Cases reported "Recurrence"

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1/8. Computerized tomography of the glottis after intracordal autologous fat injection.

    According to the committee on speech, voice, and swallowing disorders of the American Academy of otolaryngology-head and neck Surgery, various surgical methods such as laryngeal framework surgery, laryngeal re-innervation, and injection laryngoplasty might be used to palliate inferior laryngeal nerve paralysis. In the present case report we document the survival and exact location of the boluses of autologous fat in one patient in whom this material was used for injection laryngoplasty.
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ranking = 1
keywords = voice
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2/8. Hypnotherapeutic intervention for voice disorders related to recurring juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis.

    Recurring juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis is resistant to cure, and thus usually requires multiple operations which may lead to the extensive proliferation of vocal fold scar tissue. Severe hoarseness, sharply lower pitch, and weak loudness levels are common sequelae. Adjunctive hypnotherapy can increase motivation for change, speed up the acquisition of vocal skills, and possibly even facilitate or sustain remission of growths in selected patients. An 8-year-old girl with severe active eruptions went into remission after 16 sessions, and a 12-year-old boy, already in remission at the beginning of the intervention period, remained free of neoplasms throughout the regimen. Whether or not hypnosis contributed significantly to the sanguine results, it is probable that, at the least, the hypnotic intervention facilitated the achievement of certain technical objectives in voice therapy.
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ranking = 5
keywords = voice
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3/8. Ligneous conjunctivitis: an ophthalmic disease with potentially fatal tracheobronchial obstruction. Laryngeal and tracheobronchial features.

    Ligneous conjunctivitis is a rare disease of unknown cause characterized by pseudomembranous, fibrous, woody, plaquelike deposits on the conjunctiva. The disease appears to be hereditary and/or familial. Deposits similar to those found in the eye occur in the larynx, tracheobronchial tree, nose and nasopharynx, and vagina. When these lesions occur in the larynx and tracheobronchial tree, voice change and potentially life-threatening obstruction and pulmonary disease may occur. This paper reports the findings in a child with ligneous conjunctivitis who was followed for 1 1/2 years and who had laryngeal and tracheobronchial involvement with voice change and airway obstruction. The literature is reviewed and the histopathologic findings and endoscopic findings and management of the patient are documented. Because the patient had multiple papillomata of both hands, a possible association with human papillomavirus was suspected but never confirmed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = voice
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4/8. Recurring epiglottitis in an adult.

    We report a case of recurring epiglottitis in an adult. The patient presented with complaints of a sore throat and fever. The presence of a muffled voice led to radiologic and indirect laryngoscopic examination confirming the diagnosis. The patient responded promptly to glucocorticoids and parenteral antibiotics. Over the ensuing six months, he was readmitted to the hospital on three separate occasions with recurrent symptoms and findings of epiglottitis. On each occasion, he responded promptly to therapy. An exhaustive investigation failed to reveal a cause for this unique occurrence of recurring disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = voice
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5/8. Respiratory distress after recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning for adductor spastic dysphonia.

    Adductor spastic dysphonia is a voice sign associated with various neurologic and psychologic disorders. Treatment of spastic dysphonia in selected patients is unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning. Except for voice change or, in some patients, return of phonatory spasticity, there have been no long-term sequelae or complications of this treatment. We describe three patients with adductor spastic dysphonia who underwent recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning and who, 3 to 38 months later, suffered respiratory distress that required tracheostomy. The respiratory distress in all three patients was due to episodic jerky vocal cord hyperadductions that caused stridor during inspiration and expiration. These repetitive laryngospasms during respiration and phonation were progressive. Two patients needed an arytenoidectomy to achieve a useful voice, and all three required a permanent tracheostomy to alleviate inspiratory laryngeal obstruction.
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ranking = 3
keywords = voice
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6/8. Recurrent maternal virilization during pregnancy associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Maternal virilization in pregnancy is associated, in most benign cases, with luteoma of pregnancy and hyperreactio luteinalis. Only a few reports relate this phenomenon to hyperthecosis or polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). A case of recurrent maternal virilization during two consecutive pregnancies in a patient with PCOS is presented. In both pregnancies, the deepening of her voice, facial hirsutism and scalp hair loss began at the end of the first trimester and regressed 3-4 months post-partum. The patient underwent ovarian venous catheterization, and androgen secretion from both ovaries was found to be markedly high but similar, therefore ruling out an ovarian androgen-secreting tumour. Reviewing the English literature of similar cases, we found reports of only seven cases of maternal virilization during pregnancy associated with PCOS. Here, we present a case of recurrent maternal virilization in pregnancy associated with PCOS.
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keywords = voice
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7/8. Laryngeal tuberculosis: an unsuspected danger.

    It is always important to treat conditions which may be cancerous with respect and, where there is suspicion, to take biopsies for histological examination. A hoarse voice may, in addition, be a sign of tuberculosis of the larynx, and the clinical appearance can be similar to a carcinoma. Preoperative chest x-ray (not always performed) and an awareness by the histologist of such a possibility are important now that this condition is increasing in frequency in parallel with conditions where immunological status is compromised.
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keywords = voice
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8/8. Excision and low-dose radiotherapy for refractory laryngeal granuloma.

    Laryngeal granulomas are uncommon lesions of an inflammatory origin. They are conventionally managed by simple excision with the occasional use of adjuvant treatment depending on the aetiological factors. Unfortunately, recurrences can occur, requiring repeated excision. Some lesions are refractory to this approach and alternative management approaches include excision and immediate adjuvant radiotherapy. The use of radiotherapy in the management of benign disease can be limited by the risk of induction of late malignancy and informed consent of a patient must include an assessment of this risk. We describe a case of refractory laryngeal granuloma successfully treated by excision and immediate radiotherapy in a patient occupationally dependent upon his voice.
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ranking = 1
keywords = voice
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