Cases reported "Radiculopathy"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/45. Spontaneous chronic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine.

    We report an exceptional description of a spontaneous chronic spinal epidural hematoma presenting as lumbar radiculitis. The computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative findings are presented. We discuss anatomical and pathophysiological considerations that could lead to such a condition. We estimate that spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas located in the ventral space are in fact premembranous or posterior longitudinal ligament hematomas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/45. Migrated disc in the lumbar spinal canal--case report.

    A 49-year-old man who had complained of back pain for 20 years presented with numbness and pain in his left leg persisting for 6 weeks. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a peripherally enhanced intraspinal mass at the L-3 level. The mass was completely removed. The operative and histological findings revealed degenerated disc fragments surrounded by granulation tissue. His symptoms were completely relieved. Migrated disc should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with a long history of back pain and an intraspinal mass.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/45. Acute postoperative aggravation of radiculopathy as a complication of free fat transplantation in lumbar disc surgery: case report.

    This case report illustrates a rare case of motor weakness caused by a free fat graft herniation. A 40-year-old woman who had undergone surgery for a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc experienced right lower leg weakness. On magnetic resonance image (MRI) a herniated free fat graft was noted. An emergent operation was performed and the herniated fat graft was removed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered well with improvement of the motor weakness. MRI is a good method for diagnosis of fat graft herniation. The mechanisms of this complication have been documented, and the size of the fat graft plays an important role. The methods for prevention of this herniation are also discussed. Although the transplantation of adipose tissue has many advantages, including the prevention of postoperative epidural fibrosis, great care is needed when applying a fat graft intra-operatively. When a postoperative neurologic deficit develops, herniation of the fat graft must be considered. An emergent operation is the treatment of choice for this particular complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/45. Thyroid carcinoma with isolated spinal metastasis: case history and review of the literature.

    An unusual case of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer presenting with symptoms of a radiculopathy at C6 is presented. The patient underwent a laminectomy and removal of tumor with resolution of his symptoms. He was found to have a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma and subsequently had total thyroidectomy and 131I treatment. This patient's presentation raised questions about appropriate preoperative evaluation in this clinical scenario. This case highlights the importance of a thorough pre-operative work up for metastatic spine tumors. This should include evaluation of the thyroid consisting of thorough clinical history with particular attention to prior radiation exposure. palpation of the thyroid also should be included as part of a routine pre-operative physical in cases of metastatic lesions of unknown origin. Thyroid function studies should not be utilized unless a clinical suspicion for thyroid cancer is raised during the examination.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/45. Spinal nerve root repair and reimplantation of avulsed ventral roots into the spinal cord after brachial plexus injury.

    OBJECT: The authors review the first series of 10 cases in which injured intraspinal brachial plexus were surgically repaired. They describe the technique of spinal cord implantation or repair of ruptured nerve roots, as well as patient outcome. methods: Spinal root repair/implantation was performed from 10 days to 9 months postinjury. There were nine male patients and one female patient. Postoperatively in most cases, regeneration of motor neurons from the spinal cord to denervated muscles could be demonstrated. The first signs of regeneration were noted approximately 9 to 12 months postoperatively. Useful function with muscle power of at least Medical research Council Grade 3 occurred in three of 10 cases. Magnetic brain stimulation studies revealed a normal amplitude and latency from the cortex to reinnervated muscles on surgically treated and control sides. A certain degree of cocontraction between antagonistic muscles (for example, biceps-triceps) compromised function. With time there was a reduction of cocontractions, probably due to spinal cord plasticity. In these cases there was also, surprisingly, a return of sensory function, although the mechanism by which this occurred is uncertain. Sensory stimulation (thermal and mechanical) within the avulsed dermatomes was perceived abnormally and/or experienced at remote sites. There was some return of patients' sense of joint position. CONCLUSIONS: A short time lag between the accident and the surgery was recognized as a significant factor for a successful outcome. Reimplantation of avulsed nerve roots may be combined with other procedures such as nerve transfers in severe cases of brachial plexus injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/45. Vascular reconstruction of a vertebral artery loop causing cervical radiculopathy and vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Case report.

    The authors present the case of a 62-year-old man with a 4-month history of progressive left-sided C-5 radiculopathy and dizziness. neuroimaging studies revealed a looped vertebral artery (VA) that had migrated into the widened left C4-5 intervertebral foramen. The patient underwent vascular reconstruction of the VA loop, in which there was minimal manipulation of the C-5 nerve root, via a left-sided anterolateral approach after a balloon occlusion test. Postoperatively the patient's symptoms improved immediately, and there were no signs of recurrence within the 2-year follow-up period. This excellent outcome supports the belief that a proper surgical reconstruction of the compressive, tortuous VA should be the therapeutic option of choice, which carries a lower risk of the nerve root injury and improves the hemodynamics in the posterior circulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/45. Intraneural monophasic synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVES: To illustrate a rare case of synovial sarcoma arising within a peripheral nerve. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A synovial sarcoma arising within a peripheral nerve is very unusual. Only five cases of primary synovial sarcoma within a peripheral nerve have been reported. This is the first case with involvement of the nerve root. The authors diagnosed the tumor arising within the S1 nerve root as synovial sarcoma using cytogenetic analysis that detected the chimeric SYT/SSX gene. methods: In addition to the immunohistochemical study, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was conducted for the SYT-SS10 fusion gene using archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. RESULTS: Computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging performed before surgery, and the intraoperative findings showed that the tumor was embedded within the S1 nerve root. Although the histologic findings were suggestive of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, the results of the cytologic study confirmed its diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. CONCLUSION: Primary intraneural synovial sarcoma, although rare, must be distinguished from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The molecular assay of the detection of the SYT/SSX fusion gene is useful to make a definite diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/45. Multiple independent, sequential, and spontaneously resolving lumbar intervertebral disc herniations: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report is presented. OBJECTIVE: To highlight the potential for spontaneous resolution of large extruded intervertebral lumbar disc herniations in a patient with three independent herniations. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The most effective methods of treatment for lumbar intervertebral disc herniations remain in question. This is partly because the potential for intrinsic spontaneous resolution is not understood, and because many believe that large extruded lumbar intervertebral disc herniations require surgical intervention. This case report addresses both issues. methods: A case is reported and the literature is reviewed. RESULTS: In the patient described, multiple independent lumbar intervertebral disc herniations resolved spontaneously both clinically and radiographically with nonoperative treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Not only is the question concerning the cause of disc herniation unresolved, but the best methods of treatment also are generally unclear. This case report documents a patient with the intrinsic capability not only to herniate multiple lumbar intervertebral discs, but also to resolve them clinically and anatomically. Extruded lumbar intervertebral disc herniations may be treated without surgery, as highlighted by this case report. The immunohistologic pathomechanism for resorption remains unclear.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/45. Partial lumbosacral kyphosis reduction, decompression, and posterior lumbosacral transfixation in high-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis: clinical and radiographic results in six patients.

    BACKGROUND: In an attempt to increase fusion while decreasing the neurologic risk associated with complete reduction of high-grade spondylolisthesis, the authors have used a technique of partial lumbosacral kyphosis reduction, posterior decompression, and pedicle screw transfixation of the lumbosacral junction. OBJECTIVE: To determine if this technique is effective in treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review of six patients with high-grade spondylolisthesis treated by this technique was performed. There were four female patients (ages 16 years [n=2], 23 years [n=1], and 29 years [n=1]) and two male patients (both 13 years of age) with spondylolisthesis ranging from Grade IV to Grade V. All patients presented with pain and radiculopathy. After surgery the patients were evaluated for resolution of symptoms, sagittal alignment, fusion, and satisfaction. The radiographic measurements included the slip angle, the percentage slip, and the sacral inclination. An SRS outcome score was also obtained on all six patients to evaluate postoperative outcome, in terms of pain control, self-image perception, and return to function. RESULTS: The average length of follow-up was 42.6 months (range 24-60 months). All patients evidenced solid fusion by the 6-month follow-up (based on oblique radiographs showing lateral bridging bone masses). The slip angle was improved from 62 degrees to 28 degrees (P < 0.5), whereas there was no significant improvement in the percentage slip or the sacral inclination (89-80% and 28-37 degrees, respectively). No progression of the slip angle or percentage slip was noted on the follow-up radiographs. Complications included two intraoperative dural tears that were identified and repaired. There were no neurologic complications. The SRS outcome instrument demonstrated good postoperative pain control, function, self-image, and satisfaction in all patients. CONCLUSION: In high-grade spondylolisthesis, this posterior approach is safe and effective in obtaining a solid arthrodesis, restoring sagittal balance, and improving function. These results reinforce the impression that it is the partial reduction of the slip angle, not the percentage slip, in high-grade spondylolisthesis that is important in obtaining optimal results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/45. Lumboradiculopathy due to epidural varices: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    Lumbar radicular pain caused by epidural varices is rare. Its incidence is evaluated at 4.5% of operations for disc herniation. We report 2 cases which were only diagnosed during surgery for a herniated disk as is usually observed in the literature. The mechanism behind radicular pain is not fully understood. It may be compression by the varix itself but it may also be secondary to diffculty in venous return. Several anatomical types are described: thrombosed varix (type 1), non thrombosed varix (type 2), localized hematoma (type 3). Our 2 cases corresponded to type 2. The diagnosis can established by MRI at the pre-operative stage. The images vary according to the anatomical type and the age of the lesions. Treatment is by surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Radiculopathy'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.