Cases reported "Pulmonary Edema"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. The pathology of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury is an uncommon condition characterized by the rapid onset of respiratory distress soon after transfusion. Our understanding of its pathophysiology is based on animal models of complement (C5a) and antibody-induced lung injury and a limited number of autopsies. These models suggest that transfusion-related acute lung injury is induced by granulocytes that aggregate in the pulmonary microvasculature after activation by transfusion-derived antibodies or biologically active lipids. The published autopsy reports provide little support for this model, as they are invariably confounded by underlying pulmonary infection, preexisting disease, and resuscitation injury. We report the case of a previously well 58-year-old man who died of transfusion-related acute lung injury within 2 hours of the onset of pulmonary distress; autopsy showed evidence of massive pulmonary edema with granulocyte aggregation within the pulmonary microvasculature and extravasation into alveoli. Electron microscopy revealed capillary endothelial damage with activated granulocytes in contact with the alveolar basement membranes. These findings provide direct support for the proposed model of transfusion-related acute lung injury pathogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Percutaneous transcatheter implantation of an aortic valve prosthesis for calcific aortic stenosis: first human case description.

    BACKGROUND: The design of a percutaneous implantable prosthetic heart valve has become an important area for investigation. A percutaneously implanted heart valve (PHV) composed of 3 bovine pericardial leaflets mounted within a balloon-expandable stent was developed. After ex vivo testing and animal implantation studies, the first human implantation was performed in a 57-year-old man with calcific aortic stenosis, cardiogenic shock, subacute leg ischemia, and other associated noncardiac diseases. Valve replacement had been declined for this patient, and balloon valvuloplasty had been performed with nonsustained results. methods AND RESULTS: With the use of an antegrade transseptal approach, the PHV was successfully implanted within the diseased native aortic valve, with accurate and stable PHV positioning, no impairment of the coronary artery blood flow or of the mitral valve function, and a mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. Immediately and at 48 hours after implantation, valve function was excellent, resulting in marked hemodynamic improvement. Over a follow-up period of 4 months, the valvular function remained satisfactory as assessed by sequential transesophageal echocardiography, and there was no recurrence of heart failure. However, severe noncardiac complications occurred, including a progressive worsening of the leg ischemia, leading to leg amputation with lack of healing, infection, and death 17 weeks after PHV implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Nonsurgical implantation of a prosthetic heart valve can be successfully achieved with immediate and midterm hemodynamic and clinical improvement. After further device modifications, additional durability tests, and confirmatory clinical implantations, PHV might become an important therapeutic alternative for the treatment of selected patients with nonsurgical aortic stenosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. insulin reverses haemodynamic changes and pulmonary oedema in children stung by the Indian red scorpion Mesobuthus tamulus concanesis, Pocock.

    The efficacy of insulin administration in reversing haemodynamic changes in pulmonary oedema in victims of poisonous scorpion sting is assessed by a study based on animal experiments in which insulin administration reversed metabolic and electrocardiographic changes induced by scorpion envenomation. Six previously healthy children aged 18 months to 11 years were admitted to hospital five to 17 hours after scorpion sting. Frusemide for raised central venous pressure and pulmonary oedema, crystalloid infusion for reduced central venous pressure, and hydrocortisone and dopamine for hypotension were used as standard therapy. insulin (0.3 units g-1 of glucose) was administered when the standard therapy failed to produce an improvement, and at the earliest sign of haemodynamic instability. Reversal of pulmonary oedema and haemodynamic changes, and attainment or normal respiratory rate, blood pressure and central venous pressure, were observed. It is concluded that insulin administration may be useful in reversing haemodynamic changes and pulmonary oedema in victims of scorpion stings.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. Reversible left ventricular wall motion impairment caused by pheochromocytoma--a case report.

    Excessive catecholamine levels can cause myocardial damage in experimental animals. Similar observations have been made in humans following autopsy for pheochromocytoma. However, whether catecholamine crises are reversible or not remains uncertain. We report here a case in which pheochromocytoma manifested as acute pulmonary edema during an operation. Serial echocardiograms revealed that the depressed motion of the left ventricular wall was reversed after tumor removal. The plasma catecholamine level was extraordinarily high during the episode of acute pulmonary edema, and it seems that catecholamines in high concentration can directly damage the myocardium.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. Hemorrhagic pulmonary edema associated with meat tenderizer treatment for esophageal meat impaction.

    We describe a case of acute hemorrhagic pulmonary edema caused by aspiration of Adolph's meat tenderizer, used in an attempt to relieve an esophageal meat impaction. We performed an animal experiment in which bronchial instillation of a similar solution reproduced the clinical findings in our patient. This is a previously unreported and potentially lethal complication of a therapy that has never been submitted to clinical trials. We recommend against the use of this therapy for patients with complete esophageal obstruction or in those otherwise at risk for aspiration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. pulmonary edema following air embolism.

    Venous air embolism is a major hazard during surgical procedures in the sitting position and is known to cause acute pulmonary edema in animal experiments (6, 7, 17). In man some cases of pulmonary edema immediately following air embolism have been described (10, 15, 16). In this case report we present a patient that developed pulmonary edema which became apparent several hours after the occurrence of air embolism.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Experimental evaluation of reexpansion pulmonary edema.

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema following pneumothorax is clinically uncommon but occasionally life threatening. This study documents the functional and anatomical abnormalities that occur when a collapsed lung is reexpanded. Right pneumothorax was created through open tube thoracostomy in 30 goats. The animals were divided into six groups by duration of pneumothorax (24, 48, or 72 hours) and technique of reexpansion (waterseal vs 10 cm H2O suction). Arterial blood gases and alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference (A-aDO2) were analyzed before pneumothorax and after reexpansion. Each lung was reexpanded for 2 hours, chest roentgenograms were obtained, and both lungs were removed. The left lung served as the control. Both lungs were checked for surfactant activity and pulmonary extravascular water volume (PEWY). light and electron microscopy were also performed. Anatomical and functional changes were present in the reexpanded lung after relief of pneumothorax. Both increased time of collapse and suction reexpansion tended to correlate with increased PEWV, decreased surfactant and arterial PO2, and increased A-aDO2.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Pulmonary oxygen toxic effect. Occurrence in a newborn infant despite low PaO2 due to an intracranial arteriovenous malformation.

    A newborn infant with a massive left to right shunt secondary to a cerebral arteriovenous malformation required continuous oxygen therapy in high concentrations. Despite high PO2, the infant maintained low to normal PaO2 concentrations. light and ultrastructural studies of the lungs demonstrated typical changes of acute pulmonary oxygen toxicity, including degeneration of capillary endothelium and type I pneumonocytes, interstitial edema, and alveolar exudation. These observations confirm earlier experimental animal studies that demonstrated that the alveolar Po2 concentration and not the Pao2 is the major factor contributing to pulmonary oxygen toxic effect.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. carbon monoxide effect on alveolar epithelial permeability.

    A carbon monoxide (CO)-intoxicated patient developed increased permeability-type pulmonary edema demonstrated by a normal capillary wedge pressure and production of protein-rich edema fluid. To investigate the effect of CO on alveolar-epithelial permeability, a radio-active labelled isotope, 51Cr-EDTA (MW 377), was instilled into the airways of rabbits. Subsequent egress of the marker from the lungs into arterial blood was determined in serial arterial blood samples. The 51Cr-EDTA counts increased significantly within 15 minutes in the CO-exposed animals, compared with the control animals, while dynamic lung compliance fell, airways resistance rose, and arterial blood pressure decreased. Ultrastructural study of the lungs of CO-exposed animals revealed epithelial and endothelial cell swelling, in terstitial edema, and alveolar type II cells depleted of lamellar bodies. These findings support the possibility that carbon monoxide intoxication is associated with increased alveolar-epithelial permeability.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Focal pulmonary edema after massive pulmonary embolism.

    We report here the occurrence of focal pulmonary edema within 4 h after massive acute pulmonary embolism. The edema appeared to develop only in areas with intact pulmonary arterial blood flow and occurred in the apparent absence of left ventricular dysfunction. This pattern of pulmonary edema after precapillary obstruction is similar to that seen in animal models of permeability pulmonary edema induced by acute nonuniform pulmonary arterial obstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pulmonary Edema'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.