Cases reported "Retropneumoperitoneum"

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1/7. Fatal carbon dioxide embolism as an unreported complication of retroperitoneoscopy.

    Retroperitoneoscopy has gained popularity because it offers a safe alternative to the more debilitating open approach and avoids postoperative ileus. However, this type of procedure carries certain disadvantages in terms of intraperitoneal effusions and hemodynamic changes. Major complications are exceptional. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man who died of carbon dioxide embolism during elective totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernioplasty for symptomatic left indirect inguinal hernia. With the patient under general anesthesia, the retroperitoneal space was gained through a 1. 5-cm incision made below the umbilicus. During the dissection, the patient collapsed and could not be resuscitated. At autopsy, air bubbles were admixed with blood in the epicardial veins, but no injury to vessels was demonstrated. We conclude that carbon dioxide embolism usually is caused by direct puncture of major vessels during intra-abdominal procedures. However, when this complication occurs during retroperitoneoscopy, it seems related to pressure-forced entry of carbon dioxide into the venous plexus.
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keywords = operative
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2/7. Rectal perforation, retropneumoperitoneum, and pneumomediastinum after stapling procedure for prolapsed hemorrhoids: report of a case and subsequent considerations.

    Stapling procedure is a new technique for the surgical management of third-degree hemorrhoids. Even if long-term experience has not been reported, this new technique is generating a lot of interest and its use is becoming more common in europe. Some articles have just been published about severe adverse effects of this operation, and in the present article we describe a case of a life-threatening complication that occurred with the use of the stapling technique for hemorrhoidectomy. A patient with perineal descensus and third-degree hemorrhoids underwent a stapling procedure for the treatment of hemorrhoids. retropneumoperitoneum and pneumomediastinum developed on postoperative Day 2 and a colostomy was performed, allowing a quick recovery of the patient. After six months the colostomy was closed and bowel function restored. Our experience, taken together with some other cases previously published of severe complications after such an operation, suggests caution in the use of this new technique for the treatment of a benign disease.
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keywords = operative
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3/7. Bilateral pneumothoraces, pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum, pneumoretroperitoneum, and subcutaneous emphysema following intubation with a double-lumen endotracheal tube for thoracoscopic anterior spinal release and fusion in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis.

    Recently, thoracoscopic approaches to the spine have taken on greater clinical applications in the treatment of spinal deformity with generally good results. However, the steep learning curve must be ascended by the surgeon and may lead to complications early in one's experience. There also exists a learning curve for the anesthesiologist to become adept at obtaining single lung ventilation and managing this throughout the operative procedure. We report a case of an 11-year-old patient with severe scoliosis who developed air in both chest cavities, mediastinum, peritoneum, retroperitoneum, and subcutaneous tissue after intubation with a double-lumen endotracheal tube. The patient remained hemodynamically stable throughout this period, and bilateral chest tubes were placed. The patient remained on the ventilator for 24 hours and was extubated without sequelae. Complications from a thoracoscopic approach to the spine for deformity are most often attributed to the learning curve of the surgeon; however, the entire operative team becomes exposed to the challenges of performing this procedure. This report documents a life-threatening complication of air throughout the chest, mediastinum, abdomen, and subcutaneous tissues in a patient with severe scoliosis.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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4/7. pneumorrhachis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, and pneumoretroperitoneum after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis: report of a case.

    This article presents the first known case of pneumorrhachis (spinal air), pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, pneumoretroperitoneum, and subcutaneous emphysema after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. We review the patient's medical history, clinical and laboratory findings, radiographic data, and operative records, as well as the relevant literature. We describe the case of a young male with ulcerative colitis who developed pneumorrhachis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumoretroperitoneum, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardium after a proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Unlike the case we report, previously described episodes of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema in patients with ulcerative colitis developed before operative intervention. We offer possible explanations for these unusual complications based on analysis of this case and thorough review of the literature.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/7. Localized intra- and retroperitoneal gas collections following intraoperative use of surgical gelatine sponge.

    Following recent intra- or retroperitoneal surgery, four children in whom hemostasis was obtained by means of abundant use of surgical gelatine sponge, displayed unusual bubbly air collections in the region of the operation. Three of them had vague inflammatory symptoms and signs, while in the fourth the gas was discovered incidentally. The connection between the radiological finding and the hemostatic agent is presented. In the typical case manifesting a mild clinical course, knowledge of this association helps to guard against the diagnosis of abscess, and subsequent unnecessary reoperation can be avoided.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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6/7. Retroperitoneal and abdominal wall emphysema after transanal excision of a rectal carcinoma.

    The use of transanal excision to remove rectal carcinomas is a relatively new application of this surgical procedure, which may require full thickness excision. Retroperitoneal and abdominal wall emphysema are potential complications of surgical procedures that breach the wall of the colon and rectum. Computed tomographic scans provide the clearest diagnostic picture of developing emphysema, and prompt diagnosis through accurate interpretation of the scans is essential to minimize morbidity and mortality. When the diagnosis is made early and no active infection accompanies the emphysema, the preferred approach to initial treatment is nonsurgical. This article presents a case in which local transanal excision was performed on a 70-year-old male to remove a superficial adenocarcinoma from the lower rectal wall. He developed postoperative retroperitoneal and abdominal wall emphysema. Conservative treatment is discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/7. Abdominal hypertension and disproportion: a universal and fundamental disorder which varies from minor to major but is not well known.

    Abdominal hypertension/disproportion occurs in older patients as hernias (inguinal, umbilical, diaphragmatic, recurrent, etc.), in immature mothers whose uteri and abdomens are not ready for pregnancy, and as postoperative distention and abdominal wound dehiscence.
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