Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/6. Recurrent meningitis associated with complete Currarino triad in an adult--case report.

    A 58-year-old woman presented with Currarino triad manifesting as recurrent meningitis. Currarino triad is a combination of a presacral mass, a congenital sacral bony abnormality, and an anorectal malformation, which is caused by dorsal-ventral patterning defects during embryonic development. She had a history of treatment for anal stenosis in her childhood. Radiographic examinations demonstrated the characteristic findings of Currarino triad and a complicated mass lesion. The diagnosis was recurrent meningitis related to the anterior sacral meningocele. neck ligation of the meningocele was performed via a posterior transsacral approach after treatment with antibiotics. At surgery, an epidermoid cyst was observed inside the meningocele. The cyst content was aspirated. She suffered no further episodes of meningitis. The meningitis was probably part of the clinical course of Currarino triad. radiography of the sacrum and magnetic resonance imaging are recommended for patients with meningitis of unknown origin. The early diagnosis and treatment of this condition are important.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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2/6. Fractures of the sacrum and disk herniation: rare lesions in the pediatric surgical patient?

    Fractures of the sacrum and lesions of the intervertebral disks are seldom reported in childhood and adolescence. In our report, illustrated by three representative cases that we treated during the past six months, we show that sacrum fractures, not an easy diagnosis, may be more frequent than currently assumed, and that in quite a number of children and adolescents an anterior pelvic fracture may in fact be an unrecognized Malgaigne type pelvic fracture with a posterior fracture plane cutting through the sacrum. They may be accompanied by herniations and/or lacerations of intervertebral disks.
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ranking = 7
keywords = sacrum
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3/6. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: two cases of sacral disease responsive to corticosteroids.

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare inflammatory form of osteomyelitis of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents, and signs and symptoms include recurrent episodes of bone pain, tenderness, possible constitutional upset, and increased inflammatory markers. We present 2 patients with cases of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis affecting the sacrum who responded dramatically to treatment with corticosteroids.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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4/6. Bilateral fracture-dislocation of the sacrum.

    The authors describe a semiconservative approach for bilateral fracture-dislocation of the sacrum, an extremely rare injury. traction is advocated; it seems to lead to a good functional result after 20 years. Other authors either propose internal fixation or benign neglect, also with a good outcome. Every case must be approached on an individual base.
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ranking = 5
keywords = sacrum
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5/6. clostridium bifermentans bacteremia with metastatic osteomyelitis.

    osteomyelitis caused solely by an anaerobic organism is uncommon. We report a case of recurrent clostridium bifermentans bacteremia resulting in metastatic osteomyelitis involving the sacrum, spine, and ribs. The emergence of resistance of this organism to imipenem and metronidazole is noteworthy because of the usual susceptibility of clostridial species to these antibiotics.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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6/6. Case study: the role of surgical debridement and dural patching in the prevention of a recurrent radiation-induced sacral ulcer.

    The effects of radiation are not tissue selective. Changes are consistent with thermal injury, but evolve in a more insidious manner. erythema, edema, itching, and osteonecrosis can occur. These changes, over the sacrum, can lead to a spinal cutaneous fistula with persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in association with ulceration. Soft tissue coverage alone appears to be inadequate treatment. Aggressive bony debridement with dural patching have prevented recurrence of the fistula in a recent case.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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