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1/10. Parthenium dermatitis: is it a systemic contact dermatitis or an airborne contact dermatitis?

    We describe here a Parthenium hysterophorus patch-test-positive patient with widespread dermatitis of non-airborne contact dermatitis pattern, improving while staying in Shimla (a parthenium-free area) and rapidly worsening while visiting his native place, where there was exuberant parthenium growth. After recovery, inhalation of fresh plant material from a polythene bag resulted in exacerbation of dermatitis and pruritus within 8-10 hr, without any respiratory symptoms. The possible pathomechanism of such a phenomenon is discussed.
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keywords = plant
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2/10. Sensitization to king scallop (Pectin maximus) and queen scallop (Chlamys opercularis) proteins.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of occupational asthma and urticaria due to the queen scallop (Chlamys opercularis) and king scallop (Pectin maximus). BACKGROUND: A 40-year-old female worked in a shellfish-processing plant, handling king and queen scallops for 5 years. At the time of investigation, she described a 2-year history of work-related respiratory symptoms. methods: Serial peak expiratory flow rate readings were recorded and an OASYS study completed. A workplace visit was undertaken and specific immunoglobulin (IgE) radioallergosorbent (RAST) testing of scallop extracts was performed. RESULTS: The OASYS study was consistent with occupational asthma. RAST testing demonstrated evidence of specific sensitization (IgE) to queen and king scallop. There was also some cross-reactivity observed with other shellfish (prawns and crabs). CONCLUSION: Workers exposed to aerosols from scallop species are at risk of occupational asthma and require effective respiratory health surveillance.
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keywords = plant
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3/10. Poppy seed allergy: a case report and review of the literature.

    seeds of the poppy plant are traditionally used in bakeries, e.g., for garnishing bread or making cakes. Reports of allergic type I sensitivity to poppy seed are rare. According to the literature, severe reactions may occur, affecting mainly patients with allergy to pollens or nuts. We report on a 16-year-old boy who has developed erythema and angioedema, conjunctivitis, and dyspnea due to inhalation of poppy seed. Skin-prick tests were positive for poppy seed, hazelnut, and chickpea. The concentration of specific IgE for poppy seed, hazelnut, and peanut were 3.36 kU/L (class 2), 1.5 kU/L (class 2), and 6.17 kU/L (class 3), respectively. Allergic reactions associated with inhalation of food allergens have been reported for some foods but not for poppy seed. This is the first report on inhalative allergy to the poppy seed. Although poppy seeds are not commonly used, we underline the possible importance of such rare and often hidden sources of allergens, especially in patients with nut allergy.
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keywords = plant
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4/10. association of fever, nasal congestion and rise in serum creatinine with azathioprine therapy.

    The association of fever, nasal congestion and reversible rise in serum creatinine in a patient receiving azathioprine is reported. An identical pattern of symptoms was induced after two rechallenges with azathioprine. The increases in serum creatinine were not associated with renal parenchymal abnormalities. This paper illustrates that in transplanted patients, fever and rises in serum creatinine are not only related to rejection or infection, but may also involve drug hypersensitivity.
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keywords = plant
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5/10. Epidemiologic and immunologic studies in processors of the king crab.

    Following the report of ten cases of respiratory illness in processors of frozen king crab, we investigated the conditions of work and the pulmonary and immunologic status of the workers in three crab-processing and one fish-packing (control) plant. Pulmonary function was measured before and after work, and skin tests were performed in subgroups matched for age, sex, and duration of current employment. The antibody response to king crab antigens was examined in sera from the subgroups and another (unrelated) control group. Extracts of crab meat, shell, and processing dust were used for skin testing and precipitin detection. FEV1, FVC, and MEFR decreased during the day in two crab processors, and precipitins were evident in sera from nine, but findings were normal in the fish packers. Crab meat elicited the strongest response, with multiple precipitin bands in some cases. Control sera showed no reaction. There was correlation between serology, results of skin tests, and symptoms. It is concluded that the inhalation of aerosolized crab antigen(s) may cause respiratory symptoms and can cause immunologic effects similar to those caused by other occupational respiratory allergens. We recommend preplacement and periodic medical examination of workers in crab-processing plants, improved ventilation in processing areas, and programs to discourage smoking.
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ranking = 2
keywords = plant
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6/10. IgE-mediated occupational allergy to a spider mite.

    Two patients who suffered from allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis and contact urticaria caused by the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae, Koch) are described. Both patients worked in a greenhouse where they came in contact with both spider mites and predator mites living on bean leaves. Prick, Prausnitz-Kustner and RAST tests indicated type I allergy to spider mite but not to predator mite. Both patients had a high level (RAST score 4) of spider-mite-specific IgE in their sera. radioallergosorbent test (RAST) inhibition studies revealed no cross-reactivity between spider mite and house dust mite allergens. These results show that spider mites, which are herbivorous mites found in nature, in greenhouses and even in homes, can cause IgE-mediated allergy in man.
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ranking = 7.3034919439411
keywords = bean
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7/10. serum IgE antibodies to psyllium in individuals allergic to psyllium and English plantain.

    psyllium is used in the production of bulk laxatives. By means of the RAST assay the authors demonstrated that psyllium can induce the formation of IgE antibodies. They also demonstrated that IgE antibodies in individuals allergic to English plantain may cross react to psyllium.
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ranking = 5
keywords = plant
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8/10. Allergic bronchopulmonary disease caused by Curvularia lunata and Drechslera hawaiiensis.

    Three patients who developed bronchoceles caused by fungi other than aspergillus sp are described. The first patient presented for investigation of a lesion at the right hilum on chest radiograph and a raised blood eosinophil count. A bronchogram showed complete block of the apical segmental bronchus which at operation was shown to be caused by inspissated material. The second patient was investigated because of a cough productive of plugs of sputum and irregular opacities in both upper zones on chest radiograph and a raised blood eosinophil count. This only cleared after one month on high dose oral prednisone therapy. The third patient with a previous history of left lingular pneumonia and bronchiectasis of the lingular segment of the left upper lobe was investigated three years later for right basal shadowing and a raised blood eosinophil count. The radiograph cleared after one month on high dose oral prednisone treatment. The aetiological agents in these cases were dematiaceous hyphomycetes, fungi ubiquitous in nature, and also agents of plant disease. The causal fungi, Curvularia lunata and Drechslera hawaiiensis, have on a few occasions been reported as causing human disease but in cases quite dissimilar to the three reported here. Septate branching dematiaceous mycelium was consistently seen in the clinical material and isolated from successive sputum specimens from each patient. immunodiffusion tests from the third patient gave positive results for both fungi. Intraperitoneal inoculations of C lunata and D. hawaiiensis into Swiss white mice proved the pathogenicity of these isolates.
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keywords = plant
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9/10. Occupational allergy caused by spathe flower (Spathiphyllum wallisii).

    Occupational allergy caused by plants is seldom reported although it is probably relatively common. We report on a 22-year-old male atopic caretaker of plants who developed IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis, laryngitis, pharyngitis, and contact and generalized urticaria caused by exposure to spathe flower (Spathiphyllum wallisii) while he was working for a firm that supplied plants to offices. He also had an asthmatic attack at work, but in bronchial provocation tests conducted 8 months after he had stopped doing the work in question, he developed rhinoconjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and laryngitis, but exhibited neither bronchial reaction nor fall in PEF values. Prick tests with spathe flower gave 3 reactions for exudates from the flower, pollen, stem, and leaves. He also had several positive reactions to fruits, vegetables, and spices, but not to natural rubber latex. The radioallergosorbent test with spathe flower was positive (3.4 PRU/ml, close to class 3). In protein staining with SDS-PAGE, one heavy band was detected at about 14 kDa, and other faint bands were visible on both sides. Six faint bands were detected at the mol. mass range of 30-67 kDa. In IgE immunoblotting, one heavy band was detected at about 14 kDa. The patient became symptomless after he had ceased working with plants.
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ranking = 4
keywords = plant
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10/10. Green bean hypersensitivity: an occupational allergy in a homemaker.

    As a member of the legume family, the green bean is frequently associated with food allergy. However, allergic reactions caused by skin contact or by inhalation of vapors from boiling legumes are rare. This article presents a case of occupational asthma in a homemaker; symptoms occurred during preparation and cooking of raw green beans. Skin prick, rub, and bronchial provocation tests were performed on the patient. in vitro tests were done with the serum samples of the patient and 10 control subjects (5 atopic and 5 nonatopic). Test results indicate that the patient has type I hypersensitivity to raw green bean antigen(s). This case is of interest because it demonstrates that a food allergen, when inhaled, can induce respiratory symptoms in sensitized patients and may even be the source of primary sensitization.
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ranking = 51.124443607588
keywords = bean
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