Cases reported "Rectal Fistula"

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11/23. Perianal mucinous adenocarcinoma: unusual case presentations and review of the literature.

    Perianal mucinous adenocarcinoma is a rare cancer constituting 3 to 11 per cent of all anal carcinomas. It may arise de novo or from a fistula or abscess cavity. We present two cases of this disease process. Case One is a 52-year-old man with a chronic history of perianal abscesses who presented to the emergency room with a large bowel obstruction. He required diversion and wide local excision with lateral internal sphincterotomy for relief of the obstruction. pathology from the excised material revealed the unexpected diagnosis of invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the anus. Case Two is a 59-year-old man with a chronic history of complex fistulas and abscesses who presented to our office with a horseshoe fistula and deep postanal space abscess. Because of the nonhealing nature of the wound, biopsies from the abscess crater, fistulous tract, and the perianal skin opening were taken. The pathology department identified the specimens as invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the anal canal. This is an aggressive cancer often misdiagnosed clinically as benign pathology. A high index of suspicion and biopsy of fistulous tracts and abscesses are the keys to early diagnosis and treatment. With combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in conjunction with aggressive surgical resection long-term survival might be obtained.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
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12/23. radiation-induced rectal cancer originating from a rectocutaneous fistula: report of a case.

    This report describes a patient with radiation-induced rectal cancer with an unusual history. A 51-year-old man was admitted in 2000 because of ichorrhea of the skin on the left loin. The patient had received irradiation for a suspicious diagnosis of a malignant tumor in the pelvic cavity in 1975. A subcutaneous abscess in the right loin appeared in 1989, and rectocutaneous fistula was noted in 1992. Moreover, radiation-induced rectal cancer developed in 2000. Plain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis demonstrated a presacral mass and tumor in the rectum. Finally, we diagnosed the presacral mass to be an abscess attached to the center of the rectal cancer. The rectum was resected by Miles' operation and a colostomy of the sigmoid colon was also performed. Many cases of radiation-induced rectal cancer have been reported. However, this is a rare case of radiation-induced rectal cancer originating from a presacral abscess and rectocutaneous fistula.
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ranking = 93.823585653578
keywords = radiation-induced, cancer
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13/23. Colloid carcinoma arising in an anorectal fistula in Crohn's disease: a case report.

    Carcinoma arising in a chronic anorectal fistula in Crohn's disease is rare, but the association has been reported in the literature. In most cases, it concerns a colloid carcinoma. Probably chronic irritation at either end of a fistula can trigger the degeneration of scar tissue into cancer. The diagnosis is difficult, due to lack of specificity of symptoms and signs, and is often delayed, resulting in a poor prognosis. A 70-year-old female, diagnosed with Crohn's disease at the age of 45, developed a pararectal colloid carcinoma in an anorectal fistula that had existed for years. She was treated with an abdominoperineal resection and adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and levofolinate) but died. A high index of suspicion and regular surveillance is recommended in chronic anorectal fistulas in Crohn's disease. In case of doubt, repeated biopsies should be performed to rule out malignancy.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cancer
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14/23. Laparoscopic rectovesical fistula repair.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Rectovesical fistula (RVF) is a rare complication of radical prostatectomy. A 62- year-old man with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent open radical prostatectomy that was complicated by rectal injury and subsequent RVF development. Conservative management failed, and the patient was referred for surgical correction. TECHNIQUE: The operative steps consisted of (1) cystoscopy, (2) RVF catheterization, (3) ureteral catheterization, (4) five-port transperitoneal laparoscopic approach, (5) cystotomy, (6) opening of the fistulous tract, (7) dissection between the bladder and the rectum, (8) closure of the rectum, (9) interposition of omentum, (10) suprapubic cystostomy placement, (11) bladder closure, and (12) colostomy creation. RESULTS: The operative time was 240 minutes. The hospital stay was 3 days. The urethral catheter was kept indwelling for 4 days. At 8 weeks postoperatively, the suprapubic tube was removed and the colostomy reversed. At 1-month follow-up, the patient remains free of fistula recurrence. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic rectovesical fistula repair is feasible and represents an attractive alternative to the standard approaches.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cancer
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15/23. A case of rectosigmoid cancer metastasizing to a fistula in ano.

    We herein report a case of rectosigmoid cancer metastasizing to a fistula in ano. A 53-year-old man complaining of anal bleeding consulted another hospital. He had been suffering from an anal fistula since 7 years. On the left upper side of the skin surface around the anus a fistula end was seen as a hole that tunneled down into the back passage, although no hard tumor was palpable on the hole. Complete colonoscopy revealed an ulcerative tumor in the rectosigmoid colon. On 5 February 2004, anterior resection and lymphadenectomy was performed. The post-operative pathological diagnosis was rectosigmoid cancer, Type 2, T2, N0, M0, stage II. The anal fistula was a simple type and mucinous discharge was not observed. On 23 February 2004, coring out the anal fistula was performed by the former hospital. Pathological diagnosis of the excised fistula revealed well-differentiated adenocarcinoma; identical to the colon tumor. Immunohistochemical staining of these two lesions were negative for (CK) 7 but staining with CK20 revealed some stained tumor cells in two lesions. We diagnosed this tumor as metastatic adenocarcinoma from a rectosigmoid cancer. Recurrent lesions were not seen during the first year after the first operation.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = cancer
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16/23. Recto-cavernosal fistula after radiation for rectal cancer.

    Rectourethral fistula is a rare, but documented complication of rectal cancer. To our knowledge this is the first report of a recto- cavernosal fistula after chemo-radiotherapy for cancer of the rectum.
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ranking = 3
keywords = cancer
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17/23. Concurrent diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder in a patient with a vesicorectal fistula from invasive rectal cancer.

    A 47-year-old man underwent a low anterior resection of the rectosigmoid colon with en bloc cystoprostatectomy for vesicorectal fistula due to a locally advanced rectal cancer. Histopathological examination of the bladder revealed two additional primary malignancies: urothelial carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of two histologically distinct urothelial malignancies that were diagnosed during a work up of vesicorectal fistula due to adenocarcinoma of the rectum.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cancer
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18/23. Complete closure of cancer-related anovaginal and anoperineal fistulas in locally advanced anal canal carcinomas by upfront intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by combined radiochemotherapy: report of two cases.

    PURPOSE: Cancer-related fistulas are a major problem in locally advanced anal canal carcinoma, because conservative radiochemotherapy may not be recommended in this setting. Therefore, it is usually recommended to proceed to an abdominoperineal resection with definitive colostomy in the presence of such lesions. methods: Because chemotherapy can lead to closure of cancer-related fistulas and local intra-arterial chemotherapy is effective in locally advanced anal canal cancer, we treated two anal canal carcinoma patients presenting with cancer-related fistulas with upfront intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by radiochemotherapy, leading to complete closure of fistulas. RESULTS: Both patients are free of colostomy and in complete remission after more than four years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This conservative approach combining local intra-arterial chemotherapy and standard radiochemotherapy is feasible and should be considered in the management of such locally advanced anal canal carcinoma.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = cancer
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19/23. Jejunal-rectal fistula as a complication of postoperative radiotherapy.

    We present the case of a patient with an unusual, complex enteric fistula with multiple tracts and associated abscesses. The fistula was a late complication of radiotherapy, administered three years earlier, after resection for carcinoma of the sigmoid colon. Most of the small bowel was involved in the radiation-induced disease. A wide resection was performed successfully. This report reviews current literature on intra-abdominal postradiotherapy injuries, particularly intestinal fistulae.
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ranking = 22.330896413394
keywords = radiation-induced
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20/23. Anal carcinoma presenting as a perirectal abscess or fistula.

    In five years, 15 patients were seen with anal carcinomas presenting as perirectal abscesses or fistulas. Nine patients had acute abscesses without histories of chronic anorectal disease, and six patients had long-standing anorectal disease in which carcinoma developed. Operative exploration was needed to establish the diagnosis in all patients. Early definitive surgery would certainly have prevented most if not all of the cancers from developing in the group with chronic anorectal disease.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cancer
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