Cases reported "Radius Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Triplane fractures in the hand.

    Two new cases of triplane fracture of the distal tibia are reported in the proximal phalanx of the thumb and the distal radius, respectively, of a 12-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy. Neither fracture showed any displacement, achieving healing at 4 weeks of external immobilization. Triplane fractures can occur across growth plates other than the distal tibia. Because of the rapid physiologic physeal arrest, the potential for growth deformity is null. In cases without displacement, these fractures should be treated conservatively by external immobilization, as one would treat a one-plane fracture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. Flexon-type Salter-Harris I injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis.

    The authors report a case of a flexion-type epiphyseal separation of the proximal tibia. The injury described herein is a displaced Salter-Harris type I injury. literature pertaining to this rare injury is reviewed, and management options are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. forearm pseudarthrosis--neurofibromatosis: case report.

    A 3 1/2-year-old white girl with neurofibromatosis sustained left radius and ulna fractures. The radius was sclerotic with no medullary canal at the fracture site, and the ulna was hypoplastic distal to the fracture. The fractures failed to unite when immobilized in a long arm plaster cast for 5 months and pseudarthrosis developed. Three subsequent operative attempts to obtain union of the pseudarthrosis by means of internal fixation and bone grafting over the next 30 months were also unsuccessful, and the pseudarthrosis persisted. The forearm was supported in a custom molded leather brace until the child was 13 1/2 years old and had reached skeletal maturity. Osseous union was then operatively obtained using dual onlay tibial cortical and cancellous bone grafts. There has been no recurrence of the pseudarthrosis 3 years and 2 months after bone grafting. The author recommends postponing surgical attempts to achieve union of the forearm bone pseudarthrosis associated with neurofibromatosis until the patient reaches skeletal maturity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Triplane fracture of the distal radius.

    A case of triplane fracture of the distal radius is reported in a 13-year-old boy. This exceptional fracture showed displacement, and was healed by closed reduction and 6 weeks of external immobilization. Eighteen months later, the patient showed complete physeal arrest of the distal radius, with radio-ulnar length discrepancy but without any repercussion on wrist mobility. The patient was declared asymptomatic 3 years after the injury. Prompt, physiological physeal arrest reduces the potential of growth deformity. These fractures must be treated conservatively by closed reduction (if displacement exists) and external immobilization, just like a normal one-plane fracture. We may suppose that final radio-ulnar discrepancy could lead to a painful and symptomatic ulno-carpal conflict in adult life. The following characteristics can be associated with this rare fracture: (1) occurrence close to the end of the growth period, as in other types of triplane fractures; (2) evolution towards partial or complete growth arrest of the physis, not requiring treatment and (3) stability of the fracture after closed reduction. In the present case, as in the other reported cases, it may also be added that orthopaedic treatment has been the rule, in contrast with triplane fractures occurring in the distal tibia, in which surgical treatment is indicated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Osseous lesions and pathologic fractures in congenital cytomegalic inclusion disease: report of a case.

    A newborn infant with congenital cytomegalic inclusion disease had spontaneous fractures of the distal radii bilaterally, and involvement of the metaphyseal portions of the humeri, ulnas, femurs, and tibias. The fractures healed promptly without complications under ordinary management. At the present time, one can only speculate on the cause of these lesions. Viral osteomyelitis, osteomalacia secondary to hepatitis and malabsorption and a disturbance of endochondral ossification are all possibilities. There is a need for additional cases with histologic and biochemical studies of the bone lesions in congenital cytomegalic inclusion disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Correlation of postoperative bone scintigraphy with healing of vascularized fibula transfer: a clinical study.

    This study examines the usefulness and reliability of bone scintigraphy in correlation with radiological and clinical evidence of bone healing in 15 patients who underwent microvascular transfer of the fibula. All patients were followed for a minimum of 18 months postoperatively. technetium-99 methylene diphosphonate bone scans and the most recent radiographs were blindly rereviewed. Bone scintigraphic results were characterized as (1) clearly positive (i.e., excellent visualization of the fibula), (2) clearly negative (i.e., no evidence of tracer uptake in the fibula), or (3) indeterminate (i.e., artifact present as a result of metallic or soft tissue interference). Bone radiographs were classified into three typical patterns: (1) complete bony union and graft hypertrophy, (2) incomplete union (either distal or proximal) requiring a second procedure), and (3) nonunion, with increased proximal and distal lucency (with or without pathological fracture) and loss of graft definition. Eleven patients had positive scintigraphic scans postoperatively. In 8 no subsequent procedure was necessary; 2 patients required additional bone grafts to augment the osseous reconstruction; viable fibulas were seen at reoperation. One patient with a positive scan showed decreased graft definition at four months followed by autograft fracture. Three patients had indeterminate scans, 2 of whom evidenced uncomplicated clinical and radiological union. One patient had a clearly negative scan and ultimately tibia-fibula synostosis was required to attain stability. Bone scintigraphy appears to correlate with survival, but not necessarily union, of a vascularized fibula autograft. Additional monitoring techniques should be used in combination with a one-time bone scan to both monitor the patency of the microanastomoses and to prioritize the orthopedic management of the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Fractured long bones in a term infant delivered by cesarian section.

    A term infant was delivered uneventfully by repeat Cesarian section. At the age of 1 week there was clinical and radiographic evidence of fractures of the left tibia and right radius. The fractures most likely occurred during the cesarian section. Birth trauma should not be excluded on the basis of Cesarian section delivery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Transient fatty cortical defects following fractures in children.

    Self-regressing subperiosteal defects appearing during consolidation of fractures were observed in two children aged 6 and 10 years, in the tibia and the radius respectively. These transient defects appeared several weeks after fracture, at a distance from the fracture site. They involved the newly formed subperiosteal bone, did not enlarge, and were replaced progressively by normal-appearing bone. A computed tomography (CT) study performed on one of these defects demonstrated a density consistent with a fatty content. It is suggested that these transient post-traumatic defects could result from the inclusion of medullary fat drops within the subperiosteal hematoma near the fracture site.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. The development of post-traumatic cyst-like lesions in bone.

    Cyst-like lesions in the radius and tibia were observed in two children as a post-fracture event. The pathogenesis of these lesions is discussed. Cut sections from anatomic specimens display extensive hemorrhage in subperiosteal as well as endosteal and trabecular bone. cysts arising from hemorrhagic resorption in various locales may explain the occasional atypical appearance of these lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Management of massive defects in radius and ulna following wringer injury. A case report.

    An unusual case of wringer injury in a 29-month-old child demonstrates extensive loss of the diaphysis of both the radius and ulna. Reconstruction consisted of cortico-cancellous autogenous tibial bone grafting of the radius and ulna in two stages. Follow-up of 24 years showed remodeling and good alignment of the entire radius and ulna, culminating in a good functional and cosmetic result. Extensive soft tissue damage and decreased blood supply result in bone necrosis. There is no reason to bone graft the radius and ulna at the same time.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Radius Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.