Cases reported "Retinal Diseases"

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1/279. Extensive brain calcification in two children with bilateral Coats' disease.

    We report two children with bilateral Coats' disease associated with cerebral calcifications in the basal ganglia and deep white matter, asymptomatic at the time of their discovery. cerebellar ataxia developed secondarily in one of them. Both children were born small for date and had febrile convulsive seizures. Three similar patients have been previously reported, two of them in the same sibship; the third reported patient died of aplastic anemia. Bilateral Coats' disease in children should prompt systematic CT scan in search of cerebral calcifications. If present, neurological and genetic prognosis should be cautious.
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ranking = 1
keywords = white
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2/279. Retinal findings in Takayasu's arteritis.

    PURPOSE: To describe unusual as well as typical ocular findings in eight patients with Takayasu's disease. methods: The ophthalmic manifestations and clinical courses of eight patients with Takayasu's disease were evaluated. RESULTS: All patients had clinical and angiographic evidence of pulseless disease. Typical findings included retinal venous congestion, fluorescein staining, capillary drop-out, microaneurysms and arteriovenous shunting. Unusual findings included cotton wool spots, anterior ischemic neuropathy and retinal emboli. In one case microaneurysms disappeared after carotid bypass surgery. Several patients had profound, transient, visual loss with changes in head posture. CONCLUSION: Takayasu's disease can cause a variety of retinal manifestations. Less common findings include cotton wool spots, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and retinal emboli.
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ranking = 88.685885592896
keywords = spot
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3/279. association of antiphospholipid antibodies with retinal vascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence and characteristics of retinal vascular disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to analyze their relationship with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and other serological markers. patients AND methods: Eighty-two consecutive patients (77 women and 5 men; mean age, 36 years) were studied. All patients fulfilled the 1982 revised criteria of the American College of rheumatology for the classification of SLE. Ophthalmologic examination included assessment of best corrected visual acuity, tonometry, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and fundus examination. Serologic studies included determination of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) (ELISA), lupus anticoagulant (LA) (coagulation tests), antinuclear antibodies (indirect immunofluorescence), anti-dna (Farr's test), and anti-ENA antibodies (counterimmunoelectrophoresis). RESULTS: Retinal vascular disease was detected in 13 (15%) of 82 SLE patients. The retinal lesions consisted of retinal vascular occlusions in six patients (five arterial and one venous), cotton-wool spots in three, optic disc edema in three, retinal hemorrhages in three, and ischemic optic neuropathy in one. Antiphospholipid antibodies were detected in 10 (77%) of these 13 patients: nine had aCL and two had the LA. When compared with patients without retinal vascular disease, patients with retinopathy had a higher prevalence of aPL (77% v. 29%, P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: Retinal vascular disease is frequent in patients with SLE. The presence of aPL is associated with a higher prevalence of retinal abnormalities in SLE patients.
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ranking = 44.342942796448
keywords = spot
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4/279. Multiple evanescent white dot syndrome in older patients.

    PURPOSE: To report two patients in their seventh decade who exhibited findings consistent with multiple evanescent white dot syndrome. methods: case reports of two patients referred for evaluation of decreased vision, visual field loss, and retinal white spots. RESULTS: A 60-year-old man and a 67-year-old woman had photopsia, visual field loss, and decreased central visual acuity. Examination disclosed numerous white retinal spots, ranging from 50 to 400 microm, with eventual foveal granularity. Visual field testing showed an enlarged blind spot and peripheral field defects. fluorescein angiography, electroretinography, and electrooculography results were consistent with multiple evanescent white dot syndrome. Eventually, the retinal lesions resolved in both patients and baseline visual acuity was recovered. CONCLUSION: A diagnosis of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome should be considered in patients with retinal findings typical of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome, regardless of age.
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ranking = 8815.1508989417
keywords = white spot, spot, white
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5/279. Dark spots in late-phase indocyanine green angiographic studies in a patient with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome.

    PURPOSE: We analyzed indocyanine green (ICG) angiograms in a patient with presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) complaining about "seeing spots" and decreased visual acuity in order to identify the pathologic process. patients AND methods: A 30-year-old caucasian man with clinical signs of POHS who had previously undergone laser photocoagulation for secondary choroidal neovascularization developed visual disturbances primarily in his temporal visual field. We performed fundus photography, fluorescein angiography and ICG angiography before, during and after the episode of visual disturbance. ICG angiographic findings were correlated to fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms. RESULTS: Fundus examination, fluorescein angiograms and early-phase ICG angiograms were unremarkable at all time points. However, during the phase of visual disturbance, late-phase ICG angiographic study revealed hypofluorescent lesions in the area representing the visual disturbances. At 1 week follow-up, these hypofluorescent lesions were reduced in size and number; at 6 months follow-up they had completely resolved. CONCLUSIONS: Late-phase ICG angiographic study can provide additional information in inflammatory retinal disease by virtue of identifying areas of choroidal alterations while standard diagnostic examination remain unremarkable.
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ranking = 221.71471398224
keywords = spot
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6/279. Ocular toxocariasis: a rare presentation of a posterior pole granuloma with an associated choroidal neovascular membrane.

    BACKGROUND: Ocular toxocariasis is a rare infection caused by the nematode larvae of toxocara canis, which is commonly found in dogs. Human transmission is usually via geophagia, the ingestion of food contaminated with the toxocara eggs, or contact with infected puppies, often resulting in devastating ocular and/or systemic effects. Distribution is worldwide; however, a higher incidence is demonstrated in the united states. methods: A 17-year-old black woman sought treatment at a neighborhood health center with a report of gradual decrease in vision from her left eye over a 3-month period. Her ocular and systemic histories were unremarkable. Anterior segment evaluation revealed no signs of anterior uveitis. The posterior pole showed a 1.5 DD, round, raised, white, subretinal lesion adjacent to the fovea with an overlying serous retinal detachment and retinal hemorrhage. RESULTS: She was referred to a retinologist who performed both fluorescein and indocyanine green (ICG) angiographies. A serum toxocara ELISA test was also ordered. fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescence consistent with the granuloma. The ICG demonstrated an occult choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) underlying the area of hemorrhage inferotemporal to the granuloma. CONCLUSION: This paper illustrates the case presentation and includes an extensive review of the ocular and systemic manifestations of toxocariases. A description of ICG videoangiography, therapeutic approaches, and management will also be discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = white
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7/279. Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy associated with Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PURPOSE: To report acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) in the course of systemic Wegener's granulomatosis. methods: A complete ophthalmologic evaluation was undertaken, including fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. RESULTS: Two patients diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis developed multiple white-yellow subretinal areas with smooth margins typical of APMPPE. Case 1 presented with bilateral choroidal involvement and a granulomatous anterior uveitis. In Case 2, placoid lesions were diagnosed 2 months after onset of systemic Wegener's granulomatosis. In both cases, fluorescein angiography showed an early hypofluorescence and a late staining of the lesions. Indocyanine green angiography revealed early and late hypofluorescence corresponding to the areas seen clinically. Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed histologically in both cases. After combined steroid and cyclophosphamide therapy, the lesions healed, and after a follow-up period of 1.5 and 4 years, respectively, funduscopic and angiographic examinations showed cicatricial lesions. CONCLUSION: Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy is a rare manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis and should be considered a possible systemic involvement of the disease. A prompt, thorough investigation should be undertaken for an underlying systemic disorder.
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keywords = white
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8/279. Elastic cord-induced cyclodialysis cleft and hypotony maculopathy.

    We describe a case of hypotony maculopathy in which hypotony was due to a cyclodialysis cleft produced by an elastic cord injury. Sixteen months after being hit with an elastic cord, a 43-year-old white male presented with progressive loss of vision in the right eye. The visual acuity in the right eye was 1/200 due, in part, to a subluxated and cataractous lens. The intraocular pressure (IOP) was 4 mm Hg. gonioscopy revealed a cyclodialysis cleft at the 2 o'clock position, and fundus examination showed hypotony maculopathy. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy, pars plana lensectomy, repair of the cyclodialysis cleft, placement of an anterior chamber intraocular lens, and tightly sutured trabeculectomy without antimetabolite. Sixteen months following surgery, visual acuity was stable at 20/60 and IOP was 11 mm Hg but the chorioretinal folds persisted.
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ranking = 1
keywords = white
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9/279. Progressive confluent circumpapillary multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To describe a morphologic variant of the multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome that can mimic other conditions. methods: We examined three patients with severe cases of unilateral multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome characterized by an atypical progressive circumpapillary discoloration of the fundus. RESULTS: The confluent circumpapillary lesion progressed toward or beyond the equator of the fundus, raising initial concern of a viral retinitis. However, pinpoint dots at the leading edge evolved into the typical wreath-like spots of multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome, which then coalesced into the advancing edge of a geographic retinitis or retinal pigment epitheliitis, before spontaneous resolution. CONCLUSION: Progressive geographic circumpapillary discoloration, appearing as a giant white spot, occurs rarely in severe cases of multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome. The distinctive appearance may suggest a disorder other than multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome, which can make initial diagnosis more difficult and lead to unnecessary or inappropriate testing and treatment.
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ranking = 8770.8079561453
keywords = white spot, spot, white
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10/279. Hypofluorescent spots on indocyanine green angiography at the recovery stage in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the fundus lesions in a young woman. methods: Visual function, ophthalmoscopy, electrophysiology, fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography were performed. RESULTS: A 24-year-old woman had decreased visual acuity (0.2), granularity in the macula, and multiple yellow-white patches in the fundus, reduced a wave on electroretinography, hyperfluorescence on fluorescein angiography, and hypofluorescence on indocyanine green angiography in the left eye. When visual acuity improved to 1.0, the white dots disappeared ophthalmoscopically, and fluorescein angiography showed normal findings. Hypofluorescent spots were found, however, on indocyanine green angiography. CONCLUSION: It is possible that signs of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome may remain longer during examination by indocyanine green angiography than by visual function, ophthalmoscopy, or fluorescein angiography.
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ranking = 228.71471398224
keywords = spot, white
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