Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/34. asthma due to kerosene exposure: three case reports.

    Three families comprising 6 adults and 3 children experienced prolonged exposure to kerosene vapour as a result of accidental domestic oil storage tank spills in 3 separate incidents. All were previously well but within 6 to 8 weeks, 3 children and one adult developed asthma which has persisted for more than 2 years. The 5 remaining adults developed upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms (but not asthma) and symptoms of conjunctival irritation. Levels of kerosene vapour were measured in all rooms in one household and were within accepted toxicological limits. kerosene vapour is not considered toxic. asthma caused by kerosene vapour is previously undescribed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/34. Allergy to iguana.

    BACKGROUND: Furry animals produce allergens that can cause allergic rhinitis and asthma. In contrast, scaly animals, such as lizards, are assumed not to be allergenic. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate a 32-year-old man who complained of allergic rhinitis and asthma symptoms that occurred exclusively in his own home. He had dogs and cats at home but denied any increase in symptoms specifically associated with these pets. Skin prick testing initially performed to 42 common aeroallergens, including cat, dog, and house dust mite, elicited negative results. He later reported that the symptoms were worse on exposure to his pet iguanas. methods: Skin prick tests were subsequently performed to an extract made from scales from his pet iguana. Extracts were also prepared from several zoo reptiles. Immunoassays for IgE antibody, as well as IgE immunoblots, were performed by using these extracts and the patient's serum. RESULTS: The skin prick test result with the pet iguana scale extract was positive. The patient's serum contained IgE antibody to his own pet iguana and to a zoo iguana. CONCLUSION: Our patient's history, skin test results, and in vitro studies clearly demonstrate that he is allergic to iguana. physicians should be aware that such allergy to scaly pets may occur and should not restrict history taking to questions about furry pets.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/34. anaphylaxis to deer dander in a child: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: hypersensitivity to deer dander is rarely reported, with only 26 cases in the literature. Ours is the youngest reported case and the first reported case of anaphylaxis on exposure to a live deer. OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of a case of anaphylaxis in a young boy upon exposure to a deer. methods AND RESULTS: A 4-year-old boy experienced hives, swelling, and shortness of breath requiring epinephrine following a deer exposure. He had one mild reaction 5 days prior to his anaphylaxis with an indirect exposure. A deer dander extract was made from fur supplied by the patient's mother. IgE-mediated reactivity was positive for deer and cattle by both selective skin prick method and RAST results. CONCLUSION: hypersensitivity to wild animals can lead to life threatening anaphylaxis, even in children. Passive transfer of antigen may occur, but needs further investigation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/34. Pulmonary hypersensitivity associated with pancreatin powder exposure.

    A 25-year-old woman with obstructive, reversible pulmonary and nasal hypersensitivity apparently induced by casual, repeated inhalation of pancreatin powder (desiccated pork pancreas) is described. The powder was being employed as a dietary supplement for the patient's son, diagnosed as having cystic fibrosis. Two challenges of the diagnosed as having cystic fibrosis. Two challenges of the patient by reproducing home use of the powder resulted in repetition of a hypersensitivity symptom complex on both occasions. Vitalometry demonstrated an immediate and late response. Avoidance of pancreatin powder exposure resulted in subsidence of symptoms. Immunologic mechanisms are suggested but not proven.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/34. A baker's occupational allergy to flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella).

    BACKGROUND: Allergy to insects is common. However, few reports cover occupational sensitization to flour moth (Ephestia [syn. Anagasta] kuehniella). We describe a baker who suffered from IgE-mediated occupational respiratory allergy to flour moth. methods: The skin prick test (SPT) and serum IgE tests were used to evaluate the patient's sensitivity to flour moth. Allergen cross-reactivity with mites was evaluated in IgE-inhibition studies. Clinical sensitivity was evaluated by nasal challenge test. Pulmonary function tests were repeatedly monitored. RESULTS: SPT with flour moth gave a 6-mm wheal, and an elevated level of flour moth-specific IgE was measured in the patient's serum (1.9 PRU/ml, RAST class 2). immunoblotting with the patient's serum revealed at least seven heavy IgE-binding bands with molecular masses of 22, 35, 43, 53, 65, 77, and >86 kDa in the extract of flour moth. Allergen cross-reactivity with mites was demonstrated in inhibition studies. Immediate-type allergy to flour moth was confirmed by nasal challenge. Increased daily variability of PEF values was observed during workplace exposure. CONCLUSION: A baker's occupational respiratory allergy to flour moth was confirmed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/34. wood dust hypersensitivity.

    Two patients developed severe respiratory difficulty after occupational exposure to sawdust derived from abiruana wood. Both patients had positive immediate wheal-and-flare responses to skin tests with an extract of abiruana wood. skin tests to other wood dusts were negative. Precipitating antibodies could not be demonstrated in the patients' serum. Bronchial challenge in both patients produced acute airway obstruction that was rapidly reversible. In addition, 1 patient developed airway obstruction 6-8 hr later that was more gradually reversible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 16.200275428768
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/34. Specific sensitization to the common housefly (Musca domestica) not related to insect panallergy.

    BACKGROUND: Allergy to houseflies is rare. We report a case of respiratory allergy from occupational exposure to houseflies in a farmer. CASE REPORT: A 30 year-old female farmer with a long-standing history of grass pollen allergy observed for 2 years rhino-conjunctivitis and mild asthma when entering livestock stables and barns. Allergy retesting revealed sensitization to various pollens but not to animal danders. houseflies (Musca domestica) occurring on the farm in great quantity were suspected by the farmer herself as the causative agent. RESULTS: Skin prick testing with housefly was positive in the patient and negative in four controls. Experimental radioallergosorbant test was class 3 positive. Sensitization to house dust mite, storage mites and cockroach was not detectable. Western blots with housefly extracts revealed immunoglobulin e (IgE)-binding to bands of 70, 50, and approximately 16 kDa. tropomyosin in the housefly extract (35 kDa) was recognized by a tropomyosin reference serum but not by the patient. In enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) inhibition assays using housefly as the solid phase, IgE-binding of the patient was inhibited by 75% by M. domestica and by 44% by the closely related lesser housefly (Fannia canicularis), but not by extracts from blowfly (Lucilia spp.), fruit fly (drosophila spp.), horsefly (Haematopota pluvialis) and mosquito (culex pipiens). The IgE-binding of the tropomyosin control serum was inhibited by 60-80% by all species. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with previous reports, this case demonstrates that respiratory sensitization to insects may be highly specific. According to ELISA inhibition, cross-sensitization in the present case was restricted to species of the family of true flies (muscidae).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 16.200275428768
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/34. Occupational asthma (OA) with sensitization to diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) presenting at the onset like a reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS).

    BACKGROUND: Two types of OA are distinguished: immunological (OA with sensitization) and non-immunological, i.e., irritant induced asthma or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). methods: We describe the case of a worker who developed respiratory symptoms after a spill of diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) at the workplace. RADS was initially diagnosed and the worker resumed working. The progressive worsening of symptoms and the appearance of symptoms-work relationship one year later, when concentrations of isocyanates were no longer "irritant," suggested immunological OA. RESULTS: The diagnosis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge test, followed by removal from exposure and complete recovery. CONCLUSIONS: In the case of RADS due to an agent with both irritant and sensitizing properties, history should be repeatedly assessed for a possible symptom-work relationship. If this is found, further investigations should be carried out, including specific inhalation challenges, to confirm the possibility of immunological OA.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/34. Occupational asthma caused by exposure to cooking lobster in the work environment: a case report.

    A 25-year-old male chef developed symptoms of cough, wheezing, and dyspnea following repeated exposure to cooking lobster in his work environment. Skin prick tests to lobster, mixed shellfish, haddock, cod, oysters, and clams were strongly positive. Skin prick tests to other routine antigens were negative except for alternaria fungal spores. Bronchial inhalation of aqueous lobster extract resulted in an isolated early asthmatic response.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/34. Sensitization and chronic beryllium disease among workers in copper-beryllium distribution centers.

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the risk of sensitization and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) among workers performing limited processing of copper-beryllium alloys downstream of the primary beryllium industry. In this study, we performed a cross-sectional survey of employees at three copper-beryllium alloy distribution centers. methods: One hundred workers were invited to be tested for beryllium sensitization using the beryllium blood lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT); a sensitized worker was further evaluated for CBD. Available beryllium mass concentration air sampling data were obtained for characterization of airborne exposure. RESULTS: One participant, who had exposure to other forms of beryllium, was found to be sensitized and to have CBD, resulting in a prevalence of sensitization/CBD of 1% for all tested. CONCLUSIONS: The overall prevalence of beryllium sensitization and CBD for workers in these three copper-beryllium alloy distribution centers is lower than for workers in primary beryllium production facilities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = exposure
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Respiratory Hypersensitivity'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.