Cases reported "Q Fever"

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1/11. First report of q fever in oman.

    Although serologic evidence suggests the presence of q fever in humans and animals in saudi arabia and the united arab emirates, acute q fever has not been reported on the Arabian Peninsula. We report the first two cases of acute q fever in oman.
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2/11. Primary aortoduodenal fistula and q fever: an underrecognized association?

    We report a rare case of primary aortoduodenal fistula (ADF) secondary to a coxiella burnetii (q fever) infection in a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A review of the available literature on the vascular complications of q fever is presented. q fever should be suspected in vascular patients with close animal contact when a standard infectious work-up is unrevealing. Diagnostic steps and management strategies for primary ADF are also briefly reviewed.
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3/11. q fever--california, georgia, pennsylvania, and tennessee, 2000-2001.

    q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium coxiella burnetii. The most common reservoirs are domesticated ruminants, primarily cattle, sheep, and goats. humans acquire q fever typically by inhaling aerosols or contaminated dusts derived from infected animals or animal products. Its highly infectious nature and aerosol route of transmission make C. burnetii a possible agent of bioterrorism. Although up to 60% of initial infections are asymptomatic, acute disease can manifest as a relatively mild, self-limited febrile illness, or more moderately severe disease characterized by hepatitis or pneumonia. It manifests less commonly as myocarditis, pericarditis, and meningoencephalitis. Chronic q fever occurs in <1% of infected patients, months or years after initial infection. chronic disease manifests most commonly as a culture-negative endocarditis in patients with valvular heart disease. During 2000-2001, a total of 48 patients who met the case definition of q fever were reported to CDC. This report describes the case investigations for six of these patients, which indicate that these persons acquired q fever probably through direct or indirect contact with livestock. To enhance surveillance efforts, health-care providers should report cases of q fever to state health departments.
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4/11. q fever endocarditis: diagnostic approaches and monitoring of therapeutic effects.

    The scope of current diagnostic methods for q fever endocarditis includes serology, direct demonstration of coxiella burnetii in the resected heart valve tissue, and animal inoculation studies. Illustrated by a clinical case report, the different methods are presented and discussed. serology represents the primary method, using the techniques of complement fixation, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The latter two techniques allow the detection of immunoglobulins G, M, and A to the phase I and II antigens of C. burnetii. After cardiac surgery, we visualized C. burnetii on smears and specifically stained it on histologic sections of the resected heart valve by light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. In addition, seroconversion in animals after inoculation with valve specimens confirmed the presence of C. burnetii in the heart valve. The antibody titers determined by ELISA correlated well with the patient's clinical course during the treatment period. Therefore it is suggested that its usefulness for monitoring the efficacy of antimicrobial agents in patients with q fever endocarditis should be further evaluated.
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5/11. q fever with clinical features resembling systemic lupus erythematosus.

    A 23-year-old woman with prolonged fever, rash, and pericarditis associated with high titers of antinuclear, anti-Sm, and anti-RNP antibodies was suspected of having systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, we also considered infectious diseases, particularly q fever, as the c-reactive protein level was elevated and the patient reported contact with zoo animals around two weeks before the onset. The condition responded rapidly to administration of minocycline; symptoms resolved without using steroids. Thereafter, no recurrence of the illness was observed. Titer of coxiella burnetii antibody was high and the illness was accordingly diagnosed as acute q fever rather than SLE.
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6/11. epidemiology and ecology of rickettsial diseases in the People's Republic of china.

    Since 1949, information on rickettsial diseases in the People's Republic of china has been virtually nonexistent in the West. This is the first comprehensive review of the ecology and epidemiology of Chinese rickettsial diseases to be published outside the People's Republic. At least five rickettsioses exist in china: scrub typhus, murine typhus, epidemic typhus, q fever, and one or more spotted fever-group (SFG) rickettsioses. Although epidemic typhus has been controlled and scrub typhus has abated in many areas, murine typhus, q fever, and SFG rickettsiosis are important public health problems. Serologic surveys indicate high prevalences of antibodies to coxiella burnetii, rickettsia tsutsugamushi, and SFG rickettsiae in some regions; these rickettsiae have been isolated from humans, arthropods, and animals. doxycycline has emerged as the best treatment for murine typhus, epidemic typhus, and scrub typhus. china offers both opportunities and challenges for the investigation and alleviation of the problems of rickettsial diseases.
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7/11. q fever. A call to heighten our index of suspicion.

    The prevalence of q fever infection is probably underestimated. In michigan, the first two reported human cases of q fever occurred in 1984. The case-patients lived in adjacent, rural counties and had multiple exposures to goats. We conducted a serosurvey of goat owners and a reference population to compare the prevalence of q fever antibodies in the two-county area. Goat owners were almost three times more likely to be seropositive with q fever antibodies than the reference population (43% vs 15%). Among goat owners, individual and household seropositivity prevalences were positively correlated with the number of goats, the number of positive goats, and the number of goat births on the farm. q fever should be considered more often in the differential diagnosis of patients with compatible illness, especially those with frequent animal contact.
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8/11. An unexpected q fever endocarditis. Report of a case.

    A man with blood culture negative endocarditis since 1983 received in October 1984 a mitral valve bioprosthesis. Reintervention in April 1985 was performed because of a paravalvular leak. In September 1985, mitral insufficiency reappeared and high-titer phase II q fever antibody was detected, which has since then persisted with concomitant high-titers of phase I antibody. In serum from 1983, phase II antibody was detected on reexamination in September 1985. For unexplained reasons this antibody had not been detected in 1983. The patient has since September 1985 been successfully treated with doxycycline. The current literature is reviewed. q fever endocarditis should be considered also in belgium in culture negative endocarditis even in persons with no previous history of valvular disease and no known exposure to animals or unpasteurized dairy products. Quality of viral reagents and diagnosis present sometimes a challenge.
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9/11. A fatal case of q fever hepatitis in a child.

    A two-year-old boy of Arabic extraction presented with progressive jaundice and prolonged pyrexia. Both IgM and IgG immunofluorescent antibody titers for q fever were 1:1280. Two goats and one cow of the domestic animals owned by the family also had positive antibody titers against q fever. In spite of antibiotic treatment with tetracyclines and chloramphenicol, the hepatic involvement progressed gradually. On the twentieth day of admission the child succumbed from hepatic failure. This child presents a rare case of fatal hepatic failure due to q fever.
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10/11. q fever in maritime canada.

    Only nine cases of q fever were recorded in canada in the 20 years prior to 1978. In the 18 months from August 1979 to January 1981 the disease was diagnosed serologically in six patients from the Maritime provinces. All were epidemiologically unrelated and none had been exposed to animals. Five had pneumonia and one had chronic q fever with probable prosthetic valve endocarditis. Three of the five pneumonia patients presented with signs and symptoms of an acute lower respiratory tract infection and were indistinguishable clinically from other patients with atypical pneumonias. The other two with pneumonia presented with nonresolving pulmonary infiltrates and complained of decreased energy. Four of the five pneumonia patients responded well to treatment with erythromycin; the fifth required two courses of tetracycline. The patient with chronic q fever had a large amount of cryoglobulins in his serum and evidence of immune complex disease. These cases indicate that q fever should be considered as a possible cause of atypical pneumonia in canada.
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