Cases reported "Rectal Neoplasms"

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1/579. Synchronous and metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma: case report and literature review.

    Whilst synchronous adenocarcinoma of the stomach is well documented, metachronous primary disease is exceedingly rare. We report a man with a family history of colonic and gastric cancer, who underwent a resection of a Duke's C adenocarcinoma of the rectum, aged 56 years, and a proximal partial gastrectomy for synchronous stage 1 gastric adenocarcinomas of the lesser curve, aged 61 years. Nine years later, a metachronous gastric primary was discovered in the gastric remnant, necessitating total gastrectomy. Total gastrectomy is the operation of choice for synchronous gastric primaries as it ensures clearance and prevents metachronous growth. However, it may not be appropriate for all gastric cancer as operative morbidity and mortality are increased, and because synchronicity and metachronicity of gastric cancer are uncommon. Moreover, there are no consistent data to demonstrate a survival advantage for total compared with partial gastrectomy for operable gastric cancer. If, after partial gastrectomy, synchronous disease is detected in the resected specimen (as in this reported case), endoscopic surveillance for metachronous disease is advised, since this may be amenable to surgical cure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
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2/579. A case of chordoma in association with rectal carcinoma.

    A 74-year-old male patient presented with anal and sacral pain 18 months after abdomino-perineal resection for rectal cancer. Computerized tomography (CT) of the pelvis demonstrated a well defined mass anterior to the lower sacrum, posteriorly infiltrating and destroying the fourth and fifth sacral nerves and invading the right gluteal fossa. A 7.5 x 15 x 2 cm encapsulated mass was demonstrated during the operation using a posterior approach and the lower sacral segments together with the tumour were removed by amputation at S3 level. Histopathology revealed chordoma. This case is unique because of the rarity of chordoma in association with rectal tumour at the sacrococcygeal region.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = cancer
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3/579. Myositis and malignancy: is there a true association?

    There may be an association between polymyositis/dermatomyositis and malignant disease. Cancer occurs in patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis with a frequency estimated between 2.5% and 29% (relative risk 1.0 to 6.5). We present two such cases, associated with colorectal carcinoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma respectively, together with an overview of existing controlled studies in the area.
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ranking = 57.170906410926
keywords = colorectal
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4/579. Small-cell carcinoma of the rectum: report of two cases.

    Small-cell carcinoma of the rectum is an infrequent pathologic finding, and its precise incidence is unknown. Its incidence is less than 0.2 percent among all colorectal cancers. This tumor manifests highly aggressive behavior. The treatment of choice is combination chemotherapy similar to that used for small-cell carcinoma of the lung, but in small localized tumors surgery plus chemotherapy is an alternative. We present two cases of small-cell carcinoma of the lower rectum and a review of the literature.
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ranking = 75.838753440282
keywords = colorectal, colorectal cancer, cancer
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5/579. Squamous-cell carcinoma of the colon responsive to combination chemotherapy: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PURPOSE: The majority of colorectal neoplasms diagnosed are adenocarcinomas. Other histologies such as squamous, adenosquamous, carcinoid tumors, or lymphoid tumors are occasionally identified. Given the rarity of squamous-cell tumors, it is very difficult to study their natural course and response to therapy. An attempt is made to describe the frequency, anatomic location, and response to therapy with a review of the literature. methods: From the Cancer Registry at the University of missouri-Columbia Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, tumors of the colon identified above the dentate line were selected for chart review. Data were extracted from cases between the years 1940 and 1996. The key terms used to identify cases were epidermoid, squamous cell, and cancer of the rectum or colon. Using this approach, forty patients were identified and each record was reviewed. RESULTS: The majority of these cases were anal cancers with proximal extension into the rectum and were excluded. Of 4,561 cases of epithelial colon and rectal cancers identified, only one additional case of squamous-cell cancer could be verified. In this report we describe a patient with a primary squamous-cell carcinoma of the sigmoid colon with metastatic disease to the liver at diagnosis who responded to systemic chemotherapy. We believe this to be the first reported case of this rare tumor type in which the patient's tumor responded to systemic chemotherapy. Two cases with a thorough review of literature are presented. CONCLUSIONS: Primary squamous-cell carcinoma of the colon is a rare malignancy of unknown cause and pathogenesis. Metastatic tumors to the colon should be ruled out in all cases before therapy. Early detection and surgery remain the main therapeutic options, but as presented in our case, response to chemotherapy in advanced disease is encouraging.
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ranking = 58.46263728163
keywords = colorectal, neoplasm, cancer
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6/579. Peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis after laparoscopic-assisted anterior resection for early rectal cancer: report of a case.

    Minimally invasive colon surgery has been shown to be both technically feasible and a safe alternative to laparotomy. Its efficacy for the curative resection of colorectal cancer, however, remains controversial. Of major concern are the increasing reports of port-site recurrence after use of laparoscopic techniques in malignant disease. In this article a heretofore unreported complication of peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis after laparoscopic-assisted anterior resection for early stage rectal cancer is presented. Isolated peritoneal recurrence is rare after curative resection of Stage I rectal cancer. The effect of pneumoperitoneum on tumor dissemination is discussed.
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ranking = 77.338753440282
keywords = colorectal, colorectal cancer, cancer
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7/579. Multiple extra-bone accumulations of technetium-99m-HMDP.

    Bone scintigraphy was performed on a woman 2 y and 10 mo after surgery for rectal cancer. Intense extra-bone accumulations of 99mTc-HMDP were visible in an aortic atherosclerosis lesion and in a metastatic liver tumor. Uptake in the metastatic lesion was confirmed by x-ray CT. Uptake in the aortic lesion was shown as typical calcification by x-ray CT.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = cancer
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8/579. Successful transvaginal repair of a rectovaginal fistula developing after double-stapled anastomosis in low anterior resection: report of four cases.

    The management of postoperative rectovaginal fistula (RVF) after low anterior resection for rectal cancer is difficult and the results are often unsatisfactory. Among 140 patients with rectal cancer who underwent low anterior resection with a double-stapled anastomosis at our hospital between 1986 and 1996, 4 (2.9%) developed RVF as a postoperative complication. The RVF developed gradually from 9 to 128 days after low anterior resection. We describe herein our technique of using a modified transvaginal approach for RVF repair with a diverting colostomy. In all four patients, the RVFs were completely eradicated with reestablishment of intestinal continuity and did not recur during the mean follow-up period of 29.5 months, ranging from 12 to 67 months. This report serves to demonstrate that emerging RVFs secondary to stapled anastomosis in low anterior resection for rectal cancer must be recognized, and that a modified transvaginal approach provides an effective method of repair.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = cancer
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9/579. fibrinogen Matsumoto III: a variant with gamma275 Arg-->Cys (CGC-->TGC)--comparison of fibrin polymerization properties with those of Matsumoto I (gamma364 Asp-->His) and Matsumoto II (gamma308 Asn-->Lys).

    fibrinogen Matsumoto III (M-III) is a dysfibrinogen identified in a 66-year-old woman with rectal cancer. The fibrinogen level determined by the thrombin-time method was markedly decreased in preoperative coagulation tests of her plasma. Three fibrinogen polypeptide-chain gene fragments from the proposita were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction method, then sequenced. The triplet CGC encoding the amino acid residue gamma275 was replaced by TGC, resulting in the substitution of Arg->Cys. There have been previous reports of nine families with the same alteration, nine families with an Arg->His variant and one family with an Arg->Ser variant in this residue, which has been shown to be one of the most important amino acids in the 'D:D' interaction site. In addition, there are three silent mutations in the Aalpha-chain gene and two mutations in the intron of the Bbeta-chain and the gamma-chain gene. However, none of these mutations is thought to be the cause of the dysfunctional fibrinogen. The thrombin-catalyzed fibrin polymerization in the presence of 1 mM Ca ions was markedly delayed in purified M-III. Its lag period was longer than those of Matsumoto II (M-II; gamma308Asn->Lys) and Matsumoto I (M-I; gamma364Asp-His). gamma364Asp is one of the most important residues in the polymerization pocket of the 'D:E' interaction site and gamma308Asn is located in the vicinity of a high affinity Ca2 binding site in the D-domain, gamma311-336. The maximum slope of the polymerization curve for M-III was about 4-fold steeper than that for M-1 but less steep than that for M-II. These results may suggest that the tertiary structure of the polymerization pocket plays a more important role in the lateral aggregation of protofibrils than that of the 'D:D' interaction site.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = cancer
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10/579. Glutaraldehyde-fixed heterologous pericardium for vena cava grafting following hepatectomy.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Glutaraldehyde-fixed heterologous pericardium has been widely used for grafts in cardiac surgery. We applied it for inferior vena cava (IVC) patch grafting following combined resection of the liver and the IVC. METHODOLOGY: IVC grafting using a glutaraldehyde-fixed horse pericardium following combined resection of the liver and the IVC was performed in 2 patients--one with hepatocellular carcinoma and the other with hepatic metastasis following rectal cancer. The retrohepatic vena cava defect was closed with a 10 x 5 cm patch in one patient and a 7 x 4 cm patch in the other. RESULTS: Hepatic vascular exclusion was avoided in both patients. The IVC exclusion period was 40 min for the first patient and 25 min for the second. One patient required a veno-venous bypass with an active centrifugal pump of 153 min. There was no complication and no graft infection. The microscopic extension to the IVC was evident in one patient, and fibrous adhesive was evident in the IVC wall of the other. One patient died of hepatic failure 3 years and 6 months after surgery, and the other died of hepatic recurrence 7 months after surgery. Both grafts were patent, without calcification and stricture, until the patients' death. CONCLUSIONS: Glutaraldehyde-fixed heterologous pericardium is an option for IVC grafting.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = cancer
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