Cases reported "Recurrence"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/19. sarcoidosis-related anterior uveitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus.

    BACKGROUND: This is the first ophthalmic report--to our knowledge--of an anterior uveitis secondary to sarcoidosis in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv). Other reported causes of uveitis in hiv-infected patients have included hiv, herpes zoster, tuberculosis, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcus, rifabutin prophylaxis for mycobacterium, and protease inhibitors such as ritonavir and indinavir. uveitis secondary to sarcoidosis in the non-hiv population is classically seen in young, female, African-American patients. There are rare reports, found exclusively in the pulmonary literature, of sarcoidosis in hiv-infected patients. CASE REPORT: A 38-year-old African-American male infected with hiv was treated for chronic recurrent anterior uveitis secondary to sarcoidosis. His sarcoidosis was diagnosed 1 month earlier, along with the onset of his uveitis. During the previous 6 years he has been treated with anti-hiv antivirals as well as prophylaxis for opportunistic infections. To date, his infectious disease specialist continues to treat his hiv and systemic sarcoidosis. CONCLUSION: patients with hiv infection in whom sarcoidosis with secondary uveitis develops are very rare. Management of these patients requires careful use of topical and oral steroidal anti-inflammatories to control ocular and systemic sequelae of sarcoidosis. This case initiates some interesting questions about the immunology of sarcoidosis and its presence in immunocompromised patients. Use of steroids in an immunocompromised patient is clinically complex. Further clinical study is needed to elicit the full clinical significance of sarcoidosis and hiv infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/19. recurrence of Mycobacterium avium infection in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and antimycobacterial agents.

    The known effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on opportunistic infections (OIs) range from immune restoration disease to remission of specific OIs. In the present study, mycobacterium avium complex infection recurred in 3 patients receiving antimycobacterial therapy and HAART. At the time of the initial M. avium infection, the mean CD4 cell count was 22.3 cells/mm3, and the hiv viral load was 181,133 copies/mL. Relapse occurred a mean of 14. 3 months after the first episode; the mean follow-up CD4 cell count was 89/mm3 (mean elevation of 66 cells/mm3), and the hiv viral load was <400 copies/mL in each patient. M. avium was isolated from blood (1 patient), blood and lymph node (1), and small-bowel tissue (1). M. avium infection may recur as a generalized or focal disease in those who are receiving antimycobacterial agents but whose HAART-associated CD4 cell recovery, although significant, is not optimal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2705244694268
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/19. Mycobacterium intracellulare as a cause of a recurrent granulomatous tenosynovitis of the hand.

    We report a case of recurrent granulomatous tenosynovitis with M. intracellulare in a 55-year-old hiv negative diabetic woman. Identification of the causative agent further than belonging to the M. avium-intracellulare complex is provided by specific PCR-amplification of genomic dna and sequencing of an hypervariable region within its 16S rna gene. Sixteen months antibiotic regimen of rifabutin and clarithromycin led to a complete resolution of the tenosynovitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.15881555867835
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/19. A case of mycobacterium scrofulaceum osteomyelitis of the right wrist.

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the case report is to highlight the possibility of osteomyelitis caused by atypical mycobacteria. Such an infection may simulate tuberculous bone infection and yet fail to respond to standard anti-tuberculous drug therapy. CLINICAL PICTURE: A 66-year-old man who suffered from diabetes mellitus presented with osteomyelitis of the right wrist, with extensive synovial swellings of the flexor tendon sheaths. The clinical features, radiological appearances and histology suggested a tuberculous infection, but subsequent culture grew an atypical mycobacterium, mycobacterium scrofulaceum. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME: There was good clinical improvement and control of the infection with a regime of kanamycin, ethambutol and ethionamide to which the organism was sensitive. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the need to be aware of the possibility of infection with atypical mycobacteria in cases of suspected tuberculosis of the skeletal system which fail to respond to standard treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/19. Recurrent Mycobacterium avium osteomyelitis associated with a novel dominant interferon gamma receptor mutation.

    Mycobacterium avium causes infections in immunocompromised individuals. Recurrent infection with this organism has been associated with a deletion at the 818 residue of the interferon-gamma receptor (IFN-gammaR). This mutation produces a truncated receptor without an intracytoplasmic tail, resulting in diminished signaling. We describe a substitution at the 832 residue of the IFN-gammaR causing a similar truncated receptor in a 7-year-old girl with recurrent M avium osteomyelitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.95289335207012
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/19. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare endocarditis causing rupture: replacement and repair with aortic homograft.

    aortic valve endocarditis with extension to the tricuspid annulus and ventricular septum in an intravenous drug abuser - with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare identified as the offending organism - forms the basis of this report. The aortic root and ventricular septal defect were successfully repaired using an aortic cryopreserved homograft. This case is of particular interest because M avium-intracellulare has not been recognized as a cause of endocarditis. The incidence of atypical organisms as a cause of endocarditis may increase in the future because of the rise of drug abuse and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome in north america.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.95289335207012
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/19. Recurrent 'sterile' verrucous cyst abscesses and epidermodysplasia verruciformis-like eruption associated with idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia.

    rupture of follicular (epidermoid) cysts is believed to be the consequence of bacterial infection. We report a 24-year-old man with idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia and chronic Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infection who developed multiple, recurring painful abscesses over the distal extremities that increased in number and severity when systemic steroid and interferon-gamma treatment was instituted for interstitial lung disease. Cultures were consistently negative for microorganisms, but pathological examination revealed ruptured epidermoid cyst walls with human papillomavirus (HPV) viropathic changes (keratinocytes with perinuclear halos and abundant basophilic keratohyaline granules). Cutaneous examination showed numerous, widespread flat-topped papules and achromic macules over the extremities, head and neck. Nested polymerase chain reaction analysis for HPV dna revealed that the abscess-related cyst walls harboured epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV)-associated HPV types 20, 24, alb-7 (AY013872) and 80. His cutaneous lesions harboured HPV types 3, 8 and 80. Similar to past reports, our patient developed an EV-like eruption in the setting of immunodeficiency. In this instance, EV-associated HPV infection of the follicular infundibular epithelium or pre-existing cysts in the setting of immunodeficiency may have led to cystic growth, rupture and subsequent painful inflammation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.15881555867835
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/19. recurrence of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in an hiv-infected patient: apparent selective immune reconstitution after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Although several studies have reported that it is safe to discontinue secondary pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis in patients infected with hiv who experience a sustained immune response as a result of antiretroviral therapy, we describe a patient who developed recurrent PCP <3 months after discontinuing trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. He developed disease despite a sustained CD4 T-cell count above 200 cells/microL for more than 3 years while on antiretroviral therapy, as well as an apparent immune reconstitution against disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and histoplasma capsulatum, for which he also discontinued therapy but without adverse effects. Thus, although increasing evidence continues to indicate that hiv-infected patients receiving combinations of antiretroviral therapies may regain specific immunity against opportunistic infections, our patient's experience suggests that this immune recovery may be selective and incomplete.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.15881555867835
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/19. Impairment of IL-12-dependent STAT4 nuclear translocation in a patient with recurrent Mycobacterium avium infection.

    We examined the immunological abnormality in a patient with recurrent Mycobacterium avium infection. T cells from the patient showed decreased ability both to produce IFN-gamma and to proliferate in response to IL-12. Despite decreased expression of IL-12R beta1 and beta2 chains in the patient's PHA-activated T cells, there was no difference in IL-12-induced tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT4 in PHA-activated T cells between the patient and healthy subjects, suggesting that IL-12R signals are transmitted to STAT4 in the patient's PHA-activated T cells. Using EMSA, confocal laser microscopy, and Western blotting, we demonstrated that the nuclear translocation of STAT4 in response to IL-12 is reduced in PHA-activated T cells from the patient when compared with those from healthy subjects. Leptomycin B was used to examine whether nuclear export of STAT4 is increased in the patient's T cells. However, leptomycin B treatment did not reverse impaired IL-12-induced nuclear accumulation of STAT4. Although the exact mechanism responsible for the impaired STAT4 nuclear translocation in this patient remains unclear, the absence of mutation in the IL-12Rbeta1, IL-12Rbeta2, STAT4, and STAT4-binding sequence of the IFN-gamma gene and preservation of STAT4 tyrosine and serine phosphorylation suggest the existence of a defective STAT4 nuclear translocation. This defect is likely responsible for the impaired STAT4 nuclear translocation in IL-12-stimulated T cells, leading to impairment of both IFN-gamma production and cell proliferation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with atypical mycobacterial infection associated with impairment of STAT4 nuclear translocation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.79407779339177
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/19. mycobacterium marinum causing tenosynovitis. 'Fish tank finger'.

    mycobacterium marinum is an unusual atypical mycobacterium with low pathogenicity for humans in comparison with mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among the non-tuberculous mycobacterial pathogens, mycobacterium marinum is the most common pathogen to cause skin infections. mycobacterium marinum infection causes chronic cutaneous lesions and in some cases deeper infections such as tenosynovitis, septic arthritis and rarely osteomyelitis. We report the case of a male patient presenting with tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremity secondary to mycobacterium marinum infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Recurrence'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.