Cases reported "Pyloric Stenosis"

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1/174. jaundice with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis as an early manifestation of Gilbert syndrome.

    jaundice associated with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis was recognised in three patients; previous reports have suggested that this is a possible early manifestation of Gilbert syndrome. Most patients with Gilbert syndrome are homozygous for a (TA)(7)TAA polymorphism in the gene promoter coding for bilirubin glucuronosyltransferase. Two of the reported patients were homozygous for the (TA)(7)TAA polymorphism whereas the third was heterozygous for the same polymorphism. Furthermore, no other factors contributing to jaundice in the three patients were found. These results suggest that jaundice associated with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is due to molecular defects within the gene promoter.
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keywords = stenosis
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2/174. The development of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a patient with prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia.

    BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) has been described in association with several obstructive antropyloric lesions including idiopathic foveolar hyperplasia (gastric mucosal hypertrophy), feeding tubes, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and hypertrophic antral polyps. Non obstructive antral webs have also been described with HPS. PATIENT AND methods: We present a case of gastric-outlet obstruction in association with HPS, namely, prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia. This entity has been previously described, but rarely in association with HPS. We report a female infant requiring prostaglandin therapy for pulmonary atresia who developed dose-related prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia and symptoms of progressive non-bilious vomiting. RESULTS: Initially, ultrasonography demonstrated evidence of antral mucosal hypertrophy as the cause for gastric-outlet obstruction. The patient subsequently developed progressive thickening of the antropyloric muscle, resulting in sonographic appearances of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Pyloromyotomy was eventually required for treatment of HPS. CONCLUSION: A common denominator of most of the above-described entities is thickening and/or hypertrophy of the antral mucosa. We suggest that the antropyloric musculature may hypertrophy in an effort to overcome the gastric-outlet obstruction caused by the adjacent thickened antral mucosa. In other words, these entities may represent examples of "secondary" hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
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ranking = 1.1666809116542
keywords = stenosis, obstructive
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3/174. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in infants following pertussis prophylaxis with erythromycin--Knoxville, tennessee, 1999.

    In February 1999, pertussis was diagnosed in six neonates born at hospital A in Knoxville, tennessee. Because a health-care worker at hospital A was most likely the source of exposure, the local health department recommended on February 25, 1999, that erythromycin be prescribed as postexposure prophylaxis for the approximately 200 infants born at hospital A during February 1-24, 1999. In March 1999, local pediatric surgeons noticed an increased number of cases of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) in the area, with seven cases occurring during a 2-week period. All seven IHPS cases were in infants born in hospital A during February who were given erythromycin orally for prophylaxis following possible exposure to pertussis, although none had pertussis diagnosed. The tennessee Department of health and CDC investigated the cluster of IHPS cases and its possible association with use of erythromycin. This report summarizes the results of the investigation, which suggest a causal role of erythromycin in this cluster of IHPS cases.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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4/174. A rare coexistence of two gastric outlet obstructive lesions: infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and organoaxial gastric volvulus.

    Infantile pyloric stenosis is one of the most common conditions requiring surgery during the first few weeks of life. The association of infantile pyloric stenosis with gastric volvulus in an extremely uncommon occurrence. A 10-month-old male infant operated for infantile pyloric stenosis at two months of age is presented. His current problem was recurrent pulmonary infections and he was diagnosed to have organoaxial gastric volvulus and gastroesophageal reflux. The common features of presentation, radiological findings, surgical procedures and possible mechanisms of gastric volvulus associated with infantile pyloric stenosis are discussed.
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ranking = 1.3333618233084
keywords = stenosis, obstructive
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5/174. An uncommon association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    Although infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following esophageal atresia repair is known, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following H-type tracheoesophageal fistula has not been encountered previously. A case of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patient, operated on for H-type fistula, a rare congenital anomaly of the esophagus, on the tenth day of life was readmitted 19 days later because of continuous vomiting after every feeding. The clinical findings and physical and radiological examinations revealed infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis which required surgical treatment. It is suggested that the association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is coincidental, given the estimated incidence of one in every 84,375,000 males and 337,500,000 females.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = stenosis
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6/174. The posterior approach to pyloric sonography.

    Overlying bowel gas or gastric distension may occasionally hinder the sonographic diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. To address this problem, a novel approach for obtaining posterior views of the pylorus is reported. Utilizing this approach may decrease the incidence of nondiagnostic pyloric ultrasonography.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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7/174. Radial aplasia, poikiloderma and auto-immune enterocolitis--new syndrome or severe form of rothmund-thomson syndrome?

    A syndrome is described in three isolated patients in whom the main features are bilateral radial aplasia, short stature, an inflammatory based 'elastic' pyloric stenosis, a pan-enteric inflammatory gut disorder that appears to be due to an autoimmune process, and poikiloderma. Other features in individual cases include cleft palate, micrognathia, anal atresia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia and sensorineural deafness. This combination may represent a severe form of rothmund-thomson syndrome or possibly a previously unrecognized condition.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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8/174. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of partial trisomy 9q in a case with pyloric stenosis and a review.

    Partial trisomy 9q represents a rare and heterogeneous group of chromosomal aberrations characterised by various clinical features including pyloric stenosis. Here, we describe the case of a 1 year old female patient with different dysmorphic features including pyloric stenosis and prenatally detected partial trisomy 9q. This partial trisomy 9q has been analysed in detail to determine the size of the duplication and to characterise the chromosomal breakpoints. According to the data gained by different molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with whole and partial chromosome painting probes, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) probes, and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), the derivative chromosome 9 can be described as dup(9)(pter-->q22. 1::q31.1-->q22.1::q31.1--> q22.1::q31.1-->qter). Four breakpoint spanning YACs have been identified (y806f02, y906g6, y945f5, and y747b3) for the proximal breakpoint. According to this new case and previously published data, the recently postulated putative critical region for pyloric stenosis can be narrowed down to the subbands 9q22.1-q31.1 and is the result of either partial trisomy of gene(s) located in this region or a gene disrupted in 9q31.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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9/174. Laparoscopic pyloroplasty in idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an adult.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, in adults, is a rare disease. Partial gastrectomy, gastroenterostomy, pyloromyotomy, pyloroplasty and endoscopic dilatation have all been recommended with variable results. A 54-year-old white female is presented with the onset of symptoms of idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis one year prior to operation. Two endoscopic pyloric sphincter balloon dilatations provided only temporary relief. METHOD: A laparoscopic pyloroplasty was performed. RESULT: The patient tolerated a solid diet on postoperative day three. The patient was symptom-free at a 13 month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in adults can be treated with laparoscopic pyloroplasty, offering a minimally invasive alternative to open repair.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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10/174. Early death in two sisters with Hennekam syndrome.

    We report on two sisters with facial anomalies, protein-losing enteropathy, and intestinal lymphangiectasia consistent with the diagnosis of Hennekam syndrome. Both patients had a number of other anomalies not previously described in this autosomal recessive disorder, i.e., primary hypothyroidism, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, and an early fatal outcome. These cases support the autosomal recessive transmission and the expansion of the phenotype of the Hennekam syndrome.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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