Cases reported "Rhinitis, Atrophic"

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1/10. Twenty-three cases of atrophic rhinitis treated by deep puncture at three points in the nasal region.

    Atrophic rhinitis is a disease which manifests itself mainly by anosmia due to dryness and atrophy of the nasal mucosa. There is no specific therapy for the disease at present. In the past few years, 23 cases of atrophic rhinitis were treated mainly by deep puncture at three points in the nasal region with satisfactory results. In order to find out the functional changes of the nasal mucosa, the mucociliary transport rate (MTR), surface temperature of the conchal mucosa, acid-base scale of nasal secretion, and volume of nasal secretion were determined before and after the treatment.
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2/10. Pin hole nasal prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Atrophic rhinitis is a debilitating nasal mucosal disease characterized by foul-smelling discharge of crusts and enlargement of the nasal cavity. Numerous surgical and nonsurgical methods have been advocated for its treatment. This article describes a noninvasive technique for partial occlusion of the dilated nasal cavity in a patient with atrophic rhinitis by use of a pinhole nasal prosthesis made from clear acrylic resin.
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3/10. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia presenting as atrophic rhinitis.

    Atrophic rhinitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nose. The aetiology of primary atrophic rhinitis is not yet known, although secondary atrophic rhinitis is known to be associated with chronic granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The authors report a case of atrophic rhinitis, which was a presenting feature of a rare genetic disorder known as Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome, also known as anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.
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4/10. Atrophic rhinitis in a patient with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    We would like to present the rare case of a now 37-year old female patient with autosomal-recessively inherited anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia being treated in our ENT department for atrophic rhinitis. The clinical appearance very much resembled the picture of an "empty nose" with distinct hypoplasia of the turbinates and extensively wide nasal cavities. We want to point out the possible existence of atrophic rhinitis against the background of an underlying syndromatic disease in adults and also the pediatric patient.
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5/10. pneumocephalus: a rare complication of nasal myiasis.

    Infestation of ear, nose, and throat by maggots, the larvae of the fly (genus Chrysomyia) [J Laryngol Otol 1976:393-399], is termed "myiasis." Prevalent in tropical countries, atrophic rhinitis is the most common predisposing factor for this condition. The maggots burrow into delicate membranes and feed on underlying structures, causing considerable destruction of tissues, resulting in complications such as extensive erosion of the nose, face, and orbit, with rarely meningitis and death as a result of intracranial involvement [J Laryngol Otol 1989;103:489-491]. We report a rare complication of pneumocephalus after atrophic rhinitis with nasal myiasis.
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6/10. Atrophic rhinitis: antibiotic treatment.

    Atrophic rhinitis is a term used to describe a rare nasal infection. Although it does not have a fatal outcome, cause osteomyelitis, or produce pain, it does induce bilateral nasal obstruction and a persistent foul odor of which the subject and others are painfully aware. The organism most often associated with atrophic rhinitis is klebsiella ozenae. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of this microorganism have made treatment with orally administered antibiotics difficult. K ozenae was cultured from the nasal cavity of three patients. Two patients were treated for two weeks with tobramycin (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml; 4 mg/kg/day). Odor decreased in one patient, but K ozenae failed to clear. In the second patient both odor and K ozenae disappeared. The third patient was treated for 1 week with tobramycin (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml; 4 mg/kg/day); odor decreased, but K ozenae could still be cultured. She was treated for an additional 2 weeks with topical gentamicin (MIC, 0.5 micrograms/ml) with disappearance of both odor and K ozenae. Intravenous aminoglycoside may be helpful in treating atrophic rhinitis, but topical aminoglycoside may provide an effective and cheaper form of treatment.
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7/10. Dominant inheritance in a family with primary atrophic rhinitis.

    Primary atrophic rhinitis is an uncommon condition which presents with crusts in the nose. The nasal mucosa is dry and atrophied and the nasal cavities are abnormally wide. We report a large london Irish family with an affected father with fifteen children. Eight of these have primary atrophic rhinitis. Symptoms appear around puberty, and there was one case in the third generation with an affected mother. The nasal appearances of the affected members varied considerably and many hid their disease well. The family fits well with dominant inheritance. A familial aetiology for primary atrophic rhinitis is a more attractive theory than those previously postulated.
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8/10. Primary atrophic rhinitis: a scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study.

    The surface features of atrophic rhinitis are shown and it is suggested that these explain the majority of symptoms. It seems clear that any lesion preventing the formation or maturation of large numbers of motile cilia, or the production of mucus capable of forming confluent sheets suitable for continuous propulsion, may cause atrophic rhinitis. In both familial and idiopathic forms of the disease, both abnormalities are present. It would be most interesting to know the ultrastructure of the cilia in transverse section of this condition. Transverse electron microscopic studies in retinitis pigmentosa, Usher's syndrome and Kartagener's syndrome now becoming known as the low cilia motility diseases show clearly the primary lesions in the micro-tubules and dynein arms of the cilia. A similar transmission electron microscopic study in atrophic rhinitis may show the fundamental cilial lesions. Surgical closure of the nasal passages has much to offer the patient with severe symptoms as the clinical features of the disease improve with the increasing normal micro-anatomical features demonstrated in this paper as a result of closure. This improvement in structure is not in all cases sufficient to fulfil the above criteria so a complete cure is improbable in the majority of cases.
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9/10. Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica. Report of a young man with severe disease and retrospective review of 18 cases.

    Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica (TPO) is a rare condition of unclear cause. Sporadic cases have been published from all over the world, but some geographical differences in the occurrence may exist. The condition is characterized by cartilaginous or bony outgrowths into the lumen of the tracheobronchial tree. Clinicians should include this disease in the list of differential diagnoses when confronted with symptoms like persistent and often productive cough, haemoptysis, dyspnoea and wheeze. If the condition is extensive, there may occur unexpected and acute clinical problems. We describe the case of a young man in whom we diagnosed a severe form of TPO while examining him for asthma. This patient suffered also from ozaena and the combination of these two conditions is rather common. We also retrospectively reviewed our material of 18 cases with this condition.
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10/10. Closure of the nasal vestibule in atrophic rhinitis--a new non-surgical technique.

    A new technique is described for closing the nasal vestibule in cases of secondarily-acquired atrophic rhinitis. This involves occlusion of the nasal vestibule with an obturator made from dimethylpolysiloxane. Being a non-invasive method it is specifically indicated in the management of cases of secondarily-acquired atrophic rhinitis where any surgical treatment is contra-indicated. We describe its use in a case each of unilateral and bilateral secondary atrophic rhinitis.
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