured by hydrostatic forces and possibly the elevated resting position of the dependent hemidiaphragm.
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ranking = 1.0682127734656
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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6/138. Biting the laryngeal mask: an unusual cause of negative pressure pulmonary edema.

    PURPOSE: To describe negative pressure pulmonary edema due to biting of the laryngeal mask tube at emergence from general anesthesia. CLINICAL FEATURES: A healthy patient underwent general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway and mechanical ventilation. During recovery, the patient strongly bit the laryngeal mask and made very forceful inspiratory efforts until the mask was removed. Five minutes later, the patient developed dyspnea and had an hemoptysis of 50 ml fresh blood. Chest radiograph showed bilateral alveolar infiltrates. Pharyngo-laryngeal examination was normal. bronchoscopy revealed no injury but diffuse pink frothy edema fluid. Clinical examination and chest radiograph became normal after 12 hr of nasal oxygen therapy confirming airway obstruction as the most available cause of this pulmonary edema. CONCLUSION: airway obstruction due to biting of a laryngeal mask tube may result in negative pressure pulmonary edema.
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ranking = 0.35688638752952
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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7/138. Postobstructive pulmonary oedema--a case series and review.

    Six cases of post-extubation pulmonary oedema in otherwise healthy patients are reported. All were preceded by an episode of laryngospasm and followed a clinical course similar to that previously documented in cases of post-obstructive pulmonary oedema. Frank haemoptysis was a feature of five of the presentations. One patient was reintubated and ventilated, two were admitted to the intensive care unit for mask CPAP, one was managed with CPAP in the recovery ward and two with supplemental oxygen only. All cases resolved fully within 24 hours. Some evidence points to the syndrome being the result of airway bleeding rather than true pulmonary oedema. The literature suggests that it occurs more commonly than is generally thought, with a frequency of 0.05 to 0.1% of all anaesthetics, and is often unrecognised or misdiagnosed. Most cases occur in the early postoperative period, so anaesthetists are well placed to witness, investigate and manage this interesting condition.
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ranking = 0.014886573089797
keywords = airway
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8/138. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema due to foreign body aspiration.

    A patient who developed non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema secondary to acute airway obstruction caused by an aspirated foreign body is presented. The literature is reviewed, discussing the theories regarding the formation of non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. The case highlights the importance of this rare complication of foreign body aspiration and surgeons and anaesthetists should be alert to continued respiratory symptoms following relief of acute airway obstruction.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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9/138. Severe acute lung injury induced by gemcitabine.

    Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analog that is active in the treatment of various solid tumors. In general it is well tolerated and has few side effects. Pulmonary toxicity reported with gemcitabine use is usually mild and self-limiting. We present a case of severe pulmonary dysfunction after intravenous administration of a single dose of gemcitabine in a 58-year-old female patient with metastatic carcinoma of the pancreas. She developed tachypnea, marked hypoxemia, and an interstitial infiltrate on chest radiograph consistent with pulmonary edema, 4 days after receiving this drug. diuretics and corticosteroids were beneficial in treating the acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary damage was completely resolved by means of clinical and radiological assessment. Because of the severity of this side effect, no further treatment with gemcitabine was given. Eventually, the patient died because of obstruction of the bowel due to progression of tumor growth. publications concerning severe pulmonary toxicity due to gemcitabine are sparse. Pathophysiology and treatment are considered and a review of the literature is presented.
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ranking = 0.0086664811063905
keywords = obstruction
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10/138. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in a pediatric patient: case report and review.

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) continues to be reported as a complication of upper airway obstructions seen by anesthesia providers during induction or emergence. The majority of patients reported to have experienced NPPE have been healthy, without underlying pulmonary or cardiac disease. Factors associated with the formation of NPPE include young male patients and patients with long periods of airway obstruction. Overzealous intraoperative fluid administration and preexisting heart and lung disease also have been implicated as predisposing factors. Negative pressure pulmonary edema is the result of a marked decrease in intrathoracic pressure caused by ventilatory efforts against a closed glottis resulting in a disruption of the normal intravascular Starling mechanism, ultimately leading to the transudation of intravascular proteins and fluid into the pulmonary interstitium. The onset of NPPE is usually rapid, and without prompt recognition and intervention, the outcome can be fatal. A case of NPPE in a pediatric patient after an otherwise uncomplicated surgical procedure was observed in our institution and is described in this report.
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ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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