Cases reported "Pyoderma Gangrenosum"

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1/10. Treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum with oral tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside.

    Two patients with refractory pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) were treated with oral tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside (TWG). TWG is a Chinese medicine extracted from a medicinal herb, tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, and has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The effect of TWG on PG was demonstrated by clinical findings. Improvement of the lesions occurred within two weeks, and the ulcers healed about a month. Mild side effects such as gastrointestinal disturbances were observed in both patients. These side effects were patient-acceptable, and there was no need to stop the treatment. Transient elevation of serum ALT was observed in one patient; the serum ALT returned completely to normal after the discontinuation of TWG. These results suggest that TWG may be an effective alternative for refractory PG and that careful monitoring of liver function during TWG treatment is necessary.
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2/10. Corticosteroid-resistant pyoderma gangrenosum associated with Crohn's disease: rapid cure with infliximab.

    A 41-year-old woman with Crohn's disease had a severe and rapidly extensive corticosteroid-resistant pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) of the leg. She had been treated 2 years previously with antibiotics and surgery for a similar lesion of the back of the hand which had been diagnosed as a fulminating infection. Infliximab 5 mg/kg was given at weeks 0, 5 and 9. A dramatic response was observed within 72 h with a favourable effect persisting for 4 weeks after each infliximab infusion. A complete healing was achieved at week 11. This case illustrates that (1). PG of the hand is frequently misdiagnosed as an infection and treated with inappropriate therapies; (2). infliximab may be an interesting alternative in corticosteroid-resistant PG associated with Crohn's disease.
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3/10. Infliximab for peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum.

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a variant of pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) that is more refractory to treatment. It is a cause of severe morbidity and poses a therapeutic challenge for the clinician. Infliximab (Remicade(R); Centocor, Malvern, PA, USA) is a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumour necrosis factor-alpha that has been proven to be effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, very few reports exist documenting its use in the treatment of PG and none in the treatment of PPG. We describe our experience of treating three patients with IBD-associated PPG with infliximab. All patients tolerated the drug without significant side-effects. Two patients with PPG recovered completely following the administration of infliximab, and one patient had a partial response to the drug. We conclude that infliximab appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic alternative in patients with PPG.
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4/10. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha monoclonal antibody (infliximab) for the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum associated with Crohn's disease.

    Here we report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) associated with Crohn's disease successfully treated with infliximab. The efficacy of this drug in many inflammatory diseases has already been reported, but its use in PG has only been seen in very few cases. Our study confirms that this therapy is a valid alternative solution for treating PG, which is often unresponsive to conventional therapies.
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5/10. pyoderma gangrenosum of the "sinus mammarum" in ulcerative colitis.

    The first part of this article deals with the report of a patient suffering from pyoderma gangrenosum of the "sinus mammarum" associated with asymptomatic ulcerative colitis. This is followed by a revision of the present epidemiological, etiological, pathogenetic and clinical knowledges about this systemic manifestation of chronic phlogosis of the colon. The Authors have analysed the treatment for this condition and emphasized the resistance of the cutaneous ulcer encountered to conventional medical therapy of the underlying colonic disease which proved to be efficacious only on the latter; this led to integrate traditional treatment with the use of perilesional injections of small doses of calcic heparin as an alternative to immunosuppressive drugs or surgery. Topical antithrombotic treatment, which can be justified by the histological findings of phenomena of the vasculitis in the edge of pyoderma gangrenosum, demonstrated to be crucial and represents a peculiarity in the case here reported, which is unique in the literature as far as the Authors know, since it has not been experimented by anyone else.
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6/10. Successful therapy of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum and periorbital phlegmona with tacrolimus (FK506) in ulcerative colitis.

    We describe two male patients with ulcerative colitis and refractory pyoderma gangrenosum including periorbital phlegmona in one case. Both patients were successfully managed with low dose oral tacrolimus (0.1 mg/kg bodyweight per day). serum trough levels were closely monitored and maintained between 4 and 6 ng/mL. A rapid response was noted in both cases. Complete non-scarring skin restitution without side effects was accomplished in both cases. Low dose oral tacrolimus provides a valuable alternative treatment option for IBD patients with refractory pyoderma gangrenosum.
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7/10. Topical tacrolimus therapy for pyoderma gangrenosum.

    pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a type of neutrophilic disorder with a chronic clinical course. immunosuppressive agents have been used for its management. Among them, corticosteroid is known as the most effective. However, other immunosuppressants including cyclosporine A have been selected for patients with PG who were refractory to systemic steroids. Herein we report a case of PG resistant to systemic steroids, who was successfully treated with topical tacrolimus. A fifty-four year-old male had a 14-year history of PG. In 2002, necrotic ulcers appeared on his right leg that were refractory to oral prednisolone (30 mg/day). The application of topical tacrolimus to the border of the ulcers hastened epithelization of the ulcers and allowed for reduction of the oral prednisolone. Topical tacrolimus therapy may be an effective alternative for PG when the lesion is poorly controlled by corticosteroid.
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8/10. pyoderma gangrenosum treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins: Two cases and review of the literature.

    pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a neutrophilic skin disease commonly treated with immunosuppressants. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulins are used to treat a range of inflammatory diseases, but we found only five reports of the use of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins in the treatment of PG. We report on two patients with PG for whom immunosuppressants could not be prescribed and who were treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins.Case 1 was a 58-year-old man who presented with a 6-year history of PG. He was initially treated with prednisone. The 20 mg/day dosage of prednisone could not be reduced and treatment had to be discontinued after 1 year because of serious adverse effects. minocycline treatment led to improvement but had to be discontinued after 6 years because of facial skin hyperpigmentation. Case 2 was a 66-year-old man who presented with a 3-year history of PG. Different therapeutic procedures for PG (prednisone, topical tacrolimus or betamethasone) had failed. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulins were administered monthly at a dose of 2 g/kg for 6 months. The treatment induced stabilisation of the disease and made it possible to reduce corticosteroid use in both patients. These cases show that high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins represent a therapeutic alternative for PG, but the efficacy of this treatment should be confirmed in further studies.
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9/10. Unusual cutaneous manifestations of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    We report a 58-year-old patient with acute myeloid leukaemia who developed an oedematous erythema resembling Sweet's syndrome, accompanied by atypical erythema nodosum and bullous pyoderma gangrenosum. Examination of skin biopsies showed dense infiltration with mature neutrophils, although there was peripheral blood leucocytopenia. The oedematous erythema worsened after he was treated with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which was given for his leucocytopenia. We suggest that when a neutrophilic dermatosis complicates leukaemia, alternatives to G-CSF should be considered for the treatment of leucocytopenia. Corticosteroids were very effective in controlling the skin lesions in our patient.
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10/10. A case of pyoderma gangrenosum stabilized with lymecycline, topical benzoyl peroxide and treated by autograft.

    pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic inflammatory ulcerative skin disease of unknown etiology, often associated with various systemic disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic active hepatitis, diabetes mellitus and hematologic malignancies. The ulcers are characterized by their undermined violaceous borders. The disease remains a therapeutic challenge. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy; however, side effects from this treatment and recalcitrant pyoderma gangrenosum require therapeutic alternatives. We report the case of a large subacute pyoderma gangrenosum stabilized with lymecycline, topical benzoyl peroxide and successfully treated by an autograft. This observation supports the opinion that the risk of pathergy of a graft can be avoided by the stabilization of the disease.
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