Cases reported "Recurrence"

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11/244. Recurrent traumatic dislocation of the hip joint at the age of 13 and 17 years. A case report.

    We report a case of a recurrent traumatic dislocation of the hip joint in a young man at the age of 13 and 17. The patient had retroversion of the femoral neck, instead of a physiological anteversion. We found no consensus about the management of a recurrent traumatic dislocation of the hip joint in the literature. The various therapeutic options are discussed. We advised posterior capsulorraphy with femoral rotation osteotomy. The patient refused surgery.
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12/244. Lingual tonsillectomy for refractory paroxysmal cough.

    Historically, the lingual tonsils are the most neglected members of Waldeyer's ring. They are often overlooked even in a thorough head and neck exam because of their anatomic location and the ambiguous constellation of symptoms which they produce when they are diseased or enlarged. The lingual tonsils have been reported to be associated with a variety of upper aerodigestive tract symptoms including odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, globus, halitosis, chronic cough, and dyspnea. Many patients with lingual tonsillar pathology may undergo extensive work-up for some of these non-specific upper airway complaints by their primary physician before referral to an otolaryngologist. Consequently, the diagnosis of lingual tonsillar disease requires a high index of suspicion and a thorough physical exam including evaluation of the tongue base and hypophaynx with indirect mirror or fiberoptic exam. In order to draw attention to this frequently unrecognized entity, we present a case report of a child with chronic cough resulting from lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.
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13/244. Clinical study on recurrent intracranial aneurysms.

    The authors report 11 cases who underwent reoperations upon for recurrent aneurysms. The initial operations were performed on average 10.1 years earlier for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patients' mean age at the first surgery was 39.7 years. The locations were 9 internal carotid (IC)-posterior communicating artery (PC) and 2 anterior communicating artery (A-com) aneurysms. A residual aneurysmal neck after the first operation was observed in 3 of 10 cases confirmed by postoperative angiography. The primitive-type PC artery was seen in 8 of 9 recurrent IC-PC aneurysms. The recurrent manifestations were SAH in 9 cases. Clipping operations were conducted in 10 and ligation of the IC artery together with extracranial-intracranial bypass in 1 large IC-PC aneurysm. The present study demonstrated two risk factors for aneurysm recurrence, namely, young age and IC-PC aneurysms with a primitive-type PC. Furthermore, direct operation for recurrent aneurysm is often embarrassing due to adhesions to the surrounding tissue as a sequela of the previous operation, hence understanding of the anatomical correlation between the old clip and the recurrent portion is important.
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14/244. Eosinophilic fasciitis preceding relapse of peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    Although eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) may precede hematologic malignancy or Hodgkin's disease, association with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is extremely rare. Only four cases of EF preceding or concomitant PTCL have been reported in the world literature. We experienced the first Korean case of EF complicated by the later relapse of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. A 63-year-old Korean male has been followed at our outpatient clinic periodically after treatment for stage IV PTCL. He had been in complete remission for seven and a half years when he developed edema of both lower extremities followed by sclerodermatous skin change in both hands with peripheral eosinophilia. biopsy from the left hand showed fibrous thickening of the fascia with lymphoplasmacytic and eosinophilic infiltrate, consistent with EF. Twenty-five months later, a newly developed lymph node from the left neck showed recurrence of PTCL. EF may occur as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with the relapse of PTCL. Therefore, in a patient with EF, the possibility of coexisting and/or future occurrence of hematologic neoplasm should be considered.
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15/244. radio-guided surgery in recurrent renal hyperparathyroidism: report of a case.

    BACKGROUND: It has been demonstrated that radio-guided surgery offers several advantages in treating primary hyperparathyroidism. Even if it is considered less helpful in renal hyperparathyroidism, it could be of tremendous advantage in the treatment of persistent or recurrent secondary hyperparathyroidism. methods: We report a case of recurrent secondary hyperparathyroidism treated by the use of radio-guided surgery. The preoperative assessment consisting of ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy identified a parathyroid in the upper mediastinum. The patient underwent a radio-guided neck re-exploration that allowed a rapid localization and excision of the ectopic gland, which was located in the anterosuperior mediastinum, in front of the trachea, between the innominant and the left common carotid artery. RESULTS: The operative time was 45 minutes. The patient was discharged on the first postoperative day. A decrease in serum calcium and parathyroid hormone was observed subsequently. A follow-up of 6 months did not show any recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: The case reported indicates that radio-guided surgery can help surgeons detect parathyroid tissue in selected cases of renal hyperparathyroidism.
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16/244. Unusual presentation of tuberculosis reactivation in childhood: an anterior neck mass.

    Although extrapulmonary tuberculosis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, involvement of the thyroid gland in children has been reported very rarely. The authors report a case of an 11-year-old girl with a nontender nodular swelling of the thyroid, whose symptoms, tomographic and scintigraphic features, mimicked a nodule with a cystic component. Although seldom observed, tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nodular lesions of the thyroid in children, especially in the patient with known history of exposure to tuberculosis.
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17/244. A case of minute intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas presenting with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Intraductal papillary mucinous tumor (IPMT) of the pancreas, a lesion consisting of mucin-producing cells with neoplastic potential, is characterized by duct ectasia, mucin hypersecretion, often extensive papillary intraductal growth, varying degrees of cytologic atypia, and relatively indolent growth. The clinical presentation of IPMT of the pancreas is characterized by chronic or recurrent attacks of abdominal discomfort often in association with low level pancreatic enzyme elevations. Less commonly these lesions may be detected as asymptomatic radiographic abnormalities. Interestingly, a case of a minute IPMT (2 mm in height and 7 mm in length, adenoma) in the main pancreatic duct presenting with acute pancreatitis in a 55 year-old man has been reported in the Japanese literature. Recently, we also experienced a case of a minute IPMT in a branch pancreatic duct causing repeated bouts of acute pancreatitis in a 75 year-old man. A filling defect at the neck of the main pancreatic duct seen on an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram performed after recovery of the second attack of acute pancreatitis led the patient to undergo an exploratory laparotomy. After a near-total pancreatectomy was carried out, a minute (3 x 7 mm) IPMT of borderline malignancy was discovered in a branch duct at the head portion near the pancreatic neck without any lesions in the main pancreatic duct. Surprisingly, despite the resective surgery the patient died of carcinomatosis 8.5 months after the operation. We herein report a case of a minute but aggressive IPMT of the pancreas with a review of the literature.
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18/244. Spontaneous disappearance and reappearance of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm: one case found in a group of 33 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage who underwent repeat angiography.

    The spontaneous disappearance and reappearance of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is generally assumed to be a rare phenomenon although the actual incidence is unknown. Among 39 consecutive cases of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), 33 were studied by three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (CTA) within 6 h after the onset of SAH, followed by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) within 24 h after the ictus. Of those patients, one, a 58-year-old woman, had a saccular aneurysm at the distal anterior cerebral artery; the aneurysm was clearly demonstrated by CTA 2.5 h after the SAH onset, but was not shown by a subsequent DSA performed 8.5 h after the ictus. A follow-up DSA detected the neck of aneurysm on day 11, and the whole aneurysm was visualized on day 19. The observations in this particular case suggest that the spontaneous disappearance of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may occur during the ultra-early stage of SAH and that reappearance may follow during the next few weeks. The patient did not suffer complications such as vasospasm or systemic hypotension nor was she treated with antifibrinolytic agents. The aneurysmal shape and the surrounding clot are considered as putative factors possibly related to the intermittent appearance of the aneurysm.
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19/244. Relapsing pancreatitis in a child duplication in an aberrant pancreatic lobe.

    An aberrant pancreatic lobe associated with an enteric duplication cyst is a rare cause of relapsing pancreatitis in childhood. We present an 8-year-old boy with relapsing pancreatitis caused by this rare congenital foregut anomaly. The computed tomography (CT) findings revealed an unusually long segment of aberrant pancreatic lobe arising from the pancreatic neck, projecting anteriorly at a distance to a cystic duodenal duplication and appearing as an inflammatory mass. There has been no previous report of this unusual appearance on CT. Appreciation of the relevant anatomy provided by CT led to the successful management of this surgically-treatable cause of relapsing pancreatitis.
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keywords = neck
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20/244. Mechanism and prevention of enlargement or new development of aneurysm following treatment by clipping or coiling.

    The mechanisms of cerebral aneurysm recurrence and enlargement were investigated in 11 patients: two with dissecting aneurysms, six with fully grown aneurysms after neck clipping, one with enlarged aneurysm after dome clipping, and two with enlarged aneurysm due to recanalization after GDC coil embolization. We concluded that it is fundamentally important to ensure complete attachment of the internal elastic lamina around the aneurysm neck by precise neck clipping and effective embolization, with accurate positioning of remaining internal elastic lamina.
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