Cases reported "Retinal Perforations"

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11/104. Persistent indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence 6 weeks after intraocular ICG administration for macular hole surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Macular hole surgery including vitrectomy and peeling of epiretinal membranes and the internal limiting membrane (ILM) has become a standard procedure in retinal surgery. Poor visualization of epiretinal membranes and the ILM is an obstacle to successful surgery. Recently, indocyanine green (ICG) has been reported to be a helpful intraocular substance in identifying these membranes. methods: In a case of stage IV macular hole, epiretinal membranes and ILM were intraoperatively stained with three drops of 1:9 diluted ICG. After 1 min incubation the vitreous cavity was rinsed with Ringer's lactate solution, and the membranes were peeled. Autologous thrombocytes were applied to the macular hole, and the eye was endotamponaded with 20% SF6 gas. Six weeks postoperatively, visual acuity was measured and fundus photographs and autofluorescence images, as well as a multifocal ERG, were obtained. RESULTS: Intraoperatively, the ILM could be nicely visualized by ICG, which allowed immediate peeling. Six weeks after surgery, the visual acuity had improved from 0.1 to 0.7 and the macular hole was closed. Autofluorescence imaging at 795 nm revealed a strong signal. Multifocal ERG recording showed regular amplitudes. CONCLUSION: ICG as an intraocular tool for staining of the ILM is helpful in macular hole surgery. We did not observe any negative effect on retinal function; however, we were surprised to identify traces of ICG in retinal fluorescein angiography images 6 weeks postoperatively.
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keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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12/104. Thinning and small holes at an impending tear of a retinal pigment epithelial detachment.

    BACKGROUND: A tear of a retinal pigment epithelial detachment (PED) suddenly exposes a large area of bare Bruch's membrane. We report here the case of a patient whom we observed during the gradual, spontaneous development of a PED tear. METHOD: A 5.25-year case study of a 67-year-old woman with bilateral serous PEDs. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) thinning or small holes were seen along the PED margin in both eyes. Fluorescein angiograms showed intense hyperfluorescence without leakage, and indocyanine green angiography showed choroidal vessels through regions of RPE thinning or small holes. Optical coherence tomographs showed an interruption of a hyperreflective band corresponding to retinal pigment epithelium. A typical tear of the PED ensued later. CONCLUSION: Multiple, small regions of RPE thinning or holes along the margin of PED can be a sign of an impending PED tear.
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ranking = 0.00029765118605375
keywords = membrane
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13/104. Fundus autofluorescence in macular hole surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Macular holes usually are diagnosed by biomicroscopy. fluorescence angiography (FLA) is helpful especially for judging early stages or pseudoforamina. The importance of fundus-autofluorescence in macular hole surgery was studied. patients AND methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with macular holes (n = 21) and clinically-similar appearances (n = 4) were examined biomicroscopically. In addition, fundus-autofluorescence and FLA were determined by Heidelberg-Retina-Angiograph (HRA, Heidelberg, germany). A vitrectomy was performed on 16 patients with macular hole stage II, III, and IV, and membrane peeling was performed if necessary. Platelet-concentrate as an adjuvant agent was used in all surgeries, and all 16 patients were examined afterward. RESULTS: In all patients with macular hole stage III and IV (n = 18), fundus-autofluorescence revealed a marked hyperfluorescent spot in the foveolar region and also a hyperfluorescence in FLA. patients with macular hole stage II (n = 3) showed a slight punctured hyperautofluorescence and a subtle window-defect in the FLA. Postoperatively, the autofluorescence was normal in all eyes with a closed macular hole (87.5%). In some patients, a variable punctured hyperautofluorescence was noticed (n = 3). In eyes with pseudoforamina, the autofluorescence was normal (n = 4). CONCLUSION: In macular hole diagnostics, fun-dus-autofluorescence is able to replace invasive fluorescence angiography. The autofluorescence is helpful for the examination of pseudoforamina and might be useful for estimating therapeutic success.
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ranking = 0.00029765118605375
keywords = membrane
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14/104. A rapid and successful treatment for airbag-related traumatic macular hole.

    A 28-year-old female was diagnosed as having an airbag-related traumatic macular hole in the right eye 9 days subsequent to a traffic accident. Four weeks after the trauma, the patient's visual acuity was deteriorating to 20/600. Following vitrectomy, membrane peeling, use of autologous serum and intraocular gas tamponade, the hole healed within 12 days, more rapidly than the expected interval for the treatment of a traumatic macular hole. The visual acuities at the 3-month and 1-year follow-up examinations were 20/50, much better than the conventional surgical treatment of idiopathic macular hole and comparable to previous reports of the treatment of traumatic macular hole. vitrectomy procedure has been proved to be effective for the treatment of traumatic macular hole. vitrectomy combined with membrane peeling, autologous serum and intraocular gas tamponade can heal the traumatic macular hole more rapidly than the conventional treatment with vitrectomy only.
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ranking = 0.00059530237210751
keywords = membrane
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15/104. Senile schisis detachment with posterior outer layer breaks.

    BACKGROUND: Senile retinoschisis with associated retinal detachment in the presence of multiple or large posterior outer layer breaks is rare. Despite many and significant developments in vitreoretinal surgery for this situation, no definitive therapeutic guidelines exist. In an observational study three different approaches performed by two of the authors are presented. methods: Eighteen eyes of 18 patients with symptomatic schisis detachment and large posterior outer layer breaks were analyzed retrospectively. The fovea was detached in six eyes. Four eyes had laser photocoagulation and/or transscleral cryopexy (Group I), and five eyes had extensive scleral buckling (Group II). In nine eyes primary vitrectomy and gas endotamponade were performed, including inner layer resection in two eyes (Group III). The median follow-up period was 13 months. RESULTS: Initial anatomic success, which was defined as complete reattachment of the outer retinal layer, was achieved in two of four eyes of Group I, in four of five eyes of Group II, and in seven of nine eyes of Group III. Inner layer separation persisted in 11 of 16 eyes. visual acuity improved in 3 of 18 eyes, remained unchanged in 9 of 18 eyes, and worsened in 6 of 18 eyes. Complications included in Group I were persistent outer retinal layer detachment (two eyes); in Group II, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) detachment (one eye), CME (one eye), diplopia (one eye), late redetachment (one eye); in Group III, secondary rhegmatogenous detachment (one eye) PVR detachment (two eyes), macular pucker (one eye), preexisting CME (two eyes), subretinal perfluorocarbon liquid (one eye), transient central serous detachment (one eye), and nuclear sclerosis (five of eight eyes). CONCLUSION: Photocoagulation alone may be considered a first approach in selected cases of schisis detachment complicated by large posterior outer layer breaks. By use of present surgical techniques, today pars plana vitrectomy is the most rational approach allowing an exact evaluation of the complex retinal architecture, a controlled coagulation, and an adequate tamponade of the involved area. Resection of the inner layer seems to increase the risk for epiretinal membrane formation.
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ranking = 0.33303568214728
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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16/104. Spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole.

    PURPOSE: To report eight cases of spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. DESIGN : Consecutive observational case series. patients AND methods: In a consecutive series of 18 eyes of 18 patients with traumatic macular hole, eight patients achieved spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. Clinical records of the eight eyes of eight patients were reviewed, together with the results of optical coherence tomography performed in three eyes. RESULTS: All eight patients with spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole were males, with a mean age of 14.6 years (range, 11-21 years). The major cause of blunt trauma was sports-related accidents. Six eyes developed visual symptoms immediately after trauma and two eyes 10 to 12 days later. In all eight eyes, contact lens biomicroscopy revealed a small, full-thickness macular hole not complicated by epiretinal membrane, cuff of subretinal fluid, or posterior vitreous detachment. The macular hole closed spontaneously 1 week to 4 months after trauma. All eight eyes had visual acuity improvement with the final best-corrected visual acuity of 0.5 or better in four (50%) eyes. Optical coherence tomography in three eyes revealed two distinct abnormalities. Two eyes presented with acute foveal dehiscence without involvement of the posterior vitreous cortex. The remaining eye showed at presentation perifoveal vitreous detachment with residual vitreous adhesion to the edge of updrawn fovea and developed release of the vitreofoveal adhesion at the time of hole closure. CONCLUSIONS: Spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole is not uncommon. An observation for a period of up to four months may be a management of choice for traumatic macular hole. There may be clinically and pathogenetically two distinct mechanisms of traumatic macular formation; one type that causes immediate visual loss due to primary dehiscence of the fovea, and the other type that leads to delayed visual loss due to dehiscence of the fovea secondary to persistent vitreofoveal adhesion.
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ranking = 0.33303568214728
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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17/104. Vitreous surgery combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for traumatic macular hole with severe retinal folds.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of a traumatic macular hole with severe retinal folds in which vitreous surgery combined with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling was beneficial. To demonstrate that the area from which the ILM was peeled can be clearly differentiated by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. methods: A posterior hyaloid detachment was created during vitreous surgery on a 34 year old man with a traumatic macular hole. The remaining vitreous was resected and the ILM was peeled. The fundus was examined through a scanning laser ophthalmoscope before and after the surgery. RESULTS: The retinal folds disappeared concurrently with the detachment of the ILM, resulting in closure of the macular hole. The area from which the ILM was peeled was clearly observed through the scanning laser ophthalmoscope. CONCLUSION: In this patient, it was helpful to perform not only posterior hyaloid detachment but also ILM peeling. The scanning laser ophthalmoscope was highly useful for observing the area from which the ILM was peeled.
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ranking = 0.0014882559302688
keywords = membrane
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18/104. Altered uptake of infrared diode laser by retina after intravitreal indocyanine green dye and internal limiting membrane peeling.

    PURPOSE: To report an altered uptake and possible complication associated with the use of indocyanine green (ICG) dye, internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, and infrared diode laser. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: In two eyes (two patients) three-port pars plana vitrectomy was performed. indocyanine green was injected into the vitreous cavity according to previously published protocol. The ILM was removed with a bent-tipped microvitreoretinal blade and ILM forceps. Photocoagulation was performed with an 810-nm infrared diode endolaser. RESULTS: Photocoagulation of the retina stained with ICG in areas with intact ILM produced more intense and superficial appearing retinal burns than photocoagulation where the ILM had been peeled. The retinal burns in areas of intact ILM stained with ICG also appeared more superficial than those typical of this laser when ICG is not used. CONCLUSIONS: indocyanine green absorbs infrared laser light and produces a photothermal effect. Unwanted damage to the inner retinal layers may occur. Laser energy may also be prevented from reaching the deeper retinal layers, reducing the efficacy of treatment.
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ranking = 0.0014882559302688
keywords = membrane
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19/104. Pathologic myopia: where are we now?.

    PURPOSE: To describe current concepts and available treatments for pathologic myopia. DESIGN: review of experimental and clinical studies. methods: The demography, natural history, medical and surgical treatments for choroidal neovascular membrane, vitreoretinal interface disorders and future strategies for pathologic myopia are reviewed. RESULTS: Several medical and surgical modalities are currently available to treat various complications of pathologic myopia. Macular translocation appears to stabilize or improve visual function in many eyes with choroidal neovascularization. CONCLUSION: Newer strategies are emerging to better ameliorate or prevent the complications of pathologic myopia.
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ranking = 0.00029765118605375
keywords = membrane
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20/104. Macular hole following photodynamic therapy.

    A 66-year-old woman with prior posterior vitreous detachment underwent photodynamic therapy with verteporfin for a juxtafoveolar choroidal neovascularization. Twenty days after the photodynamic therapy, fluorescein angiography showed regression of the membrane and the new onset of a macular hole. Macular hole formation following photodynamic therapy could be related to choroidal swelling leading to dehiscence of the foveal pit, or to exacerbation of either tangential traction or cystoid spaces by the laser administered over the fovea.
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ranking = 0.00029765118605375
keywords = membrane
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