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1/22. Occupational IgE-mediated asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria caused by Easter lily (lilium longiflorum) and tulip.

    BACKGROUND: We report on IgE-mediated asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria to two liliaceae plants, tulip and Easter lily (lilium longiflorum), diagnosed in a floral shop worker. methods: Occupational asthma was diagnosed according to patient history, PEF monitoring, and a work-simulating provocation test. Flower-specific IgE was studied, and RAST inhibition tests were performed. RESULTS: Skin prick testing showed positive reactions to tulip, Easter lily, and chrysanthemum. Total IgE was 180 kU/I, and specific IgE to tulip was 2.6 and to Easter lily 6.5 kU/I. In the RAST-inhibition test, no cross-reactivity was found. Occupational asthma was diagnosed by peak flow monitoring at work and at home, as well as specific inhalation challenge with Easter lily, with an immediate 18% reduction in PEF. In addition, contact urticaria and conjunctivitis were diagnosed. After a 9-year follow-up without exposure to lilies, the skin prick tests to L. longiflorum and tulip were still positive, but the specific IgE had disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: A case of IgE-mediated occupational asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and contact urticaria caused by L. longiflorum and tulip is presented. RAST inhibition tests indicated concomitant sensitization to the two liliaceae plants.
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2/22. Occupational IgE-mediated allergy to tribolium confusum (confused flour beetle).

    BACKGROUND: We report on IgE-mediated allergy in a worker caused by tribolium confusum (confused flour beetle). These beetles lived in the "old" flour to which he was exposed in his work. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old, nonatopic mechanic in a rye crispbread factory developed rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthmatic symptoms, as well as urticaria on his wrists, lower arms, hands, neck, and face, during the maintenance and repair of machines contaminated by flour. This flour had been in and on the machines for a long time, and it contained small beetles. The patient did not suffer any symptoms when handling fresh, clean flour. RESULTS: Skin prick tests with standard environmental allergens, storage mites, enzymes, flours, and molds were negative. A prick test with flour from the machines gave a 10-mm reaction. An open application of the same flour caused urticarial whealing on the exposed skin. Prick tests with fresh flour from the factory were negative. A prick test with minced T. confusum from the flour in the machines gave a 7-mm reaction. histamine hydrochloride 10 mg/ml gave a 7-mm reaction. Specific serum IgE antibodies to T. confusum were elevated at 17.2 kU/l. Prick tests with the flour from the machines were negative in five control patients. CONCLUSIONS: The patient had occupational contact urticaria, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthmatic symptoms from exposure to flour. His symptoms were caused by immediate allergy to the beetle T. confusum. Immediate allergy to this beetle has rarely been reported in connection with respiratory symptoms, but it may be more common. Contact urticaria from this source has not been reported before.
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3/22. Occupational asthma caused by grass pea used in the industrial processing of parquet.

    BACKGROUND: although grass pea belongs to the leguminoseae family, allergic reactions to its flour have rarely been described. Clinical and immunological studies were performed to confirm a type I hypersensitivity mechanism in a case of occupational asthma to grass pea flour exposure, used in the industrial processing of parquet. methods: occupational asthma was diagnosed according to patient history, PEFR monitoring and a specific bronchial challenge test. Skin prick test with an aqueous grass pea flour extract, specific IgE determinations (CAP assay) and IgE immunoblot tests were performed. RESULTS: skin prick test with the extract showed a positive immediate response, and negative response in controls. Specific IgE to grass pea was positive (9.57 KU/l). immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of specific serum IgE that recognized 3 proteins in the extract (MW 46, 32 and 28 kDa). PEFR monitoring showed positive results. Bronchial challenge test with the extract elicited an isolated immediate response. CONCLUSIONS: as far as we know this is the first time that IgE mediated occupational asthma caused by grass pea is reported and it is also the first time that its allergens are characterized. Grass pea flour might constitute a relevant occupational allergen in this unreported source of exposure in parquet manufacturers.
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4/22. Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma in a wool worker caused by Dermestidae spp.

    BACKGROUND: The family Dermestidae belongs to the order Coleoptera. Occupational allergy has been described in museum personnel. A 31-year-old male wool worker presenting rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma episodes probably linked to exposure to Dermestidae-infected wool was investigated. methods: Extracts prepared either from insect bodies or from dust from parasitized wool were used for skin prick testing (SPT), conjunctival and bronchial provocation tests and in vitro determinations. RESULTS: SPT and provocation tests were positive to both extracts. PEFR measurement demonstrated the association between the patient's symptoms and occupational exposure to Dermestidae. Specific IgE to both extracts was detected and immunoblotting revealed several protein bands from 5 to 200 kDa that were reactive to IgE from the patient's serum. CONCLUSIONS: Dermestidae exposure in wool workers when handling parasitized wool can be a cause of IgE-mediated rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.
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ranking = 307.17148352317
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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5/22. Buckwheat pillow-induced asthma and allergic rhinitis.

    BACKGROUND: Immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated hypersensitivity is a mechanism suggested to explain adverse reactions to buckwheat. This is the first reported case in the united states of a person who developed asthma and worsening allergic rhinitis after exposure to a buckwheat pillow. OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient who developed asthma and worsening allergic rhinitis after exposure to a buckwheat pillow and to provide evidence that the adverse reaction was IgE-mediated. methods: The patient underwent skin prick and ImmunoCAP testing (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Kalamazoo, MI) to buckwheat as well as skin prick testing to several environmental allergens. RESULTS: The patient showed a 4 skin prick test response to buckwheat. He also showed 4 positive skin prick responses to multiple trees, grasses, and weeds, alternaria, helminthosporium, dog, and histamine control and was 3 positive to house-dust mites, penicillium, aspergillus, cat, and feather mix. His negative control was negative. His ImmunoCAP test for buckwheat-specific IgE was class 4, or strongly positive. He had normal spirometry values. Performance of house-dust mite avoidance measures did not result in improvement of the patient's symptoms. Removal of the patient's two buckwheat pillows resulted in resolution of his asthma and improvement of rhinitis symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The positive skin prick and ImmunoCAP test to buckwheat along with the positive clinical response to buckwheat pillow elimination support an IgE-mediated mechanism in explaining our patient's buckwheat pillow-induced asthma and allergic rhinitis.
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6/22. Bronchial asthma due to sensitization to chloramine T.

    Chloramine T, an organic, highly reactive derivative of chlorine with potent bactericidal properties, is used as a disinfectant in the food industry. Described as an occupational sensitizer in 1945 for the first time, it produces late or dual asthma, occasionally accompanied by fever and leukocytosis, which is mediated by IgE. We present the case of a male dairy worker who, after 4 years of exposure to the product, developed rhinitis and asthma. skin tests with chloramine T were positive at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, while all other allergens tested negative. RAST detected specific IgE at 12 PRU and bronchial provocation induced immediate and late bronchoconstriction.
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7/22. deer ked-induced occupational allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    BACKGROUND: deer keds (elk fly) have not previously been described as a cause of respiratory or conjunctival sensitization. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of IgE-mediated allergic rhinoconjunctivitis from occupational exposure to deer ked. methods: Skin prick testing (SPT) was performed with pollens, animal danders, mites, molds, and deer ked. The serum deer ked-specific IgE level was examined in ImmunoSpot and radioallergosorbent test assays, and deer ked IgE-binding fractions and their specificities were examined in immunoblot and immunoblot inhibition assays. Nasal provocation testing (NPT) and conjunctival provocation testing (CPT) were performed to detect the association between deer ked sensitization and rhinoconjunctival symptoms. Both SPT and NPT were performed with deer ked whole-body extract, whereas CPT was performed with deer ked wing. RESULTS: The results of SPT, NPT, and CPT were positive for deer ked. In laboratory tests, serum deer ked-specific IgE antibodies were demonstrated in radioallergosorbent test and ImmunoSpot assays. In immunoblot, IgE-binding bands were demonstrated at 17, 33, 70, and 85 kDa, which were clearly inhibited with deer ked extract but not with the control extract. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational IgE-mediated rhinoconjunctival allergy to deer ked was confirmed in this patient.
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ranking = 305.17148352317
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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8/22. Allergy to sea fishing baits.

    We report a new case of rhinitis and asthma caused by sea fishing baits. The results showed exposure to Sipunculus nudus (Phylum Sipuncula; order Sipunculida: Sipunculidae) to be the main cause of the allergic symptoms. The intervention of IgE was demonstrated, with the presence of cross-reactions with allergenic extracts from other worm species used as baits, belonging to different orders of annelida.
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9/22. Looking for immunotolerance: a case of allergy to baker's yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    We describe one case of baker's yeast true allergy in a boy with previously diagnosed mite-allergy and atopic dermatitis. At the age of 6, being atopic dermatitis and rhinitis well controlled by drugs, he began to experience generalized urticaria and asthma after eating pizza and bread, but only fresh from the oven. The diagnostic workup revealed single sensitization to baker's yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae), and a severe systemic reaction also occurred during the prick-by-prick procedure. After discussing with parents, no special dietary restriction was suggested but the use of autoinjectable adrenaline and on demand salbutamol. A diary of symptoms was recorded by means of a visual-analog scale. During the subsequent 2 years, the severity of symptoms was progressively reduced, and presently urticaria has disappeared. Only cough persists, invariantly after eating just-baked and yeast-containing foods. If bread, pizza and cakes are ate more than one hour after preparation, no symptom occur at all. Baker's yeast is a common component of everyday diet and it usually acts as an allergen only by the inhalatory route. We speculate that the continuous exposure to saccharomyces in foods may have lead to an immunotolerance with a progressive reduction of symptoms, whereas why the allergens is active only in ready-baked foods remains unexplained.
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10/22. Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma by exposure to lathyrus sativus flour.

    We report the case of a 42-year-old non-smoking man, who had worked as a carpenter for 6 years and who reported a history of rhinorrhea, paroxysmal sneezing, nasocular pruritus, lacrimation, wheezing and dyspnea attacks while preparing a mixture to seal the junctures between wooden panels. Allergy study consisted of skin prick testing (SPT) to inhalants, foods and lathyrus sativus flour (LSF) extract, specific bronchial provocation test with LSF extract, cytological analysis of sputum, specific IgE antibodies against LSF, and histamine releasing test with dilutions (1:5, 1:25, 1:125, 1:625) of LSF. The results demonstrated occupational rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma due to LSF exposure. We provide a review of published reports to date.
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