Cases reported "Radius Fractures"

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1/27. Non-union of undisplaced radial neck fracture in a rheumatoid patient.

    Non-union of an undisplaced fracture of the radial neck in a rheumatoid patient is presented. Possible causes are discussed, and the literature reviewed.
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2/27. Salvage of the head of the radius after fracture-dislocation of the elbow. A case report.

    We describe a patient with a Mason type-III fracture of the head of the radius associated with traumatic dislocation of the elbow. The radial head was intact throughout its circumference despite being completely detached from the shaft and devoid of any soft-tissue attachments. Severe comminution of the radial neck prevented reconstruction by internal fixation and precluded prosthetic replacement of the head. The head was fixed to the shaft with a tricortical iliac-crest bone graft which replaced the neck. Two years later, the patient had a stable elbow with flexion from 10 degrees to 130 degrees. Radiologically, the head of the radius appeared to be viable and the bone graft had incorporated.
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3/27. Bilateral radial head and neck fractures.

    Isolated radial head and neck fractures comprise 1-2% of all fractures seen by physicians. Although bilateral distal radial fractures have been documented, primarily in gymnasts, no literature is present on bilateral radial head or neck fractures. This article presents two such patients who sustained nondisplaced bilateral radial head or neck fractures resulting from falls on outstretched hands. The detection, classification, and treatment options of radial head fractures is reviewed.
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4/27. Nonunion of fracture of the neck of the radius: a report of three cases.

    Nonunion of a radial neck fracture is uncommon. Our report of three cases aims to highlight the fact that this complication is possible following such a fracture in adults. Appropriate clinical and radiologic follow-up is necessary to make sure such nonunion not missed. Surgical fixation (when nonunion of radial neck fracture is suspected) or excision of the radial head may be necessary if the complication is symptomatic. When associated with an ulna fracture, the threshold for internal fixation of both fractures must be lower.
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5/27. Fractures of the proximal radial head and neck in children with emphasis on those that involve the articular cartilage.

    This is a review of 116 children who had a fracture of the proximal radial head or neck over a 15-year period. Of 33 teenagers with closed physes, 17 (52%) had intraarticular involvement. Of 83 younger children with an open proximal radial physis, six (7%) had an intraarticular fracture (Salter-Harris type III or IV). Of the 17 patients with closed physes and intraarticular fracture, 13 had adequate follow-up. There were eight excellent, three good, one fair, and one poor results. Of the six children with open physes and intraarticular fracture, there were one good and five poor results. This study confirms that intraarticular fracture of the radial head is much more common if the proximal radial physis is closed. In addition, this review indicates that the prognosis is extremely poor for children who have a radial head intraarticular fracture that also involves an open physis (Salter-Harris types III and IV), particularly when the fracture is treated initially nonoperatively. Displaced proximal radial fractures that involve both physeal and articular cartilage may be occult, and as with all physeal and intraarticular fractures, anatomic reduction (open if necessary) is mandatory.
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6/27. arthrography for reduction of a fracture of the radial neck in a child with a non-ossified radial epiphysis.

    A fracture of the neck of the radius when the head is not ossified can be difficult to assess and treat. In a four-year-old child we suspected from the radiographs that there was an O'Brien type-III injury after trauma. Partial manual reduction of the non-ossified radial head was completed using the Metaizeau technique of intramedullary Kirschner (K-) wiring aided by intraoperative arthrography. The child had a full range of movement at the elbow and wrist when reviewed 11 weeks after the injury, three weeks after removal of the K-wire. We suggest that intraoperative arthrography is a useful complement to the Metaizeau technique for successful reduction of fractures of the radial neck in the presence of a non-ossified radial head.
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7/27. Three epiphyseal fractures (distal radius and ulna and proximal radius) and a diaphyseal ulnar fracture in a seven-year-old child's forearm.

    SUMMARY: The authors report a rare case of fracture separations at both ends of the radius combined with an epiphyseal and diaphyseal fracture of the ipsilateral ulna. A seven-year-old girl fell one story and sustained a closed injury of her forearm. A closed reduction was unsuccessful, and an open reduction was performed with three of the four fractures being secured with Kirschner wires. These wires were removed one month later, and range-of-motion exercises were started. Thirty months after surgery, both forearms were equal in length, although the proximal radial epiphyseal line appeared partially closed. Joint motions, including forearm rotation, were normal. Radiologically, the ulnar diaphysis and the radial neck were posteriorly convex 20 degrees and 18 degrees, respectively.
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8/27. Irreducible elbow dislocation associated with a radial neck fracture: a case report.

    A rare case of an irreducible elbow dislocation is described. We discuss the causes of irreducibility and the treatment options. Intraoperative assessment of joint stability, repair of the lateral collateral ligament and appropriate postoperative management led to an excellent 5-year outcome, obviating the need for an external fixator or a radial head replacement.
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9/27. Simultaneous ipsilateral fractures of distal and proximal ends of the radius.

    We treated a patient with a rare combination of ipsilateral fractures of the distal and proximal ends of the radius. A woman aged 52 years had simultaneous fractures of the distal and proximal ends of the radius (radial head and neck) after she fell from a high place. The fracture of the radial head was treated by open fixation with a cancellous bone screw, and the fractured distal end of the radius was treated by bone graft, with the subsequent application of an external fixator. At the 1-year follow up, the patient had minor residual limitation of forearm pronation and elbow joint extension, but she had no pain on movement, and had a good result based on Cooney's score (90 points).
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
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10/27. Tire explosion injuries to the upper extremity.

    Several articles have been published that bring attention to the destructive potential of tire explosions. Although the severity of tire explosion injuries to the head and neck region is well established, only one previous article has reported injuries to the upper extremity. Fourteen patients with upper extremity tire explosion injuries have been treated by us from 1980 to 1988. Each injury was caused by single-piece wheel assemblies, as opposed to multipiece wheel assemblies, which have traditionally been associated with the injury. Three representative patient reports are discussed. Prevention of this injury can be achieved by increased public awareness, formal industrial safety training, tire servicing with dedicated equipment including restraining devices or barriers, complete evaluation of wheel/tire serviceability before tire mounting, separation of servicing of single and multipiece wheels, and complete tire deflation before servicing.
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