Cases reported "Rhinitis"

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1/89. Reversible neuropraxic visual loss induced by allergic aspergillus flavus sinomycosis.

    This work reports a patient with visual loss treated successfully with surgical removal of the aspergillus flavus sinomycosis. Vision was partially reversed within hours after surgery before starting planned corticosteroid therapy. The patient's visual acuity continued to improve steadily until it became equal to that of the other eye. The immediate gain in vision and continued improvement without corticosteroid therapy suggest a new hypothesis for visual loss induced by allergic sinonasal aspergillosis. Simple mechanical pressure alone of the aspergillus mass over the nerve can produce visual loss, and this loss is reversed by removing the mass without corticosteroid therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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2/89. Chronic rhinitis: a manifestation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Chronic rhinitis is a condition that occasionally reflects underlying systemic disease. In such cases, physical examination, nasal endoscopy, and computed tomography may be nonspecific. diagnosis and treatment of the underlying illness may improve nasal symptoms, which may prove refractory to standard rhinitis therapy. A case of chronic rhinitis secondary to nasal involvement of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is presented. biopsy was important in clarifying the cause of the rhinitis. Treatment of the CLL with chlorambucil was successful in alleviating nasal symptoms, and systemic effectiveness was reflected by a decrease in the patient's white cell count. Chronic rhinitis as a manifestation of CLL can be successfully managed through systemic treatment of the underlying disease. biopsy can be helpful in confirming the cause of rhinitis and should be considered in refractory cases of rhinitis.
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ranking = 4
keywords = nasal
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3/89. Inferior concha bullosa--a radiological and clinical rarity.

    Two cases of inferior concha bullosa (ICB) are reported. The condition was bilateral in one patient and unilateral in the other. Unilateral ICB was associated with marked septal deviation. The diagnosis was made in patients being investigated for chronic rhinosinusitis. ICB is diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses in the coronal plane. It may also be seen in axial views.
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ranking = 0.068086427634893
keywords = nose
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4/89. An outbreak of respiratory diseases among workers at a water-damaged building--a case report.

    We describe a military hospital building with severe, repeated and enduring water and mold damage, and the symptoms and diseases found among 14 persons who were employed at the building. The exposure of the employees was evaluated by measuring the serum immunoglobulin g (IgG)-antibodies against eight spieces of mold and yeast common in Finnish water and mold damaged buildings and by sampling airborne viable microbes within the hospital. The most abundant spieces was Sporobolomyces salmonicolor. All but one of the employees reported some building-related symptoms, the most common being a cough which was reported by nine subjects. Four new cases of asthma, confirmed by S. salmonicolor inhalation provocation tests, one of whom was also found to have alveolitis, were found among the hospital personnel. In addition, seven other workers with newly diagnosed rhinitis reacted positively in nasal S. salmonicolor provocation tests. skin prick tests by Sporobolomyces were negative among all 14 workers. Exposure of the workers to mold and yeast in the indoor air caused an outbreak of occupational diseases, including asthma, rhinitis and alveolitis. The diseases were not immunoglobulin e (IgE)-mediated but might have been borne by some other, as yet unexplained, mechanism.
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ranking = 1.0680864276349
keywords = nasal, nose
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5/89. A teenager with an annoying cough.

    Chronic cough is a stressful condition and can lead to extensive investigations. Bronchial asthma and postnasal drip syndrome are common causes, but sometimes the origin of cough is outside the respiratory tract (1,2). Such a relatively simple test as esophageal pH probing may suggest appropriate (antireflux) therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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6/89. acanthamoeba rhinosinusitis: characterization, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Nasal and paranasal sinus manifestations are among the most common presentations of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Several studies cite that as many as 70% of patients with this disease have symptoms referable to the head and neck, including a 30% prevalence of sinusitis. Although the bacteriology of sinusitis in this population is largely considered comparable to that of immunocompetent patients, several opportunistic pathogens have been identified, particularly when T-cell counts are low. This report identifies acanthamoeba as a potentially fatal cause of rhinosinusitis in immunosuppressed patients. The pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare entity will be discussed and the literature reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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7/89. Generalized eczematous reaction to budesonide in a nasal spray with cross-reactivity to triamcinolone.

    A 78-year-old woman suffered a generalized eczematous hypersensitivity reaction following the use of an intranasal budesonide inhaler. Patch testing demonstrated positive reactions to both budesonide and triamcinolone. Her eczema responded to emollients, betamethasone dipropionate ointment and cessation of her intranasal budesonide inhaler.
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ranking = 6
keywords = nasal
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8/89. Wegener's granulomatosis triggered by infection?

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic disease of unknown origin, although recent studies suggest that auto-immune mechanisms and infection play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Wegener is characterized by a necrotizing vasculitis involving the lungs (pulmonary infiltrates), the upper airways and the kidneys (rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis). We present a case of a male patient admitted because of progressive deterioration of the general condition with weight loss, a unilateral neck mass, unilateral purulent rhinorrea and fever. CT-scan evaluation demonstrated a unilateral expanding mass in the sing-nasal cavity, obliterating the ethmoid complex. MRI revealed signs of intracranial inflammatory reaction and onset of absedation. A malignancy was suspected but a diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis was established based on histologic criteria (nasal biopsy) and a positive titer for anti-cytoplasmic antibodies (cANCA). During follow-up, nasal carriage of Staphyloccocus Aureus could be documented. An overview of Wegener's granulomatosis will be provided with emphasis on the potential role of acute infections as a trigger for Wegener's granulomatosis and the head and neck manifestations.
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ranking = 3
keywords = nasal
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9/89. Corticosteroid injections of the nasal turbinates: past experience and precautions.

    Clinical experience with triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog) injections into the nasal turbinates for allergic and vasomotor rhinitis is reported by two authors. Gratifying results have occurred in most of the over 60,000 patients treated, with no serious side effects. Two cases of intravascular injections of another corticosteroid reaching the retinal circulation are reported, and methods for preventing this complication are proposed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nasal
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10/89. Minimally invasive application of botulinum toxin type A in nasal hypersecretion.

    We report on the effect of the local application of botulinum toxin A on nasal hypersecretion in a female patient with intrinsic rhinitis. 20 units of botulinum toxin A (Botox) was inserted into each nostril using a small sponge in close contact with the lower and middle turbinates. The effect was scored by the patient and by rhinomanometry. Nasal hypersecretion diminished clearly 5 days after the treatment. The rhinomanometric flow increased 2 weeks after the application. No side effects occurred. We conclude that this minimal invasive method of local botulinum toxin application might be a very effective and safe option for the treatment of nasal hypersecretion of different etiologies.
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ranking = 6
keywords = nasal
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