Cases reported "Ranula"

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1/8. Plunging ranula: a case report and a literature review.

    The plunging ranula is a mucous extravasation cyst of the sublingual gland. It is slightly more common in females, shows no side preference, and is more prevalent in the second and third decades of life. It typically manifests as a painless, nonmobile swelling in the neck and in four of five cases is associated with an intraoral ranula or swelling. If there is no history of an oral ranula the clinical diagnosis is difficult, and it may be left to the reporting pathologist to give the correct diagnosis. The histologic appearance is characteristically of a cyst, devoid of epithelium or endothelium, with a vascular fibro-connective tissue wall containing some chronic inflammatory cells and macrophages stuffed with mucin. The correct diagnosis is essential for the most effective treatment, which is excision of the sublingual gland.
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2/8. Submandibular cystic hygroma resembling a plunging ranula in a neonate. review and report of a case.

    Cystic hygromas are large lymphangiomas that are most often found in the posterior triangle of the neck and the axilla in children. They are most frequently found before age 2 and may be massive. After upper respiratory infection, they may become infected and enlarged, causing dysphagia and toxemia. The diagnosis can usually be made by history and physical examination and confirmed by biopsy. Treatment is by surgical excision of small lesions and staged debulking excisions in more severe cases. A patient with a cystic hygroma having many clinical characteristics of a plunging ranula is presented. The cyst fluid was aspirated and analyzed for its amylase, sodium, potassium, chloride, urea nitrogen, glucose, and total protein content. The characteristics of the fluid were also compared with those of lymph and saliva. This report demonstrates the difficulty in determining the diagnosis of a tumor that has the clinical features of a cystic hygroma, as well as a plunging ranula. The necessity of a proper presurgical diagnosis is essential since the form of therapy for each is different and conflicting. A method that distinguishes between the cervical cystic hygroma and a plunging ranula by means of aspirated fluid is discussed.
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3/8. The plunging ranula. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and management.

    Ranulas are cysts resulting from retention, or extravasation of saliva from the sublingual gland. Two varieties are described: a superficial or oral ranula and a cervical or plunging ranula. The plunging ranula is located below the mylohyoid muscle and may present as a swelling in the upper part of the neck. Four cases are described to illustrate that this condition can be the cause of a neck swelling. Aetiology, differential diagnosis and surgical management are also discussed. Recurrences are mainly due to unfamiliarity with this phenomenon and ignorance of its aetiology. Successful treatment of the plunging ranula consists of excision of the ipsilateral sublingual salivary gland, which is the source of this disorder, and intra-oral evacuation of the pseudocyst of the neck swelling. There is no need for an extensive neck dissection of the cervical extension.
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4/8. Plunging ranula: a report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Three cases of plunging ranula are reported and the literature reviewed. Extravasation of saliva from the sublingual gland due to trauma or obstruction of its ducts appears to be the most likely cause of plunging ranula. Available data suggest that the submandibular gland is usually not involved, although at the time of surgery it may be extremely difficult to exclude a submandibular origin of the cyst in the neck. communication between the oral and cervical components of the plunging ranula probably occur via a hiatus in the mylohyoid muscle. Such communication passing directly into the submandibular compartment may simulate submandibular gland involvement. Since 1910, 139 procedures in 89 patients with plunging ranula have been reported in the English literature. The recurrence rate was 70 per cent after incision and drainage of the cyst, 53 per cent after marsupialization, 85 per cent after excision of the cyst in the neck and 2 per cent after excision of the sublingual gland via the cervical or intra-oral route. This review suggests that excision of the sublingual gland with intra-oral drainage of the cervical swelling appears to be the treatment of choice for the plunging ranula.
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5/8. Cervical ranula.

    Ranulas are mucous extravasation cysts, and usually originate from the sublingual salivary gland. They may occasionally infiltrate the tissue planes of the neck and present as a cervical tumour. The literature is reviewed, and four personal cases of cervical ranula presented. Successful treatment may be achieved in the vast majority of cases by removal of the sublingual salivary gland.
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6/8. Venous malformation of the neck secondary to a plunging ranula of the mouth.

    An unusual case of plunging ranula, with development into a venous malformation, is presented. The patient was successfully treated by excision of one venous aneurysm and malformation and submandibular gland in one session followed by exteriorization of ranula and removal of a sublingual gland two months later.
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7/8. Cystic lymphangioma and plunging ranula treated by OK-432 therapy: a report of two cases.

    Among head and neck angiotumors, cystic lymphangioma occurs in infancy in most cases and it is rare in adulthood. Plunging ranula is one of the diseases which need to be distinguished from lymphangioma, though operation is the first choice therapy for both of these. In the present study, we report on 2 cases in whom we conducted intralesional injection of OK-432 for cervical lymphangioma and ranula found in 20 and 35 year-old female patients. We obtained excellent improvement. First of all, we punctured the tumors and sucked out the liquid content as much as possible, and then used OK-432 in the same volumes to those drawn out. No swelling was observed in either patient after 1 month, and cysts disappeared in CT 4 and 12 months after injection, respectively; at present, the prognosis is satisfactory, without recurrence. The intralesional injection of OK-432 is considered an effective method, as the speed of complete disappearance by this therapy is high. Cosmetically it is superb, leaving no lesions in the skin of the injection site.
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8/8. ranula and the sublingual salivary glands.

    The term "ranula" is poorly understood and is frequently applied to a variety of cystic structures in the head and neck. Ranulas classically are cysts of salivary gland origin, usually the sublingual glands, of which two varieties are described: a simple, epithelial lined cyst resulting from ductal obstruction, and a pseudocyst without epithelial lining resulting from extravasation of saliva that dissects through the tissue planes of the neck and may appear as a neck mass. Four cases are presented that illustrate the difficulties in diagnosis; treatment consists of meticulous dissection of the thin-walled sac in continuity with the excision of the sublingual glands that are the origin of these lesions.
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