Cases reported "Quadriplegia"

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1/7. Flaccid quadriplegia from tonsillar herniation in pneumococcal meningitis.

    A young woman with fulminant pyogenic meningitis became quadriplegic, areflexic and flaccid due to herniation of the cerebellar tonsils and compression of the upper cervical cord. This state of spinal shock was associated with absent F-waves. intracranial pressure was greatly elevated and there was an uncertain relationship of tonsillar descent to a preceding lumbar puncture. Partial recovery occurred over 2 years. Tonsillar herniation can cause flaccid quadriplegia that may be mistaken for critical illness polyneuropathy. This case demonstrates cervicomedullary infarction from compression, a mechanism that is more likely than the sometimes proposed infectious vasculitis of the upper cord.
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2/7. Acute cervical epidural hematoma: case report.

    A 74 year-old patient with a nocturnal onset of neck and chest pain was brought to an emergency clinic. physical examination and cardiac assessment were normal. Three hours after the addmittance, a flaccid paralysis of the four limbs supervened. Suspecting of an unusual onset of central nervous system infection, a lumbar puncture was performed, yielding 20 ml of normal cerebrospinal fluid. Thirty oinutes after the puncture, the patient completely regained neurological funcion. He was then referred to a General Hospital where a computed tomography (CT) scan was done showing a large cervical epidural bleeding in the posterolateral region of C4/C5 extending to C7/Th1, along with a C6 vertebral body hemangioma. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the same CT findings. A normal selective angiography of vertebral arteries, carotid arteries and thyreocervical trunk was carried out. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (ASSEH) is a rare but dramatic cause of neurological impairment. In this article we report a fortunate case of complete recovery after an unusual spine cord decompression. We also review the current literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of ASSEH.
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3/7. mycoplasma pneumoniae causing nervous system lesion and SIADH in the absence of pneumonia.

    A patient was admitted for fever and acute respiratory failure (ARF), rapidly progressive tetraparesis, delirium, behavioral abnormalities, and diplopia. leukocytosis and a rise in c-reactive protein were present. A syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) was also diagnosed. Lumbar puncture yielded colorless CFS with mononuclear pleocytosis and protein rise. electrodiagnosis revealed demyelinating polyneuropathy and axonal degeneration. serum IgG and IgM for mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) was consistent with acute infection, and erythromycin was started with rapid resolution of symptoms. Contrarily to most reports, an associated respiratory disease was not present and SIADH in association with MP has been reported only once, in a patient without direct central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Differential diagnosis and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed.
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4/7. Spontaneous spinal hematomas and low-molecular-weight heparin. Report of four cases and review of the literature.

    The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of spontaneous spinal hematomas that develop after administration of low-molecular-weight heparin therapy. The authors describe four patients in whom these hematomas developed without precipitating events while receiving a treatment dose of enoxaparin (Clexane) (approximately 1 mg/kg). Spontaneous spinal hematomas (not related to trauma, surgery, or lumbar puncture) are a rare clinical entity. Several causes have been identified, including acquired and congenital clotting abnormalities and underlying vascular lesions. aspirin, warfarin, tissue plasminogen activator, and heparin have all been implicated in causing spinal hematomas. Concerns regarding the use of low-molecular-weight heparin agents in neuraxis anesthesia have been well documented. Their possible contribution to nontraumatic spinal hematomas has been less well described. The authors believe that low-molecular-weight heparin agents present a small but significant risk of spinal hematoma. This should be considered when prescribing therapy because such a complication may be catastrophic.
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5/7. Transient quadriplegia following re-puncture of tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

    We present a case of a laryngectomized patient who underwent re-puncture of tracheo-oesophageal fistula for speaking valve voice restoration, resulting in a previously unreported inherent complication of this procedure: extradural abscess of the cervical spine with transient quadriplegia.
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6/7. spinal cord dysfunction with quadriplegia complicating pneumococcal meningitis.

    A case of pneumococcal meningitis complicated by brain-stem herniation and flaccid quadriplegia is described, from which the patient, an 11 year old boy, made a partial recovery. The patient had suffered a head injury with skull fracture some years previously; this was his third episode of meningitis. The aetiology of the quadriplegia has not been fully established, but is presumed to be of vascular nature at spinal cord level, associated with an acute hypotensive episode. Preventative aspects of recurrent bacterial meningitis and brain-stem herniation following lumbar puncture are stressed.
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7/7. quadriplegia secondary to hematoma after lateral C-1, C-2 puncture in a leukemic child.

    Epidural, subdural, and intramedullary hemorrhage developed after lateral cervical (C-1, C-2) puncture in a thrombocytopenic patient with meningeal leukemia and increased intracranial pressure. Aggressive platelet support before the procedure did not prevent the hemorrhagic complication. Complete recovery from total motor paralysis with respiratory arrest followed immediate surgical decompression and continuing platelet support. The potential dangers of otherwise minor procedures in compromised patients are reiterated. Neurological recovery as seen here argues for immediate surgical intervention with the development of such potentially life-threatening events.
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keywords = puncture
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