Cases reported "Ranula"

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11/37. Plunging ranula: a case report and a literature review.

    The plunging ranula is a mucous extravasation cyst of the sublingual gland. It is slightly more common in females, shows no side preference, and is more prevalent in the second and third decades of life. It typically manifests as a painless, nonmobile swelling in the neck and in four of five cases is associated with an intraoral ranula or swelling. If there is no history of an oral ranula the clinical diagnosis is difficult, and it may be left to the reporting pathologist to give the correct diagnosis. The histologic appearance is characteristically of a cyst, devoid of epithelium or endothelium, with a vascular fibro-connective tissue wall containing some chronic inflammatory cells and macrophages stuffed with mucin. The correct diagnosis is essential for the most effective treatment, which is excision of the sublingual gland.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gland
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12/37. Marsupialization for treatment of oral ranula: a second look at the procedure.

    Simple marsupialization to manage oral ranula has fallen into disfavor because of excessive failures and the high incidence of iatrogenically caused cervical ranula that may follow this procedure. With the simple addition of packing the entire pseudocystic cavity with gauze after its unroofing, the rate of recurrence is minimized. It is recommended that oral ranula be treated initially by marsupialization with packing and, if recurrence occurs, then the offending sublingual gland should be excised.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = gland
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13/37. Papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the sublingual gland presenting as a ranula.

    A case is reported of a papillary cystadenocarcinoma of the sublingual gland which presented as a ranula. This is both rare in site and mode of presentation.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = gland
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14/37. Acinic cell carcinoma found by recurrence of a mucous cyst in the sublingual gland.

    This case report describes an acinic cell carcinoma found by a recurrence of a ranula in the sublingual gland. A 42-year-old male was admitted to the hospital of the tokyo Dental College with a swelling in his right oral floor but without pain. The lesion was treated by windowing the same day under the diagnosis of a ranula, but the swelling appeared again at the same area eight months after the first operation. A resection was performed, and the specimen was sent to the clinical laboratory for pathological diagnosis. Proliferating serous cells were seen in part of the wall of an exudative mucous cyst. PAS staining was partially positive, and immunohistochemical staining for S-100 protein, lactoferrin, and amylase were also positive in cytoplasmic granules. This report concludes that the pathological diagnosis is beneficial in clarifying the reasons for the recurrence of a benign lesion.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = gland
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15/37. Pediatric intraoral ranulas: an analysis of nine cases.

    An intraoral ranula is a retention cyst arises from the sublingual gland on the floor of the mouth as a result of ductal obstruction and fluid retention. Many techniques for management of ranulas have been described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to analyze our surgically treated pediatric patients with intraoral ranulas and to discuss the results in the light of the literature. Nine pediatric patients (six females and three males) with intraoral ranulas surgically treated were analyzed retrospectively regarding their treatment methods and results. The surgical specimens were also re-examined histologically. Seven cases of superficial, protruded and smaller than 2 cm ranulas were treated with marsupialization (unroofing). Two cases who were previously operated and then recurred had bigger than 2 cm ranulas. In these two cases, marsupialization of the ranula plus removal of the sublingual gland was performed. The most common complication was intraoperative cyst rupture of the ranula, which was noted in four cases. A recurrence was observed in only one case in the 16th months of follow up period. Our findings show that marsupialization is a suitable and effective method for pediatric intraoral ranulas, whereas in recurrent cases marsupialization of the ranula combined with total excision of sublingual gland may be preferred.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = gland
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16/37. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.
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ranking = 27.773012875003
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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17/37. Sublingual ranula: report of a submandibular clinical case.

    ranula is a raised mucocele on the oral floor. When the mucocele extends and passes the sublingual space and invades the submandibular space it may be called ''plunging ranula''. Its etiology is not completely known. Our clinical case is a clear example: a 10-year old formation, not painful, developed during several years and originally of small dimension located in the sublingual region. The purpose of this study is to underline that the surgical treatment of choice, in these clinical situations, is the drainage of the cavity and marsupialization rather than a radical removal.
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ranking = 40.388727634074
keywords = submandibular
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18/37. Treatment of a ranula using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    A ranula is an extravasational cyst arising from the sublingual gland. The "cyst" cavity does not have an epithelial lining, and because of this is notoriously difficult to eliminate. Usual treatment requires complete excision of the sublingual gland, exteriorizing the gland through establishment of a secondary ductal structure by placement of a long-term indwelling catheter, or packing, all requiring patient compliance. Unroofing alone is often followed by recurrence via resealing or closure with formation of a new roof. The accompanying scarring and damage to additional ducts may also result in recurrence. Combining unroofing with a technique that would prevent resealing of the remaining portion, scarify the base of the ranula to eliminate residual glandular acini, and be more comfortable and non-interfering with the daily activity of the patient, is an acceptable object of treatment of a ranula. The use of a water-based laser system to accomplish these goals appears to be a desirable and simple method.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gland
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19/37. Salivary gland cysts of the oral cavity: clinical observation and surgical management.

    Mucoceles are common cystic lesions of the oral mucosa. Extravasation mucoceles are mainly found in the lower lip of young patients, whereas retention mucoceles are usually located in the cheek or palate of older patients. The disparate site and age incidences of extravasation and retention mucoceles suggest that these two types are not related and have different pathogenesis. Treatment modalities for mucoceles are reviewed, with special attention to the cryosurgical technique for the treatment of oral ranulas.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gland
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20/37. Plunging ranula following bilateral submandibular duct transposition.

    Submandibular duct transposition is now a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of severe drooling. However, this is our first experience of a plunging ranula arising as a complication of the technique. In the surgical management of this complication, the single most important step is excision of the sublingual gland to prevent recurrence.
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ranking = 32.81098210726
keywords = submandibular, gland
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