Cases reported "Radius Fractures"

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11/27. Arthroscopic reduction and percutaneous fixation of a radial neck fracture in a child.

    Radial neck fractures are frequent lesions in the developing elbow. For important angular displacement higher than 60 degrees, there are several alternative treatments. We present an unpublished technique of reduction with arthroscopic assistance and percutaneous stabilization that allows one to perform direct pressure to the radial head, better intra-articular evaluation, reduction control, with minimal soft tissue lesion, and reduce the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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12/27. Internal fixation of radial neck fracture in a fracture dislocation of the elbow. A case report.

    A 27-year-old manual laborer presented with dislocation of the right elbow, complete separation of the radial head at the neck level, and avulsion of the coronoid process. Closed reduction of the elbow resulted in ulnohumeral instability. As an alternative to silastic implant, the radial head was reduced, internally fixed, and used as a spacer to restore elbow stability. The radial head fracture healed with no sequelae. At two years follow-up examination, the patient had a stable elbow with nearly full range of motion.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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13/27. Proximal radioulnar transposition in an elbow dislocation.

    Proximal radioulnar transposition in an elbow dislocation is rare. Only three cases have been recorded. Translocation can easily be missed unless radiographs are carefully examined. Proximal radioulnar translocation has been believed to be iatrogenic. The injury we report was not iatrogenic, and mechanical locking of radial head and neck fracture necessitated open reduction.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
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14/27. Distal radioulnar joint dislocation in association with elbow injuries.

    Traumatic distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) dislocation with or without an associated fracture is a rare injury. When coupled with a radial head fracture this is commonly known as the Essex-Lopresti injury. We report two cases of elbow dislocation with ipsilateral radial neck fractures and associated true DRUJ dislocations. This has not been previously described in the literature. In elbow injuries with wrist involvement, symptoms in the latter may be subtle. Due to inadequate examination of the affected joint, poor initial radiographic views, and general rarity of this injury, distal radioulnar joint dislocations are frequently missed. We hope our experience illustrates the need to examine thoroughly the joint above and below the injured site, and to be aware of the potential for DRUJ instability in all patients with elbow injuries.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
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15/27. Anterior dislocation of the radial head with fractures of the olecranon and radial neck in a young child: a Monteggia equivalent fracture-dislocation variant.

    We present a case of a type I Monteggia equivalent lesion in a 7-year-old child consisting of anterior dislocation of the radial head, radial neck fracture, and a fracture of the olecranon without an associated fracture of the ulnar diaphysis or metaphysis. After a review of the literature, we report this fracture pattern as a rare type I Monteggia equivalent fracture-dislocation variant. This report describes delayed surgical treatment and outcome after close follow-up of a rare type I Monteggia equivalent lesion. Diagnostic challenges with and treatment options for pediatric Monteggia equivalent fracture-dislocations are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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16/27. The Essex-Lopresti lesion: a variant with a bony distal radioulnar joint injury.

    The Essex-Lopresti lesion is an unusual injury, consisting of a radial head or neck fracture, distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) injury and interosseous membrane rupture. To date, all reported Essex-Lopresti lesions have consisted of soft tissue injuries at the DRUJ. We present a case of an Essex-Lopresti lesion with a bony variant, in which the DRUJ injury consisted of an ulnar head fracture associated with radial head fracture and acute proximal migration of the radius. The management involved plating of the ulnar head fracture and titanium replacement of the radial head.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
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17/27. A novel technique for the prophylactic plating of the osteocutaneous radial forearm flap donor site.

    The osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap (ORFFF) provides a suitable composite construct for reconstruction of head and neck defects. Initial acceptance of the ORFFF during the 1980s waned significantly as long-term outcome studies demonstrated a high incidence of donor-site fractures associated with harvesting a segment of the cortical radius. Biomechanical and clinical studies have demonstrated a significant improvement in the mechanical strength of ostectomized long bones after prophylactic plating. Our case report identifies a novel technique for rigid fixation using a low-contact, locking-screw plating system (LCP, Synthes USA). The system provides a fixed-angle construct using a locking-screw system that provides appropriate axial load transfer using unicortical screw fixation.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neck
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18/27. Irreducible radial neck fracture in a child.

    Pediatric radial neck fractures are relatively common injuries resulting from a fall onto an outstretched arm. However, radial neck fractures with medial displacement of the shaft are difficult and fortunately rare injuries, having only been described twice in the literature. This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a pediatric elbow fracture where the radial shaft displaced medial to the coronoid process and pierced the joint capsule, requiring open reduction with internal fixation.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = neck
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19/27. Fell on outstretched hand.

    Radial neck fractures in children are not uncommon. Most are minimally displaced or nondisplaced. Severely displaced fractures or angulated radial neck fractures in children often have poor outcomes, especially if not reduced, and even after open reduction.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = neck
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20/27. Radial neck fracture complicating closed reduction of a posterior elbow dislocation in a child: case report.

    A case of radial neck fracture complicating repeated attempts at closed reduction of a posterior elbow dislocation in a child is described. This case underscores the necessity of using proper technique when reducing posterior elbow dislocations. The mechanism of radial neck fracture in association with posterior elbow dislocation is discussed.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = neck
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