Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/22. Photocoagulation of iris nevus to control recurrent hyphema.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of recurrent hyphema caused by an iris nevus that was successfully treated with photocoagulation. METHOD: Case report. In a 30-year-old woman with recurrent hyphema secondary to an iris nevus, photocoagulation was applied to the iris nevus. RESULTS: Before photocoagulation of the iris nevus, the patient had increasing frequency of hyphema episodes. After treatment, no hyphema episodes occurred during 13 months of observation. CONCLUSION: Photocoagulation of the surface of an iris nevus may prevent recurrent hyphema.
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2/22. Recurrent hyphema in an aphakic child: Swan syndrome.

    In 1973, Swan described 3 patients who developed hyphema months to years after uncomplicated cataract surgery. He noted focal vascularization from an ingrowth of episcleral vessels at the cataract wound site, resulting in recurrent intraocular bleeding. Swan syndrome has been reported following intracapsular cataract extraction, extracapsular cataract extraction (including clear corneal incisions), iridocyclectomy, and glaucoma filtering procedures. patients typically present with sudden painless blurred vision, often upon awakening, which may or may not be preceded by physical strain or trauma. Other patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed with hyphema or anterior chamber red blood cells on routine examination. The hyphema often resolve spontaneously, making later diagnosis difficult. Gonioscopic visualization of the abnormal wound vessels is necessary for diagnosis. Without active bleeding, however, the fibrovascular tuft may be easily overlooked. We report a case of Swan syndrome in a 16-month-old boy after cataract extraction was performed. To our knowledge, Swan syndrome has not been reported in the pediatric population. Children represent a significant proportion of patients undergoing anterior segment surgery and Swan syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyphema in this population.
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keywords = hyphema
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3/22. Recurrent microhyphema despite intracapsular fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens.

    A 61-year-old woman experienced multiple episodes of transient visual blurring in her pseudophakic eye, each of which lasted about 1 hour. Repeat examination during a symptomatic episode revealed anterior chamber red blood cells consistent with a microhyphema in the pseudophakic eye despite intracapsular fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL). Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed intracapsular fixation of the IOL haptics and revealed proximity of the edge of the IOL optic to the inferior pupillary margin in the region of an iridociliary body cyst. uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome may occur despite intracapsular fixation of a PC IOL.
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keywords = hyphema
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4/22. Spontaneous hyphema: an unusual complication of uveitis associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Two patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and recurrent uveitis had rubeosis iridis each with an episode of spontaneous hyphema. Rubeosis iridis has been reported to occur in some cases of uveitis, but it has not been seen in those associated with AS. We suggest that AS be included among the conditions that can lead to the development of rubeosis iridis, with consequent silent hyphema.
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5/22. Bimanual bipolar diathermy for recurrent hyphema after anterior segment intraocular surgery.

    phacoemulsification with mechanical pupil dilation was performed on a functionally monocular glaucoma patient with pseudoexfoliation syndrome. The postoperative course was complicated by persistent intraocular hemorrhaging from the pupil margin in multiple locations that ceased temporarily with a marked elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP). Normalization of IOP with medication or paracentesis resulted in recurrent bleeding and a subsequent increase in IOP elevation. Surgical intervention using bipolar diathermy was required to control the bleeding and the elevated IOP. A bimanual approach allowed the corrective procedure to be performed in a simple and efficacious manner.
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keywords = hyphema
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6/22. Delayed suprachoroidal hemorrhage and factor viii deficiency.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical course of a 52-year-old white man with previously undiagnosed hemophilia who suffered blunt trauma to the right eye with consequent delayed, spontaneous suprachoroidal hemorrhage. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: The patient's clinical course from the time of trauma to postenucleation is discussed and correlated with B-scan ultrasonography and histopathology. RESULTS: The patient developed recurrent hyphemas, delayed choroidal hemorrhage with detachment and eventually loss of the eye. Hematologic evaluation established a diagnosis of mild factor viii deficiency. CONCLUSION: Despite mild hemophilia, this patient had not experienced any clinically important morbidity until his eye injury. Ophthalmologists should be aware that bleeding disorders such as hemophilia predispose patients to spontaneous intraocular hemorrhage.
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keywords = hyphema
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7/22. Management of prominent iris vascular tufts causing recurrent spontaneous hyphema.

    PURPOSE: To report the management of recurrent, spontaneous hyphema associated with florid iris vascular tufts in a patient presenting for cataract surgery. methods: Interventional case report and review of the literature; presentation of clinical findings, iris angiography, and the argon laser regimen used to minimize potential corneal complications with increased total treatment energy. RESULTS: An 80-year-old man with a 20-year history of bilateral, recurrent, spontaneous hyphema associated with extensive iris vascular tufts presented with visually significant cataracts. Serial argon laser photocoagulation treatment of the prominent, circumferential iris vascular tufts of the left eye arrested further episodes of spontaneous hyphema and facilitated uneventful cataract surgery. argon laser parameters were titrated to therapeutic effect during the initial treatment sessions, and sectoral photocoagulation of the circumferential vascular tufts was performed during a 5-month period to accommodate increased laser power and energy. The total energy required to complete treatment of the extensive lesions was substantially more than that in similar previous reports; however, no adverse corneal complications were associated with the laser therapy. CONCLUSIONS: This case appears to represent the first description of chronic, bilateral, recurrent spontaneous hyphema associated with iris vascular tufts. argon laser treatment of symptomatic iris vascular tufts promotes resolution of recurrent, spontaneous hyphema and may serve to mitigate the risk of hemorrhage from these lesions during subsequent intraocular surgery. Conservative management of increased total treatment energy may minimize the potential risk of corneal decompensation with argon laser therapy.
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8/22. rotation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses for management of lens-associated recurring hyphemas.

    Management of recurring hyphemas associated with posterior chamber intraocular lenses may include a combination of medical, laser, and surgical modalities. Miotic and laser therapies have often failed, and surgical treatment has primarily relied on removal of the offending lens. We describe herein a method for rotation of the intraocular lens that provides an effective means of preventing one form of recurrent intraocular hemorrhage.
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keywords = hyphema
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9/22. Idiopathic bilateral spontaneous hyphemas.

    Spontaneous hyphemas are rare and usually associated with iris microhemangiomas or other vascular anomalies of the iris. In addition, various systemic problems can result in spontaneous hyphema. This is a case report of a bilateral spontaneous hyphema (recurrent in one eye), in which no predisposing condition could be identified after exhaustive hematologic evaluation and iris fluorescein angiography.
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keywords = hyphema
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10/22. argon laser therapy of occult recurrent hyphema from anterior segment wound neovascularization.

    Recurrent hyphema is a complication of anterior segment surgery that may present with a variety of signs and symptoms. The appropriate diagnosis of this syndrome may be overlooked because its presentation is frequently delayed, and its symptoms and signs are varied and frequently evanescent. Major forms of surgical intervention have been recommended for this syndrome, but we believe that many such cases can be treated relatively simply and effectively with argon laser goniophotocoagulation using topical anesthesia. We present five cases of recurrent hyphema from neovascularization of a surgical incision.
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