Cases reported "Reflex, Babinski"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. Constant involvement of the Betz cells and pyramidal tract in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia: a clinicopathological study of eight autopsy cases.

    We investigated clinicopathologically pyramidal signs, including hyperreflexia, Babinski sign, and spasticity, and the involvement of the primary motor cortex and pyramidal tract, in eight Japanese autopsy cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with dementia. Pyramidal signs were observed in seven (88%) of the eight autopsy cases. Hyperreflexia and Babinski sign were evident in seven (88%) and three (38%) patients, respectively, but spasticity was not observed in any of the eight patients. Loss of Betz cells in the primary motor cortex was evident in the seven cases in which this structure was examined. Astrocytosis in the fifth layer of the primary motor cortex was noticed in three cases. In all eight cases, involvement of the pyramidal tract was obvious in the medulla oblongata, but no involvement of the pyramidal tract was found in the midbrain. Involvement of the pyramidal tract in the spinal cord, particularly of large myelinated fibers, was observed in all six cases in which the spinal cord was examined. In ALS with dementia, pyramidal signs were shown to be present more frequently than previously believed, and the clinicopathological correlation between pyramidal signs and involvement of the pyramidal tract was obvious. Constant involvement of Betz cells and the pyramidal tract in ALS with dementia has not been reported. Our clinicopathological findings may make a contribution to the understanding of the clinicopathological hallmarks of this disorder. Furthermore, we believe that this study will also contribute to the elucidation of the nosological status of ALS with dementia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sclerosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. Persistent neurological deficit precipitated by hot bath test in multiple sclerosis.

    For a half century, the hot bath test has been used as a "diagnostic test" in multiple sclerosis. The appearance of new neurological signs or aggravation of preexisting signs generally is transient, with resolution on return of body temperature to normal. We have observed four patients, however, with considerable and prolonged neurological debilitation after hot bath testing. We suggest caution in the application of such testing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13.092343833376
keywords = multiple sclerosis, sclerosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. Higher cerebral dysfunction in a case with atypical multiple sclerosis with concentric lesions.

    A patient with atypical multiple sclerosis (MS) with clear concentric structure was studied using high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This case was considered to be Balo's concentric sclerosis. magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse multiple concentric demyelinating lesions in the bilateral centrum semiovales, which finally regressed with the necrotic lesions remaining when the patient was discharged. During his clinical course, he showed some higher cerebral dysfunctions, such as memory disturbance, constructual apraxia and acalculia. He was treated with glycerin, prednisone and rehabilitation; all of which were effective in his recovery. Over a 4 month period, the patient recovered clinically, but some intellectual impairment remained.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13.292343833376
keywords = multiple sclerosis, sclerosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Reflex, Babinski'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.