Cases reported "Refractive Errors"

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1/3. Bilateral microcornea and unilateral macrophthalmia resulting in incorrect intraocular lens selection.

    A 79-year-old man with symmetrical microcornea and a dense unilateral nuclear sclerotic cataract had cataract extraction by phacoemulsification. The SRK/T formula suggested a 10.0 diopter (D) intraocular lens (IOL) for emmetropia (axial length 26.58 mm). The non-cataract eye required a 25.0 D IOL for emmetropia (axial length 21.51 mm). Biometric measurements were rechecked, and an 18.0 D IOL was implanted (axial length 24.02 mm). The 6 week postoperative refraction of -13.0 2.0 x 25 necessitated IOL exchange (10.0 D). Six weeks postexchange, the refraction was -3.75 2.5 x 30. This illustrates that symmetrical anterior microphthalmos does not always coexist with symmetrical posterior microphthalmos. awareness of the association of symmetrical microcornea and unilateral colobomatous macrophthalmia may aid appropriate IOL selection in future cases.
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2/3. Pseudophakic ametropia managed with a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens.

    We report the use of a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) to correct pseudophakic ametropia. Two eyes of 2 patients developed ametropia after unilateral phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. The manifest refraction was -6.00 -0.50 x 50 in the first patient and 4.50 -1.00 x 15 in the second. Both patients were bothered by the induced anisometropia and had posterior chamber phakic IOL implantation in the pseudophakic eye. Postoperatively, uncorrected visual acuity improved from 20/400 to 20/30 in the first patient and from 20/200 to 20/40 in the second patient. The manifest refraction was -0.50 -0.75 x 55 and 1.50 -1.50 x 30, respectively. No complications were noted. Implantation of a phakic posterior chamber IOL may be an alternative to currently available methods of managing pseudophakic ametropia.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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3/3. Management of corneal ectasia and cataract following photorefractive keratectomy.

    A 42-year-old man was referred to our clinic 18 months after bilateral photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). He had been on topical prednisolone acetate for 12 months because of post-PRK grade 4 haze. On his first visit, visual acuity was limited to light perception in both eyes because of moderate haze, significant corneal ectasia, and a white cataract. A 2-step surgical approach was elected in both eyes. First, a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty was performed. Six weeks later, phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation was performed. Compared with a triple procedure combining penetrating keratoplasty and cataract surgery in 1 stage, the 2-step approach may lower the risk for corneal graft rejection and reduce ametropia.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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