Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/36. Histopathological findings in proliferative membrane from a patient with sarcoid uveitis.

    BACKGROUND: Sarcoid uveitis is occasionally accompanied by proliferative changes, such as retinal neovascularization and vitreous hemorrhage. Steroid administration, retinal photocoagulation, and vitrectomy may be indicated in such proliferative cases. CASE: A 19-year-old woman presented with proliferative sarcoid uveitis accompanied by recurrent vitreous hemorrhage. OBSERVATIONS: At the initial examination, bilateral vitreous opacity, retinal exudates, mild vitreous hemorrhage, retinal vasculitis, and neovascularization of the retina and optic disc were observed. Although prednisolone was administered and panretinal photocoagulation was performed several times, recurrent vitreous hemorrhage continued. Since the vitreous hemorrhage was not absorbed, pars plana vitrectomy and lensectomy were performed. After surgery, neovascularization and intraocular inflammation decreased, and the corrected visual acuity in the right eye improved to 20/50. Histopathologic analysis of the proliferative membrane removed during surgery revealed substantial neovascularization and numerous neutrophils in the vessels. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings, an inflammatory reaction as well as retinal ischemia were thought to be involved in the proliferative changes in this patient.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neovascularization
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2/36. The development of choroidal neovascularization in pregnancy.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the possible association between the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and pregnancy. methods: A retrospective review was performed of the clinical records of three patients who were pregnant at the time a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) was diagnosed. The clinical presentations and treatment of the CNVM occurring in association with the pregnancies are described. RESULTS: Each patient had a decrease in visual acuity during her pregnancy: one in the first trimester, one in the second trimester, and one in the third trimester. Two patients were diagnosed with CNV related to presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) and one with an idiopathic CNVM. The two-patients with POHS showed progression of CNV after childbirth. All patients received laser photocoagulation directly to the site of the CNV. The two patients with ocular histoplasmosis experienced recurrence after treatment; one received further photocoagulation treatment, and the other underwent vitrectomy with removal of the CNVM. CONCLUSIONS: pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period may be associated with development or recurrence of CNV in POHS or idiopathic cases. This may be related to hormonal changes during pregnancy, or the cases described may reflect only a coincidental association. This report discusses possible causal factors and mechanisms.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = neovascularization
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3/36. radiation-associated choroidal neovasculopathy, exudative detachment and neovascular glaucoma. A case report.

    radiotherapy remains a controversial type of therapy for subfoveal neovascularization. Recently a peculiar pattern of neovascular growth of the irradiated choroidal neovascular membrane has been described. This evolution may be associated with extensive exudative reaction. In one of our patients with this complication, the disease progressed to a total exudative retinal detachment and neovascular glaucoma.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = neovascularization
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4/36. Subretinal surgery for choroidal neovascularization in patients with high myopia.

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the visual outcome in patients undergoing surgical removal of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in eyes with high myopia. methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 48 consecutive patients with high myopia (> or =6 diopters [D]) who underwent vitrectomy with surgical removal of subfoveal CNV. The patient population consisted of 2 groups. Group 1 included 23 patients with findings only of myopic degeneration, and group 2 included 25 patients with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome and myopia of 6 D or more. RESULTS: In group 1, the visual acuity improved by 2 or more Snellen lines in 9 eyes (39%), decreased in 8 eyes (35%), and remained unchanged in 6 (26%), with a mean follow-up of 24 months (range, 8-60 months). The preoperative visual acuity was 20/40 or better in only 1 eye (4%), but 8 (35%) achieved a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better. In group 2, the visual acuity improved in 16 eyes (64%), was stable in 4 (16%), and deteriorated in 5 (20%), with a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-44 months). Only 3 eyes (12%) had a preoperative visual acuity of 20/40 or better, but 11 (44%) achieved a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better. recurrence occurred in 13 (57%) of the 23 eyes in group 1 and in 9 (36%) of the 25 eyes in group 2. Univariate analysis demonstrated a significant relation between younger patient age (group 1) and absence of postoperative CNV recurrence (group 2) and an improvement of visual acuity (P<.01). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical removal of CNV may provide visual benefit in selected cases of subfoveal CNV associated with high myopia. The determination of whether surgical intervention is appropriate in these cases requires a prospective, randomized, clinical trial.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = neovascularization
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5/36. Comparison of visual function after foveal translocation with 360 degrees retinotomy and with scleral shortening in a patient with bilateral myopic neovascular maculopathy.

    PURPOSE: To compare the visual outcome after foveal translocation by scleral shortening and that after 360 degrees retinotomy with extraocular muscle surgery in a patient with bilateral myopic neovascular maculopathy. methods: Case report. RESULTS: A 52-year-old woman with bilateral myopic neovascular maculopathy underwent foveal translocation with scleral shortening in the left eye, and visual acuity improved from 20/70 to 20/30. However, choroidal neovascularization recurred, and the final visual acuity was 20/40 after excision of the choroidal neovascularization. Foveal translocation with 360 degrees retinotomy was performed on the right eye, and visual acuity improved from 20/150 to 20/30. The critical print size was better, and the retinal sensitive area was larger in the right eye. CONCLUSION: The better reading ability shown by foveal translocation by a 360 degrees retinotomy compared with scleral shortening may stem from a larger retinal sensitive area obtained by this method.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = neovascularization
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6/36. Visual outcome after surgical removal of choroidal neovascularization in pediatric patients.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the visual outcome after surgical removal of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in pediatric patients. methods: A retrospective, noncomparative, consecutive case series of 17 eyes undergoing surgical removal of CNV of various causes in patients aged 18 years and younger. RESULTS: The cause of the CNV was presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome in 11 eyes, idiopathic in 3, and optic nerve coloboma, ocular toxoplasmosis, and trauma in 1 eye each. Two eyes had CNV within 100 microm of the center of the foveal avascular zone (juxtafoveal CNV) and 1 eye had peripapillary CNV, while 14 eyes had CNV beneath the geometric center of the foveal avascular zone (subfoveal CNV). In eyes with subfoveal CNV, median preoperative Snellen visual acuity was 20/200 (range, 20/80-3/200). With a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-45 months), median final visual acuity was 20/50 (range, 20/20-2/200); 10 (72%) had improvement of 2 or more Snellen lines after surgery, and 6 eyes (43%) had final visual acuity of 20/40 or better. In 3 eyes with juxtafoveal CNV or peripapillary CNV, all eyes had improvement of 4 or more Snellen lines. Postoperative recurrent CNV developed in 6 (35%) of 17 patients; 2 of the eyes underwent a second vitrectomy and 4 received laser treatment for the recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients may have good recovery of vision after surgical removal of CNV, and the removal of these membranes may be a viable alternative to laser photocoagulation in pediatric patients.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = neovascularization
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7/36. Clinicopathological correlation in exudative age-related macular degeneration: recurrent choroidal neovascularization.

    PURPOSE: To report the pathology of surgically removed submacular tissue in recurrent choroidal neovascularization after laser photocoagulation of classic choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. methods: A recurrent subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane was surgically removed in two patients. The recurrence was identified as a classic membrane on fluorescein angiography at the foveal border of the laser scar. A net was visualized in the early venous phase of the indocyanine green angiogram, with associated late hyperfluorescence. Both patients had undergone laser photocoagulation for a classic interpapillomacular choroidal neovascular membrane about 1 1/2 years earlier. The specimens were serially sectioned and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, Masson trichrome and phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin. RESULTS: The two specimens consisted of subretinal fibrovascular tissue with fibrin exudation. Fibrovascular tissue bordered subretinal fibrous tissue adherent to Bruch's membrane and remnants of the choroid in one patient. The fibrovascular portion most likely corresponded to the recurrence, whereas the fibrous portion represented the original membrane, being obliterated after photocoagulation. Some peripapillary tissue was additionally removed in the other patient. The latter lesion was invisible on fluorescein angiography but stained in the late phase of indocyanine green angiography and corresponded histopathologically to poorly vascularized intra-Bruch's fibrovascular tissue. Granular deposits, periodic acid-Schiff positive and metachromatically purple on Masson trichrome stain, representing diffuse drusen (basal laminar/linear deposits), were identified in the three specimens. CONCLUSION: A subretinal fibrovascular membrane corresponded with the classic recurrent choroidal neovascularization.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = neovascularization
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8/36. choroidal neovascularization in myopic eyes after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis.

    PURPOSE: To analyze the appearance and characteristics of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in patients with high myopia corrected by laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). patients AND methods: The authors studied CNV in 2955 consecutive eyes (1632 patients) that underwent LASIK for the correction of myopia (from -6 to -27.5 diopters). Follow-up was 34.2 /-11.3 months. RESULTS: choroidal neovascularization occurred in three eyes (0.10%) and in one eye previous CNV was reactivated (three women, one man). The time interval between refractive surgery and CNV was 13 /-9.5 months (range, 4-26 months). Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after LASIK and before CNV development was 20/57 (range, 20/100-20/29). After the appearance of CNV, mean BCVA was 20/606 (range, 20/2000-20/80). Differences between BCVA before and after CNV were statistically significant (P = 0.04, paired Student's t-test). The CNV was treated in two cases by argon laser photocoagulation and in two cases by surgical excision of CNV by vitrectomy. The final mean BCVA was 20/277 (range, 20/800-20/50). Differences between BCVA after LASIK and after CNV treatment were statistically significant (P = 0.04, paired Student's t-test). CONCLUSIONS: Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis as a correcting procedure for myopia was followed by low appearance of CNV. The appearance and treatment of CNV was followed by a significant decrease of BCVA.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = neovascularization
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9/36. Surgical removal of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization without removal of posterior hyaloid: a consecutive series in younger patients.

    PURPOSE: Subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) remains a common and important cause of visual loss. Previous studies have suggested that submacular surgery may improve or maintain visual acuity, particularly in younger patients. The majority of reported cases included removal of the posterior hyaloid during vitrectomy. The authors present a consecutive series of patients age 55 or younger with subfoveal CNV removal without posterior hyaloid removal. methods: Seventeen patients without age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), with subfoveal CNV from choroiditis, presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, myopia, or idiopathic causes, underwent a small retinotomy technique to extract the membranes after vitrectomy without posterior hyaloid removal. RESULTS: Median improvement in visual acuity was from 20/320 to 20/50. Eleven patients (65%) experienced an improvement of three or more lines of Snellen acuity (average 7.5), 4 (23%) were within two lines of preoperative acuity, and 2 (12%) had decreased acuity, with an average follow-up of 12 months (range 3-31). Choroidal neovascularization recurred in six patients (35%). Postoperative retinal detachment, epiretinal proliferation, or macular hole did not occur. CONCLUSIONS: In this series of younger patients with subfoveal CNV not from ARMD, visual acuity was improved in the majority after submacular membrane removal. Omission of removal of the posterior hyaloid did not adversely affect outcome.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = neovascularization
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10/36. Peripapillary subretinal neovascularization in sarcoidosis: remission and exacerbation during oral corticosteroid therapy.

    BACKGROUND: In sarcoidosis, peripapillary subretinal neovascularization is rare. The role of corticosteroid therapy for subretinal neovascularization is controversial. CASE: A 38-year-old female patient weighing 38 kg with histologically diagnosed sarcoidosis presented with peripapillary subretinal neovascularization, retinal phlebitis, a hyperemic disc, and snowball vitreous opacities in the left eye. observation: Oral betamethasone therapy at an initial dose of 3 mg/day reduced the size of subretinal neovascular membrane, and the membrane became fibrous. Despite the total initial 140 mg of betamethasone given over 2.5 months and the additional total 700 mg of prednisolone given over the next 2 months, the subretinal neovascularization recurred. Six months after the first recurrence, a second recurrence developed during the tapering-off period of oral corticosteroid therapy. At the second recurrence, the oral corticosteroid therapy was ineffective in reducing the size of the neovascular membrane. CONCLUSION: In our patient, oral corticosteroids temporarily suppressed peripapillary subretinal neovascularization but failed to prevent extension of neovascular membrane to the fovea because of recurrent sarcoidosis. Over time, oral corticosteroids appear to lose their effectiveness for treating repeated recurrence of peripapillary subretinal neovascularization associated with sarcoidosis.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = neovascularization
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