Cases reported "Q Fever"

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11/152. Acute q fever: a cause of fatal hepatitis in an Icelandic traveller.

    Domestic q fever is rare in the Nordic countries; the infection is acquired abroad in the majority of cases. This is the first Nordic report of a fatal case of q fever, which occurred in an Icelandic cancer patient who had travelled to the Canary islands.
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12/152. Intractable q fever treated with recombinant gamma interferon.

    A 3-year-old boy with q fever received several kinds of antibiotics including minocycline, but spiking fever and positive PCR of coxiella burnetii continued for several months. He became asymptomatic and his abnormal laboratory data normalized after the administration of gamma interferon three times a week.
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13/152. q fever during pregnancy: an emerging cause of prematurity and abortion.

    BACKGROUND: Although the pathogenic role of coxiella burnetii infection during pregnancy is controversial, some cases of stillbirth and abortion occurring after an acute or chronic infection have been mentioned in the literature. Recently, Q fever has been advocated as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnancy CASE: We describe an 18-year-old primipara woman admitted to our hospital for high fever and pancytopenia during an acute C. burnetii infection. She was successfully treated with clarithromycin, overcoming fever and pancytopenia. Finally, she gave birth to a healthy infant, and 1 year later both remained well. CONCLUSION: q fever is a potentially serious disease in pregnancy owing to the possibility of placenta infection and fetal transmission affecting its outcome. q fever infection should be suspected in unexplained febrile episodes or abortion during pregnancy, when epidemiologic and clinical data are present. We believe that C. burnetii serology should be tested in cases of fever of known origin or unexplained abortions, as the TORCH infections are.
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14/152. Sexually transmitted q fever.

    We report the sexual transmission of coxiella burnetii from a man with occupationally acquired q fever to his wife. Fifteen days after coitus, his wife also developed serologically proven acute q fever. C. burnetii dna sequences were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on semen samples obtained from the husband at 4 and 15 months after the onset of acute q fever, but PCR results were variable at 23 months, indicating the presence of few organisms.
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15/152. The pathologic findings in rickettsial pneumonia.

    A fatal case of q fever pneumonia with demonstration of the organisms in the lungs is presented. The disease clinically simulates bacterial lobar pneumonia. neutrophils were conspicuously absent in the inflammatory process. histiocytes predominated in the alveolar septal spaces and produced both radiologically and pathologically an alevolar infiltrate. Histiocytic hyperplasia and focal necrosis were present. histiocytes similar to those seen in the alveolar spaces of the lungs distorted the normal architecture of the lymph nodes. In scattered areas necrosis with histiocytes palisading in the periphery simulating the lesions of cat-scratch disease and tularemia were seen.
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16/152. hemolytic-uremic syndrome associated with coxiella burnetii infection.

    Acute q fever most commonly manifests as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia or hepatitis. We report the case of a 12-year-old child with documented exposure to sources of coxiella burnetii who was admitted to our hospital because of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. serologic tests established the diagnosis of acute q fever.
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17/152. Hepatic fibrin-ring granulomas in granulomatous hepatitis: report of four cases and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: The differential diagnosis of hepatic fibrin-ring granulomas includes infective agents (Coxiella burneti, CMV, EBV,....), hypersensitivity to medication (allopurinol) and malignancy. methods: During a period of 6 months, four patients presented at our university hospital with a similar clinical picture of fever and abnormal liver tests, and fibrin-ring granulomas on liver biopsy. Clinical course, laboratory and imaging findings, and histopathological features were compared. RESULTS: Clinical manifestations, and laboratory and imaging findings were similar. Histopathological assessment of the hepatic fibrin-ring granulomas appeared not to be helpful in identifying the causative agent. Other histopathological features (e.g. sinusoidal rows of lymphocytes, eosinophilic polymorphonuclear infiltrate) were suggestive for the causative agent, yet conclusive identification was obtained by either serology (q fever, CMV, EBV), or by exclusion with concomitant stop of medication (allopurinol). CONCLUSIONS: In the differential diagnosis of hepatic fibrin-ring granulomas, serologic titers remain the determining factor, since an infective agent is the most common cause. When hepatic fibrin-ring granulomas are present, other histopathological features may be helpful in making the differential diagnosis.
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18/152. Clinically and histologically silent q fever endocarditis accidentally diagnosed by PCR.

    A case of q fever endocarditis was diagnosed in a patient with no sign of active endocarditis by performing PCR targeting eubacterial 16S rDNA on the resected mitral valve. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of high levels of anti-Coxiella burnetti antibodies, positive immunohistologic analysis of the valve tissue with specific antibodies and culture of C. burnetti from the valve tissue. As this patient had an unexplained aggravation of valve dysfunction, we recommended routine serologic testing for C. burnetti to allow the diagnosis of q fever endocarditis at a very early stage.
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19/152. doxycycline and chloroquine as treatment for chronic q fever endocarditis.

    endocarditis is a rare but severe complication of q fever, an infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen coxiella burnetii. heart involvement is the most common clinical presentation of chronic q fever, and it occurs almost invariably in patients with previous valvular disease or artificial valves, and in the immunocompromised host. The optimal treatment of q fever endocarditis is still today debated, and recommended duration of treatment varies from one year to one's lifespan. A case of chronic q fever endocarditis is described in a patient with biological prosthetic aortic valve and aortic homograft, successfully treated with doxycycline and chloroquine for 2 years.
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20/152. Acute q fever pericarditis followed by chronic hepatitis in a two-year-old girl.

    Acute coxiella burnetii infection is most commonly a mild and self-limiting disease with fever, pneumonia and hepatitis. endocarditis is the most frequent clinical presentation of chronic infection. We report a 2-year-old child with q fever who presented with acute pericarditis and cardiac tamponade and who developed a chronic hepatic infection.
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