Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Triple valve replacement in a patient with severe carcinoid heart disease.

    We report on the case of a 34-year-old male patient suffering from end-stage carcinoid heart disease with severe tricuspid, pulmonary and mitral valve regurgitation. In addition, a persisting foramen ovale was present. The primary carcinoid tumor was never discovered. However, urine 5-hydroxy-indole-acetic-acid (5-HIAA) were consistently elevated after the first diagnosis of carcinoid disease and after eight years of medication with octreotide and Interferon alpha-2b our patient developed significant cardiac insufficiency mainly due to severe valvular dysfunction. Ultimately, mechanical tricuspid, mitral and pulmonary valve replacement was performed. Twelve hours following the operation the patient had to be returned to the operating room for persisting intrathoracic hemorrhage. He recovered uneventfully and was discharged from hospital on day 37. Twelve months following triple valve replacement the cardiac status recovered from preoperative NYHA-IV to NYHA-I.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Correction of absent pulmonary valve syndrome using a pericardial valved conduit.

    Absent pulmonary valve syndrome in a 4-month-old infant was successfully corrected using a fresh autologous pericardial trileaflet valved conduit. He recovered from operation with only mild pulmonary regurgitation at 4 months postoperatively. This technique is an effective alternative for infants with congenital heart disease who need tissue valved conduits. It may be more suitable than the aortic homograft by reason of the shortage of small homografts and its lower costs.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Severe mitral valve involvement in a child with hypereosinophilia secondary to parasitic infection.

    An 11-year-old boy with severe mitral regurgitation due to hypereosinophilia caused by infection with a filaria (mansonella perstans) required mitral valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. During recurrent postoperative hypereosinophilia, the patient experienced severe mitral stenosis due to thrombosis of the mitral prosthesis. Despite adequate anticoagulation, the prosthesis had to be replaced as an emergency with a second prosthetic valve. Permanent control of the eosinophil count was achieved with chronic oral steroid administration. In contrast to other microfilariae, M. perstans is non-pathogenic to humans; nevertheless, longstanding hypereosinophilia may lead to severe cardiac involvement endangering the patient's life.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Mechanical heart valve prosthesis in the pulmonary position without anticoagulation: case report.

    A 10-year-old girl underwent tetralogy of fallot (TOF) repair and subsequent pulmonary valve replacement with a St. Jude Medical mechanical heart valve prosthesis. Valve replacement was necessary due to right heart failure resulting from pulmonary regurgitation occurring three months after TOF repair. At the age of 25 years, when she became pregnant, routine cardiac evaluation indicated that she had not used oral anticoagulation during the past 15 years. The patient was of rural origin, and of poor socioeconomic status, but is currently in her 15th postoperative year, with neither clinical problems nor any sign of valve failure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Main pulmonary artery aneurysm: a case report and review of the literature.

    Main pulmonary artery aneurysms are a rare entity with few available published data. As reported in the literature, operative treatment is commonly recommended but the relation between the size of the aneurysm, its localization, and the risk of rupture is not as well defined as for aortic aneurysms. Proximal lesions that involve the main branches of the pulmonary artery are usually apparent on chest radiographs and must be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. An early diagnosis allows timely surgical treatment. We report an unusual case of a main pulmonary artery aneurysm presenting with persistent non-productive cough and provide a review of the pertinent published data.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Repair of pulmonary valve insufficiency using an autologous monocusp.

    A 3 1/2-year-old boy experienced right ventricular failure approximately two years after an operation for critical pulmonic stenosis. Severe pulmonary and tricuspid valvular insufficiency was documented echocardiographically and at cardiac catheterization. Treatment consisted of a tricuspid valve annuloplasty and creation of an autologous monocusp valve using the anterior wall of the pulmonary artery. The procedure was well tolerated, and early competence of the pulmonary valve was shown intraoperatively by pressure recordings and postoperatively by Doppler echocardiography. However, at recatheterization one year later, there was no evidence that the monocusp valve was functioning. This experience does not support the prior successful application of this technique in animals.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Second operations for pulmonary stenosis or insufficiency after repair of tetralogy of fallot.

    Twenty-four patients with previous surgery for repair of tetralogy of fallot were in need of subsequent operative procedures for either residual pulmonary stenosis or pulmonary valve incompetence. The second operation was performed 1 to 21 years after the initial repair. The patients with pulmonary valve incompetence had evidence of marked right ventricular dysfunction and required pulmonary valve replacement. The patients with residual pulmonary stenosis had modifications of their pulmonary outflow tract to reduce the gradient. Five of the 15 patients with stenosis required pulmonary valve replacement. Clinical improvement has been good, but objective reversal of right ventricular dysfunction has been difficult to document.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. Early pulmonary homograft failure from dilatation due to distal pulmonary artery stenosis.

    Early progressive pulmonary homograft insufficiency developed in an 11-month-old infant after repair of truncus arteriosus because of dilatation secondary to the presence of residual distal pulmonary artery stenosis and hypoplasia. Before repair, the pulmonary artery branches were discontinuous, with the right pulmonary artery being somewhat hypoplastic and originating from the trunk, and the left pulmonary artery supplied by a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt created in the newborn period. At repair, a pulmonary homograft was used to connect the branches. Progressive cardiomegaly and oxygen dependance occurred 3 weeks postoperatively. cardiac catheterization showed systemic right ventricular pressure, severe homograft insufficiency, and residual distal pulmonary artery stenosis and hypoplasia. On reoperation at 3 months postoperatively, the homograft annulus diameter increased from 14 mm to 16 mm. dilatation and insufficiency probably occurred because the right ventricle and homograft distal to the obstruction functioned as a unit during systole. The problem might have been minimized with the use of aortic homograft, which is thicker, or annular reinforcement with a synthetic material.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.