Cases reported "Relapsing Fever"

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1/26. Tick-borne relapsing fever imported from West africa: diagnosis by quantitative buffy coat analysis and in vitro culture of Borrelia crocidurae.

    West African tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is difficult to diagnose due to the low number of spirochetes in the bloodstream of patients. Previously, the causative microorganism, Borrelia crocidurae, had never been cultured in vitro. TBRF was rapidly diagnosed for two patients returning from western africa with fever of unknown origin by quantitative buffy coat (QBC) analysis. diagnosis was confirmed by intraperitoneal inoculation of blood specimens from patients into laboratory mice. in vitro experiments showed that QBC analysis may be as much as 100-fold more sensitive than thick smear. Spirochetes were also cultured from blood samples from both patients in modified Kelly's medium and were identified as B. crocidurae by partial sequencing of the PCR-amplified rrs gene.
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keywords = tick-borne, fever
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2/26. Short report: diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever by the quantitative buffy coat fluorescence method.

    The quantitative buffy coat (QBC) parasite detection method is a sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of malaria parasites. It is also useful for the diagnoses of other hemoparasites, including trypanosoma, babesia, and leptospira. We report a case of relapsing fever diagnosed by this technique in a short-term traveler from senegal. The diagnosis was confirmed by the standard Giemsa hemoscopy and by the identification of significant titers of antibodies to Borrelia spp. of tick-borne relapsing fevers by specific immunofluorescence and Western blot tests. The QBC technique seems to be useful in the diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever in blood samples and should be included in the management of fever in the traveler returning from tropical regions.
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ranking = 5.0483822589874
keywords = tick-borne, fever
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3/26. Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction associated with ciprofloxacin administration for tick-borne relapsing fever.

    A 14-year-old girl was seen at a community clinic with a chief complaint of abdominal pain and fevers and was treated with oral ciprofloxacin for presumed pyelonephritis. She became tachycardic and hypotensive after her first dose of antibiotic, and she developed disseminated intravascular coagulation. She was admitted to our hospital for presumed sepsis. Her outpatient peripheral blood smear was reviewed, revealing spirochetes consistent with Borrelia sp. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction to ciprofloxacin.
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ranking = 3.3542593900272
keywords = tick-borne, fever
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4/26. Tick-borne relapsing fever caused by Borrelia turicatae.

    Tick-borne relapsing fever manifests as relapsing episodes of fever with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of Borrelia turicatae disease in a 13-year-old male youth with outdoor exposures in texas. After multiple clinic visits the diagnosis was made, and treatment was initiated. The patient did well without long term sequelae.
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ranking = 0.20391808735983
keywords = fever
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5/26. relapsing fever and its serological discrimination from Lyme borreliosis.

    patients with Borrelia-caused relapsing fever produce cross-reacting antibodies to borrelia burgdorferi, the anti-genetically related causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. The antibody response of the serum of a patient (acute and convalescent) with relapsing fever was analysed by the immunoblot technique using Borrelia hermsii and B. burgdorferi as antigens. The diagnosis was established by microscopic detection of spirochetes in the patient's blood. The patient's serum showed significantly elevated titers of IgG and IgM in a B. burgdorferi indirect immunofluorescence assay. Immunoblot analysis indicated the presence of cross-reacting antibodies directed to B. burgdorferi antigens with apparent molecular weights of 60, 41, 40, 36, 30 and 20 kDa.
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ranking = 0.20391808735983
keywords = fever
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6/26. Tick-borne relapsing fever.

    Tick-borne relapsing fever is characterized by recurring fevers separated by afebrile periods and is accompanied by nonspecific constitutional symptoms. It occurs after a patient has been bitten by a tick infected with a Borrelia spirochete. The diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever requires an accurate characterization of the fever and a thorough medical, social, and travel history of the patient. Findings on physical examination are variable; abdominal pain, vomiting, and altered sensorium are the most common symptoms. Laboratory confirmation of tick-borne relapsing fever is made by detection of spirochetes in thin or thick blood smears obtained during a febrile episode. Treatment with a tetracycline or macrolide antibiotic is effective, and antibiotic resistance is rare. patients treated for tick-borne relapsing fever should be monitored closely for Jarisch-Herxheimer reactions. Fatalities from tick-borne relapsing fever are rare in treated patients, as are subsequent Jarisch-Herxheimer reactions. persons in endemic regions should avoid rodent- and tick-infested areas and use insect repellents and protective clothing to prevent tick bites.
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ranking = 3.558177477387
keywords = tick-borne, fever
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7/26. Tick-borne relapsing fever during pregnancy: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is uncommon. Vertical transmission in the gravid woman may result in spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery or perinatal mortality. We report a case in a pregnant woman who experienced a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (J-HR). CASE: A 24-year-old woman at 23 weeks' gestation had a relapsing fever of unknown origin and nonspecific complaints. Her peripheral blood smear demonstrated spirochetes consistent with TBRF caused by Borrelia. Treatment with antibiotics precipitated J-HR. Supportive measures and appropriate antibiotic therapy resulted in a clinical cure and normal term delivery. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of TBRF should be considered in individuals with recurrent fevers, especially those who have been in mountainous regions where Borrelia hermsii exists. Individuals receiving antimicrobials should be closely monitored for a J-HR.
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ranking = 0.23790443525314
keywords = fever
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8/26. relapsing fever associated with ARDS in a parturient woman. A case report and review of the literature.

    We report a patient who survived acute respiratory failure associated with tick-borne relapsing fever in the third trimester of pregnancy. The fetus was delivered by cesarian section and did not have spirochetemia. The severity of the patient's illness may be related to the immunosuppressive effects of pregnancy.
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ranking = 0.96601365210669
keywords = tick-borne, fever
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9/26. Borrelia hermsii causing relapsing fever and uveitis.

    PURPOSE: To describe a case of uveitis that is associated with Borrelia hermsii relapsing fever. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 12-year-old boy with two weeks of relapsing fevers 10 days after camping in remote eastern oregon was examined. Borrelia hermsii immunoglobulin m and G levels were markedly elevated. Intravenous ceftriaxone, followed by four weeks of oral cephuroxime was administered, but the patient developed unilateral floaters and blurred vision in association with anterior and intermediate uveitis. RESULTS: doxycycline was administered for presumed residual infection. Four weeks later, the visual acuity had improved. The anterior chamber was quiet, and topical corticosteroid was tapered successfully. CONCLUSION: Although rare, Borrelia hermsii should be included in the list of spirochetal diseases that are associated with uveitis.
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ranking = 0.067972695786611
keywords = fever
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10/26. Neonatal borrelia infections (relapsing fever): report of 5 cases and review of the literature.

    Tick borne relapsing fever is an endemic disease in Sengerema district, Mwanza region, tanzania, East africa. Five cases of neonatal relapsing fever occurring in this endemic area are described. Two neonates showed signs of septicaemia, clumping of spirochetes (Borrelia index is uncountable) in the thick blood smear and they died the day of admission. Two neonates showed severe spirochetaemia (Borrelia index: 3). The neonate treated with low dose penicillin died, the other neonate, treated with erythromycin, survived. One neonate had only a mild spirochetaemia (Borrelia index is 0.5) and responded well to penicillin treatment. jaundice was seen in four of the five cases, three of them died. Only twenty cases of neonatal relapsing fever were previously reported. Findings are discussed in comparison with those of former reports on relapsing fever in the literature. Based on the fact that in a relatively short time (1 year), 5 cases of neonatal relapsing fever were diagnosed in an endemic area in East africa, we conclude that neonatal relapsing fever is probably underdiagnosed.
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ranking = 0.33986347893306
keywords = fever
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