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1/5. tobacco allergy: demonstration of cross-reactivity with other members of solanaceae family and mugwort pollen.

    BACKGROUND: tobacco is a plant belonging to the solanaceae family. This plant is usually used as a contact insecticide for several infestations in some areas, such as the Canary islands. Allergy induced by inhalation of this plant is unusual. Identification of the potential allergen in growing areas is essential. OBJECTIVE: We report a patient with occupational sensitivity to an aqueous solution of cut tobacco whose clinical manifestations were rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria. Past medical history was significant for seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis to mugwort pollen and oral allergy syndrome with avocado. methods: Green tobacco and cured tobacco leaf extracts were prepared, skin prick tests were performed with green tobacco, cured tobacco leaf extracts, and certain aeroallergens. Conjunctival challenge test was carried out with green tobacco and cured tobacco leaf extract. serum-specific IgE against tobacco leaf was performed by commercial CAP. CAP inhibition experiments were carried out with tobacco and artemisia vulgaris. RESULTS: Skin prick tests and conjunctival challenge tests with green tobacco and cured tobacco leaf extracts were positive, as well as serum-specific IgE by CAP, indicating an IgE-mediated sensitization. CAP inhibition experiments were carried out and it was found that tobacco, mugwort pollen, and tomato extracts inhibited the binding of the patient's serum to solid-phase tobacco leaf. No inhibition was observed when alternaria, D. pteronyssinus, and potato were used as control inhibitors. Inhibition of immunoCAP to mugwort was obtained with mugwort and tobacco extracts and no cross-reactivity to D. pteronyssinus was shown. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that tobacco can induce IgE-mediated reactions that are mediated by the existence of common antigenic epitopes between tobacco and mugwort pollen. This allergy can be a hazard of employment in the agricultural areas.
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keywords = mugwort
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2/5. Fennel, cucumber, and melon allergy successfully treated with pollen-specific injection immunotherapy.

    BACKGROUND: In subjects with both pollinosis and vegetable food allergy, most allergenic epitopes of fruits and vegetables are present in pollen. A recent study showed a marked reduction or a total disappearance of apple-induced oral allergy syndrome in patients receiving injection immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether vegetable food allergy following other kinds of primary pollinosis may be successfully treated with pollen-specific immunotherapy. methods: A 34-year-old woman with long-standing pollinosis and typical oral allergy syndrome (OAS) with the ingestion of both fennel and cucumber and whose OAS was associated with immediate laryngeal edema after the ingestion of melon, was treated with two commercial depot aluminum hydroxide-adsorbed extracts of 1 grass pollen and 2 mugwort pollen 50% ragweed pollen 50%. RESULTS: After 36 months of injection specific immunotherapy, the patient was able to tolerate both fresh fennel and cucumber without consequence on open oral challenge tests. After 43 months of immunotherapy, the patient tolerated fresh melon as well on open oral challenge. She has re-introduced these vegetables in her normal diet. skin tests showed no reactivity to fresh fennel and there was a reduction of the wheal induced by fresh cucumber. CONCLUSION: Vegetable food allergy following primary sensitization to pollens, other than birch, may also be effectively reduced by pollen-specific injection immunotherapy.
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keywords = mugwort
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3/5. food allergy and IgE sensitization caused by spices: CICBAA data (based on 589 cases of food allergy).

    BACKGROUND: spices originate in various botanical families: apiaceae, lamiaceae, lauraceae, Leguminosae, liliaceae, myristicaceae, myrtaceae, piperaceae, solanaceae, zingiberaceae.... METHODOLOGY: Prick-tests to native spices have been carried out in patients suspected of food allergies to spices. The CICBAA data bank includes 589 cases of food allergies, a part of which has benefited from investigations for spices. Data about the rate of sensitization and food allergy are available. RESULTS: Frequent sensitization to apiaceae is observed: coriander, caraway, fennel, celery: 32% of prick-tests in children, 23% of prick-tests in adults. Sensitization to liliaceae: garlic, onion, chive, is observed in 4.6% of prick-tests in children, 7.7% of prick-tests in adults. Rare cases of sensitization to paprika and saffron are recorded. Prick-tests to nutmeg, ginger and clove are currently negative. 10 food allergies related to the mugwort-celery-spices syndrome are reported: coriander: 1, caraway: 2, fennel: 3, garlic: 3, onion: 1. food allergy to spices is unfrequent: 2% of the totality of food allergies. However, only adults are allergic to spices and allergy to spices accounts for 6.4% of food allergies in adults. Tiny amount of proteins are usually ingested. patients at risk of spice allergy are young adults sensitized to mugwort and birch allergens, sharing cross-sensitization with various food vegetal allergens. The clinical suspicion raises from frequent post-prandial systemic reactions. Other allergens of vegetal origin have to be cleared. diagnosis can be established by DBPCFC using powdered spices in capsules.
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keywords = mugwort
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4/5. Severe oral allergy syndrome and anaphylactic reactions caused by a Bet v 1- related PR-10 protein in soybean, SAM22.

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactic reactions to soy products have been attributed to stable class 1 food allergens. OBJECTIVE: IgE- mediated reactions to a soy-containing dietary food product in patients allergic to birch pollen were investigated. methods: Detailed case histories were taken from 20 patients. Their sera were analyzed for IgE (UniCAP) specific for birch, grass, mugwort, the recombinant birch allergens rBet v 1 and rBet v2, and soy protein. Extracts from birch pollen, soy isolate, rBet v 1, and the recombinant PR-10 soy protein rSAM22 were coupled to paper disks or nitrocellulose for IgE measurements (enzyme allergosorbent test) or Western blot analysis. Enzyme allergosorbent testing, Western blot inhibition, and histamine release studies were performed with the same allergens. RESULTS: Most patients (17/20) experienced facial, oropharyngeal, and/or systemic allergic symptoms within 20 minutes after ingesting the soy product for the first time. Birch pollen allergy (16/20) was common, along with oral allergy syndrome to apple (12/20) or hazelnut (11/20). IgE levels to birch and Bet v 1 but not to other inhalants were high in 18 of 20 patients. Significant IgE binding to rSAM22 occurred in 17 of 20 patients. Blot experiments with the soy isolate revealed IgE-binding bands at 17 kd (15/20), 22 kd (1/20), and 35 to 38 kd (2/20); the former was inhibited by preincubation of the sera with rBet v 1 or rSAM22. Birch extract and soy isolate, rBet v 1, and rSAM22 induced dose-dependent histamine release in the nanomolar range. CONCLUSION: Immediate-type allergic symptoms in patients with birch pollen allergy after ingestion of soy protein-containing food items can result from cross-reactivity of Bet v 1 -specific IgE to homologous pathogenesis-related proteins, particularly the PR-10 protein SAM22.
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keywords = mugwort
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5/5. Allergic reactions to honey and royal jelly and their relationship with sensitization to compositae.

    honey and royal jelly are complex etherogeneous mixtures of flowers' nectar, sugars, proteins and bee's glandular secretions. The existence of a type I hypersensitivity to honey is still matter of debate, while an aetiological role of Compositae pollens in the clinical manifestations following honey ingestion has been envisaged. We describe two cases of severe systemic reactions (anaphylaxis and generalized urticaria/angioedema) due to honey and royal jelly ingestion in patients sensitized to compositae (mugwort). Both patients had a skin and RAST positivity to mugwort and a positive prick-by-prick to the offending foods. Moreover, in one of the two patients the RAST-inhibition assay showed the strong cross-reactivity between the proteins of honey and mugwort and the SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the major proteic bands from honey and mugwort extracts are largely superimposable. Both the clinical data and the laboratory analysis support the hypothesis of a strict link between sensitization to compositae and adverse reactions to honey and jelly.
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keywords = mugwort
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