Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/294. Treatment of upper abdominal malignancies with organ cluster procedures.

    Upper abdominal exenteration for upper abdominal malignancies was carried out in 15 patients with removal of the liver, spleen, pancreas, duodendum, all or part of the stomach, proximal jejunum and ascending and transverse colon. Organ replacement was with the liver, pancreas and duodenum plus, in some cases, a short segment of jejunum. Eleven of the 15 patients survived for more than 4 months; 2 died, after 61/2 and 10 months, of recurrent tumor. Of the 9 patients who are surviving after 61/2 to 14 months, recurrent tumor is suspected in only 1 and proven in none. Four patients with sarcomas and carcinoid tumors (2 each) have had no recurrences. The other 5 survivors had duct cell cancers (3 examples), a cholangiocarcinoma (1 example), and a hepatoma (1 example). The experience so far supports further cautious trials with this drastic cancer operation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cluster
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2/294. Medicolegal issues: headache.

    This article addresses headache-related topics in which medicolegal issues have occurred or in which they are likely to occur. Where possible, an actual case has been presented. Most sections of this article are divided into three parts: principle of care, case history, and discussion and recommendations. When appropriate, American Academy of neurology guidelines have been noted.
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ranking = 4.4582775913385
keywords = headache
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3/294. Surgical treatment of recurrent trigeminal neuralgia.

    In this retrospective investigation 7 patients operated on for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia via a suboccipital enlarged burr hole trepanation were evaluated. The intraoperative findings indicate that neo-compressive effects due to foreign material used during prior surgery are more important than adhesions around the nerve. Furthermore, the results of recurrent operations are encouraging as 6 of the 7 patients were painfree without additional neurological deficits.
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ranking = 2.8706135539777
keywords = neuralgia
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4/294. ophthalmoplegic migraine and periodic migrainous neuralgia, migraine variants with ocular manifestations.

    The spectrum of migraine has been outlined with particular attention to two entities: ophthalmoplegic migraine and Periodic Migrainous Neuralgia. Although quite different in many respects from classical migraine, the relationship of a periodic localized vascular phenomenon giving rise to headache and transient neurologic signs, classify PMN and OPGM as migraine variants. Supportive of this concept, the literature has been reviewed in both entities, and some observations are made on the validity of earlier reports. It is the author's opinion that Raeder's syndrome should be reserved for patients with a lesion localizing in the paratrigeminal area. This does not exclude migraine as an etiologic agent but also recognizes tumors, infections and fractures as being more common.
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ranking = 12.707060304088
keywords = headache, migraine, neuralgia
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5/294. Rosai-Dorfman disease presenting as a pituitary tumour.

    A 45-year-old woman had pyrexia, headaches, collapse and hyponatraemia. Intracerebral abscess, bacterial meningitis and subarachnoid haemorrhage were excluded. She was given intravenous antibiotics and gradually recovered. One month later she was readmitted with diplopia, headache and vomiting. serum sodium was low (107 mmol/l) and a diagnosis of inappropriate ADH secretion was made. MRI scan showed a suprasellar tumour arising from the posterior pituitary gland. A skin rash gradually faded. serum cortisol, prolactin, gonadotrophins and thyroid hormone levels were low. A pituitary tumour was removed trans-sphenoidally, she had external pituitary radiotherapy, and replacement hydrocortisone and thyroxine. She was well for 12 months when she developed progressive weakness and numbness of both legs. Examination suggested spinal cord compression at the level of T2 where MRI scanning showed an intradural enhancing mass. This spinal tumour was removed and her neurological symptoms disappeared. Nine months after this she developed facial pain and nasal obstruction. CT scan showed tumour growth into the sphenoid sinus and nasal cavities. A right Cauldwell-Luc operation was done and residual tumour in the nasal passages was treated by fractionated external radiotherapy and prednisolone. Histological examination of the specimens from pituitary, spinal mass, and nasal sinuses showed Rosai-Dorfman disease, a rare entity characterized by histiocytic proliferation, emperipolesis (lymphophagocytosis) and lymphadenopathy. aged 48 she developed cranial diabetes insipidus. Although Rosai-Dorfman syndrome is rare, it is being reported with increasing frequency, and should be borne in mind as a possible cause of a pituitary tumour.
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ranking = 1.7833110365354
keywords = headache
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6/294. Reactivation of neurocysticercosis: case report.

    A 37-year-old woman with a known history of longstanding neurocysticercosis presented with a three-day history of new onset headache. Several years prior to her current presentation, she had undergone cysticidal treatment and was assumed to be cured of active disease. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies done three months prior to presentation showed multiple intracerebral calcified lesions consistent with resolved neurocysticercosis. Physical and laboratory findings were noncontributory. Imaging studies showed the same previously calcified lesions, but they were now surrounded by large amounts of edema. This case represents a unique report of reactivation of neurocysticercosis and raises interesting questions about the natural history of this infection.
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ranking = 0.89165551826769
keywords = headache
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7/294. Extradural balloon obliteration of the empty sella report of three cases (intrasellar balloon obliteration).

    empty sella syndrome is an anatomical and clinical entity composed of intrasellar reposition of the CSF and compression of the pituitary tissue, resulting in a clinical picture of headache, visual field defect, CSF rhinorrhea and some mild endocrinological disturbances. While some cases are primary with no appreciable aetiology, secondary cases are associated with prior operation or radiotherapy of the region. In our series, 3 patients with primary empty sella syndrome were treated by the current approach of extradural filling of the sellar cavity. This technique was first described by Guiot and widely accepted thereafter. We used a detachable silicon balloon filled with HEMA or liquid silicone for obliteration of the sellar cavity and obtained clinically satisfactory results without complications. Visual symptoms regressed and headache disappeared. But at long term follow-up all the balloons were found to be deflated. Despite the facility and efficacy of the technique we do not recommend it in the treatment of the empty sella because the filling of the sella is only transient and relapses may occur.
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ranking = 1.7833110365354
keywords = headache
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8/294. Early rebleeding from intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas: report of 20 cases and review of the literature.

    OBJECT: In this study the authors sought to estimate the frequency, seriousness, and delay of rebleeding in a homogeneous series of 20 patients whom they treated between May 1987 and May 1997 for arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) that were revealed by intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The natural history of intracranial dural AVFs remains obscure. In many studies attempts have been made to evaluate the risk of spontaneous hemorrhage, especially as a function of the pattern of venous drainage: a higher occurrence of bleeding was reported in AVFs with retrograde cortical venous drainage, with an overall estimated rate of 1.8% per year in the largest series in the literature. However, very few studies have been designed to establish the risk of rebleeding, an omission that the authors seek to remedy. methods: Presenting symptoms in the 20 patients (17 men and three women, mean age 54 years) were acute headache in 12 patients (60%), acute neurological deficit in eight (40%), loss of consciousness in five (25%), and generalized seizures in one (5%). Results of the clinical examination were normal in five patients and demonstrated a neurological deficit in 12 and coma in three. Computerized tomography scanning revealed intracranial bleeding in all cases (15 intraparenchymal hematomas, three subarachnoid hemorrhages, and two subdural hematomas). A diagnosis of AVF was made with the aid of angiographic studies in 19 patients, whereas it was a perioperative discovery in the remaining patient. There were 12 Type III and eight Type IV AVFs according to the revised classification of Djindjian and Merland, which meant that all AVFs in this study had retrograde cortical venous drainage. The mean duration between the first hemorrhage and treatment was 20 days. Seven patients (35%) presented with acute worsening during this delay due to radiologically proven early rebleeding. Treatment consisted of surgery alone in 10 patients, combined embolization and surgery in eight, embolization only in one, and stereotactic radiosurgery in one. Three patients died, one worsened, and in 16 (80%) neurological status improved, with 15 of 16 AVFs totally occluded on repeated angiographic studies (median follow up 10 months). CONCLUSIONS: The authors found that AVFs with retrograde cortical venous drainage present a high risk of early rebleeding (35% within 2 weeks after the first hemorrhage), with graver consequences than the first hemorrhage. They therefore advocate complete and early treatment in all cases of AVF with cortical venous drainage revealed by an ICH.
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ranking = 0.89165551826769
keywords = headache
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9/294. Severe steroid-dependent asthma with IgG-2 deficiency and recurrent sinusitis: response to treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    patients with severe asthma pose a dilemma to the physician since the treatment they need, namely high doses of oral steroids, has serious side effects, especially among the pediatric population. Deficiency in one or more of the IgG subclasses has been associated with abnormal pulmonary function, as well as with recurrent sinopulmonary infections in adults and children. In the last years attention has been focused on alternative therapies for these patients. One of these alternatives is the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). We report an 11-year-old boy with severe asthma since the age of two years and multiple hospital admissions due to asthmatic crisis even more frequent and severe, to the point of needing, in the last year, daily treatment with high doses of oral steroids (20 mg). During six months the patient was given high doses of intravenous immunoglobulin. After one month of treatment a clinical and spirometric improvement was apparent allowing to taper down the oral steroids until their complete substitution by inhaled budesonide (1,600 microg/day). The only side effects noted were severe headaches after gammaglobulin infusions which responded well to oral paracetamol. This improvement was sustained throughout the treatment period, but few weeks after the IVIG was suspended the clinical and spirometric parameters started to worsen again.
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ranking = 0.89165551826769
keywords = headache
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10/294. Resolution of MRI abnormalities of the oculomotor nerve in childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine.

    ophthalmoplegic migraine is an uncommon disorder, usually starting in older childhood. Its physiopathology remains obscure and diagnosis is reliant on clinical grounds and exclusion of other disorders. We report four cases of childhood ophthalmoplegic migraine, one of them starting in infancy. association with other types of migraine is common. Two of the three patients studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enhancement and enlargement of the cisternal portion of the oculomotor nerve, which spontaneously resolved after 2 and 4 years, respectively. Persistence of clinical recurrences was associated with long-lasting presence of the MRI finding, and possibly with mild sequelae. These radiological abnormalities suggest a common physiopathological mechanism with other inflammatory diseases, except for a benign evolution which, added to its specific anatomic site, seems to be the only neuroradiological marker, besides normality, in ophthalmoplegic migraine. The very long potential duration of MRI changes and the scarcity of clinical episodes make feasible its incident discovery once the migraine attack has become a remote memory.
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ranking = 7.1391854569783
keywords = migraine
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