Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/498. Watermelon stomach--an unusual cause of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a uremic patient receiving estrogen-progesterone therapy: case report.

    A 50-year-old woman who had been on maintenance hemodialysis for 5 years developed severe anemia resistant to treatment with iron supplements and erythropoietin 4 months prior to hospital admission. Her stool occult blood test was positive, and an initial panendoscopy revealed evidence of possible antral gastritis. However, repeated administration of sucralfate, H2 blockers and a proton pump inhibitor was not effective in preventing further gastrointestinal tract blood loss and subsequent refractory anemia. She required multiple blood transfusions and hospital admissions during this period. There was no obvious coagulopathy or thrombocytopenia. After her third admission, a second panendoscopy demonstrated the typical picture of watermelon stomach. A trial of hormone therapy with estrogen and progesterone increased the hemoglobin level within a month without further evidence of active gastrointestinal bleeding. From our experience with this case, we found that the diagnosis of antral vascular ectasia (watermelon stomach) with bleeding requires a high degree of clinical alertness and careful endoscopic examination. Estrogen and progesterone therapy may provide a good option for treating the disease in uremic patients without an obvious complication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the use of maintenance hormone therapy in a female uremic patient to successfully treat watermelon gastric bleeding.
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2/498. Sudden recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis due to apoplexy of parathyroid adenoma.

    Neoplastic lesions of the parathyroid are rare, and most of these are adenomas. Even rarer is a secondary involvement of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. A case is presented of sudden onset hoarseness in a 64-year-old man caused by acute vocal cord paralysis due to bleeding within an adenoma of the lower right parathyroid gland. Acute onset of vocal cord paralysis is rarely associated with benign processes; the current case is only the second report associated with parathyroid adenoma.
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3/498. ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads induced with class IC antiarrhythmic drugs: insight into the mechanism of brugada syndrome.

    We evaluated two patients without previous episodes of syncope who showed characteristic ECG changes similar to brugada syndrome following administration of Class IC drugs, flecainide and pilsicainide, but not following Class IA drugs. Patient 1 had frequent episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation resistant to Class IA drugs. After treatment with flecainide, the ECG showed a marked ST elevation in leads V2 and V3, and the coved-type configuration of ST segment in lead V2. A signal-averaged ECG showed late potentials that became more prominent after flecainide. Pilsicainide, a Class IC drug, induced the same ST segment elevation as flecainide, but procainamide did not. Patient 2 also had frequent episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Pilsicainide changed atrial fibrillation to atrial flutter with 2:1 ventricular response, and the ECG showed right bundle branch block and a marked coved-type ST elevation in leads V1 and V2. After termination of atrial flutter, ST segment elevation in leads V1 and V2 continued. In this patient, procainamide and quinidine did not induce this type of ECG change. In conclusion, strong Na channel blocking drugs induce ST segment elevation similar to brugada syndrome even in patients without any history of syncope or ventricular fibrillation.
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4/498. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in childhood: report of 10 cases.

    We report 10 children with the diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. diagnosis was based on clinical and radiologic findings, and after acute encephalitis was excluded by negative culture and antibody results. The most common presenting symptom was ataxia, followed by optic neuropathy, cranial nerve palsy, convulsions, motor dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showing bilateral symmetrical hyper-intense lesions of the same age in brain stem, subcortical white matter, thalamus, basal ganglia, or cerebellum was the mainstay of the diagnosis. The presence of a preceding event (either an infection or vaccination) was present in 8 of 10 patients. Brain computed tomographic scans were abnormal in 3 of 10, and electroencephalogram was normal in all patients. High-dose corticosteroids were given to six patients, one received low-dose steroids, and the other three had symptomatic follow-up. Those who relapsed were mainly from the symptomatic follow-up group. Only one patient (the youngest) receiving high-dose methylprednisolone relapsed. Therefore, early high-dose steroid treatment seems to be the most effective treatment in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and can prevent relapses.
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ranking = 1.561911358433
keywords = nerve
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5/498. Computerized tomography of the glottis after intracordal autologous fat injection.

    According to the committee on speech, voice, and swallowing disorders of the American Academy of otolaryngology-head and neck Surgery, various surgical methods such as laryngeal framework surgery, laryngeal re-innervation, and injection laryngoplasty might be used to palliate inferior laryngeal nerve paralysis. In the present case report we document the survival and exact location of the boluses of autologous fat in one patient in whom this material was used for injection laryngoplasty.
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keywords = nerve
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6/498. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial flutter after orthotopic heart transplantation: insights into the redefined critical isthmus.

    We report a case of successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of recurrent atrial flutter in a heart transplant recipient and discuss technical aspects of the procedure. A counterclockwise flutter circuit was defined during endocardial mapping of the donor atrium. Termination of atrial flutter was achieved by creating lines of radiofrequency lesions from the tricuspid ring to the suture line between donor and recipient atria. Creation of bidirectional conduction block in the tricuspid ring-suture line isthmus resulted in abolition of atrial flutter.
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7/498. Surgical treatment of recurrent trigeminal neuralgia.

    In this retrospective investigation 7 patients operated on for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia via a suboccipital enlarged burr hole trepanation were evaluated. The intraoperative findings indicate that neo-compressive effects due to foreign material used during prior surgery are more important than adhesions around the nerve. Furthermore, the results of recurrent operations are encouraging as 6 of the 7 patients were painfree without additional neurological deficits.
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keywords = nerve
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8/498. Application of skull base techniques to pediatric neurosurgery.

    Techniques for skull base surgery have become well established over the last 10 years. Most of these techniques are used in adult patients for skull base tumors and neurovascular diseases. There are very few large series of pediatric patients in whom skull base approaches have been used, because of the rarity of these conditions. The authors would like to present a relatively large series of 26 pediatric patients who underwent skull base approaches for tumor resection. These tumors involved the anterior cranial base in 5 patients, the medial cranial skull base in 4 patients, and the posterior cranial base in 12 cases. Five patients had tumors that involved two or more fossae. The overall complication rate was 57%, which included temporary cranial nerve palsies, CSF leak and infection. patients with permanent complications were 8 in number (37%). There was 1 postoperative death from pneumonia approximately 6 weeks after surgery. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 24 of the 26 patients. skull base tumors in children are often extensive and present significant surgical challenges. Although complete tumor extirpation is the goal in most pediatric patients, this is often achieved only with some morbidity. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of skull base approaches for these tumors and underscores the high stakes involved.
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keywords = nerve
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9/498. Recurrent convulsions and cardiac conduction disturbances after propafenone overdose.

    propafenone is a class Ic antiarrhythmic agent which also exhibits beta-adrenergic and fast sodium channel blockade. We report a case of severe poisoning in a 24-y-old woman who suffered a seizure 1 h after the intentional ingestion of 2.7 g propafenone, and had a recurrence of convulsion on arrival at the hospital. She also developed severe arrhythmia during her hospital course. She recovered uneventfully with supportive treatment.
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10/498. A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst: delineation of surgical margins and reconstruction with bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps.

    A case of central carcinoma of the mandible arising from a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is reported. A 38-year-old man was admitted to the Tokai University Hospital due to postoperative infection of a recurrent odontogenic keratocyst of the left mandible. He had had a cystectomy for an odontogenic keratocyst 4 years ago. The lesion revealed bony destruction of the mandible with worm-eating shaped margins with extension to the facial skin. A biopsy specimen revealed squamous cell carcinoma. The mandible was resected with facial skin and the sublingual space was dissected to preserve the lingual nerve. The oral and the facial resections were reconstructed with a titanium plate and bilateral rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flaps. The plate was removed due to infection around the margins and readjustment of the flaps was conducted 5 months after the surgery. He has not had a local relapse, metastasis, or incisional hernia for 8 months following surgery. Good occlusion has been attained by the residual mandible, and he is able to eat without any problems.
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ranking = 1.561911358433
keywords = nerve
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