Cases reported "Rhinitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis to roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in a hunter.

    Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) is one of the most common game mammals in europe, where hundreds of thousands people are exposed to this animal. Despite this fact, we are aware of only two cases of allergy to roe deer published until recently, one case of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and the second of contact urticaria. We describe another case with co-existing allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis in a 55-year old male professional hunter. The symptoms were provoked only by exposure to roe deer, and there were no other past or present allergic diseases. Specific IgE was found to following animal allergens: cow dander (CAP class 5), goat epithelium and horse dander (each CAP class 4), dog epithelium, dog dander and swine epithelium (each CAP class 2). Skin prick tests have shown positive reaction only to cow epithelium ( ). Because of lack of deer dander allergen for specific IgE and skin tests, we have confirmed the causal relationship between exposure to roe deer and allergy using the rub test with roe deer's fur. There was a clearly positive urticarial reaction on the patient's skin accompanied by nasal itch, sneezing and rhinorrhea. No reaction was seen in a control person. We surmise that the positive tests with cow epithelium seen in this patient may result from a cross-reactivity to deer allergens. We conclude that although occupational allergies to roe deer seem to be rare, such possibility should be always considered among people having contact with these animals.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Sensitization to horse allergens without apparent exposure to horse. Report of two cases.

    It has been well established that occupational exposure to horses increases the risk of allergic sensitization to horse hair, on the contrary very few data have been published in individuals without direct contact with horses. We describe two cases of severe respiratory symptoms triggered by a single direct exposure in two patients with only 4-5 previous short contacts with horses during the entire their life, since they live in urban area of Naples. Cutaneous and serological diagnostic tests showed significant sensitization to horse dander other than some common inhalant allergens. Our report suggests that, in already (but unaware) horse-sensitized patients, the last direct contact with a horse has triggered severe respiratory symptoms. Passive carriage of horse allergen by the clothes of individuals in contact with horses/horse environments or a cross-reactivity between horse allergen (a lipocalin) and the major allergens (also lipocalins) of several furred animals are likely to explain our findings. Some other considerations can be derived by the clinical observation. First, it is likely that allergic sensitization to horse allergens could be more frequent than expected also in subjects without direct exposure to horse because of living in urban areas. Secondly, individuals suspected to be highly atopic or those already sensitized to some pet dander should be tested by SPTs/radio-allergo-sorbent test before the introduction of a pet indoors or, in the case of a big animal as the horse, a direct horse contact/entering into environments containing a horse.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Exotic pets are new allergenic sources: allergy to iguana.

    Although furry animals are known sources of respiratory allergy, scaly animals are assumed not to be allergenic. Exotic animals such as iguanas are becoming increasingly common pets. Nevertheless, these animals are not suspected to be allergenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma caused by a pet iguana. Clear IgE-sensitization and respiratory allergy to iguana scales is demonstrated, suggesting that scaly pets should be taken into account as possible allergenic sources.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. Occupational respiratory allergy to roe deer.

    BACKGROUND: Although scattered reports have been published on roe deer allergenicity, no systematic studies of allergenicity or possible cross-reactions have appeared. OBJECTIVES: To describe 2 patients with occupational roe deer allergy, demonstrated by positive skin and conjunctival provocation test results, and to note cross-reactions to other animal (mainly cow) allergens. methods: Two workers at animal rehabilitation centers were sensitized to roe deer. One patient had a history of rhinoconjunctivitis and the other a history of rhinoconjunctivitis and probable asthma. Both patients underwent skin testing with a standard battery of inhaled and epithelial allergens and with roe deer hair and dander extract and conjunctival provocation tests with roe deer hair extract. Immunodetection for IgE (both patients) and IgE immunoblot inhibition tests to determine inhibitory effect (1 patient) were also performed. RESULTS: The results of skin tests and conjunctival provocation tests showed that both patients were sensitized to roe deer allergens. In one patient specific IgE to roe deer extract was detected, and this extract completely inhibited IgE binding to cow hair and dander extract in immunoblotting tests. Specific IgE to roe deer proteins could not be demonstrated in the other patient. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that roe deer epidermal derivatives can cause occupational respiratory disease in exposed workers and that allergy to this species should be considered in individuals who present with similar symptoms and exposure histories. Immunoblot inhibition studies suggested the possibility of cross-reaction between roe deer proteins and cow proteins.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Occupational asthma caused by orangutan in a zoo animal handler.

    A zoo animal handler developed bronchial asthma for the first time from handling orangutans (pongo pygmaes). He had prior allergic reactions (rhinoconjunctivitis and urticarial rash), but no asthma, to deer and other hoofed animals in the zoo. In a worksite challenge, immediate and late onset of asthmatic symptoms and airflow obstruction were provoked by carrying a baby orangutan for about 20 minutes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Rhinitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.