Cases reported "Rhabdomyolysis"

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1/8. A case of acute renal failure and compartment syndrome after an alcoholic binge.

    A 25 year old man presented with anuria and bilateral leg pain two days after an alcoholic binge. He subsequently developed rhabdomyolysis causing acute renal failure, with compartment syndrome of both lower legs. This required urgent dialysis and fasciotomy respectively within six hours of admission. He remained dialysis dependent for three weeks and only after four months was he able to weight bear on both legs. Alcohol is a leading cause of rhabdomyolysis. Early recognition and prompt treatment is essential to prevent serious complications.
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2/8. Acute renal failure due to nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis following binge drinking.

    Nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis is an important but under-recognized cause of acute renal failure. In alcoholics, rhabdomyolysis most frequently develop following muscle necrosis during alcohol-induced coma, but has also been described rarely in those without prolonged coma or seizures. We describe a patient who developed myoglobinuric acute renal failure requiring dialysis following binge drinking in the absence of convulsions or coma. The renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis with pigment casts.
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3/8. Acute alcoholic myopathy, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: a case report.

    A case of middle aged male who developed swelling and weakness of muscles in the lower limbs following a heavy binge of alcohol is being reported. He had myoglobinuria and developed acute renal failure for which he was dialyzed. Acute alcoholic myopathy is not a well recognized condition and should be considered in any intoxicated patient who presents with muscle tenderness and weakness.
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4/8. Acute rhabdomyolysis and brachial plexopathy following alcohol ingestion.

    An unusual case of brachial plexopathy following alcohol-induced rhabdomyolysis is presented. The patient's rhabdomyolysis developed during sleep after an acute alcohol binge and there was no history of muscle trauma. It is thought that the brachial plexopathy developed due to direct compression of the plexus from swollen muscles of the shoulder girdle. The lack of similar reported cases despite the common clinical scenario of prolonged unconsciousness following excess alcohol intake suggests that other factors may be important in the development of muscle and nerve damage in susceptible individuals.
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5/8. rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, and multiple focal neuropathies after drinking alcohol soaked with centipede.

    Many Chinese like to drink alcohol soaked with creatures for promoting health. This study reports a 49-year-old male who presented with multiple focal neuropathies of the upper limbs, coagulopathy, erythematous swelling of the bilateral upper extremities and trunk with bullous skin lesions, and rhabdomyolysis associated with acute renal failure after drinking alcohol soaked with centipede. Soaking a centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, in 53% alcohol, produced the wine. Supportive treatment was administered, and the skin lesions and renal failure improved with subsequent neurologic deficit during the week following initial presentation. Alcohol binge or immobilization was the likely cause of neuropathy, bullous skin lesions and rhabdomyolysis in the patient. However, there is a possibility that centipede venom also contributed to the illness in this patient.
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6/8. rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria associated with violent exercise and alcohol abuse: report of two cases.

    Two cases of acute rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuria and high levels of serum enzyme are presented. The first patient developed acute renal insufficiency in the context of a binge and heavy alcohol drinking lasting several days. He was treated with haemodialysis for three weeks, and survived. The second patient developed rhabdomyolysis and heavy myoglobinuria after playing squash vigorously. Forced mannitol-alkaline diuresis therapy for prophylaxis against hyperkalaemia and metabolic acidosis was performed. He did not develop renal failure. The clinical features, pathology and treatment of rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria are summarized.
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7/8. cocaine and rhabdomyolysis: report of a case and review of the literature.

    cocaine abuse is associated with a constellation of serious medical complications. An unrecognized and recently described complication of cocaine use is rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure. We describe the first patient identified in our institution with this entity, admitted to the medical services with oliguric acute renal failure. Three days prior to admission the patient had a cocaine snorting binge. He presented with bilateral flank pain, gross hematuria, vomiting and chills. No history of crush injury, prolonged immobilization and or seizures was reported. On admission the vital signs were normal, physical exam revealed periorbital edema and marked soft tissue neck swelling. Lab values: Bun 120 mgs%, Creat. 10.7 mgs%, Na 132 meq/lt, Co2 13mq/lt, Cl, 103meq/lt, Co2 13meq/lt, Ca 5.3 mgs%, CPK 30,800 U/L with a MM fraction of 98%, LDH 600 U/L, SGOT 300 U/L. The urine was dark red with a ph of 6.5 and 100 rbc/hpf. The anti-GBM antibody and blood cultures were negative. An abdominal sonogram was normal. He received peritoneal dialysis and was discharged on his 14th hospital day with a CPK of 2,800 U/L and decreasing azotemia. cocaine associated rhabdomyolysis has only been recently described in the literature (AJM April, 88). Acute myoglobinuric renal failure needs to be added to the growing list of medical complications of cocaine use.
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8/8. Acute renal failure after binge drinking of alcohol and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug ingestion.

    A case of reversible acute renal failure (ARF) following binge drinking together with the transient use of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) is described. After binge drinking. the patient experienced hyperdipsia, and the volume of his urine decreased. Subsequently, he took an NSAID to relieve systemic joint pain associated with low grade fever, and then he had complete anuria. One day after taking the NSAID, he visited our hospital, and was found to have severe renal dysfunction accompanied by severe liver damage (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations were 57 and 5.4 mg/dl, respectively). The impaired renal function progressed over the first three hospital days, as reflected by an elevated creatinine concentration to 11.6 mg/dl. Nine treatment sessions of hemodialysis were, therefore, required to recover the loss of renal function. The present case suggests that binge drinking may be a potential risk factor for ARF in the presence of NSAIDs.
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