Cases reported "Rhinitis"

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1/37. Facial dermatitis, contact urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma induced by potato.

    BACKGROUND: Potato contains multiple heat-labile proteins which can induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis have been described in association with potato exposure. OBJECTIVE: A patient with possible airborne facial dermatitis to potato is described. RESULTS: A middle-aged atopic housewife with pre-existent atopic dermatitis suffered from rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma, and contact urticaria when pealing raw potatoes, but her main complaint was intense, treatment-resistant dermatitis of the face. The investigations showed a positive prick test, a positive patch test, and positive specific serum IgE to raw potato. Potato avoidance led not only to the resolution of the immediate symptoms, but also of the facial dermatitis, suggesting she had dermatitis due to this vegetable. CONCLUSIONS: Potato may induce contact dermatitis with positive immediate and delayed hypersensitivity tests.
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2/37. Occupational allergic rhinitis and contact urticaria caused by bishop's weed (ammi majus).

    Bishop's weed (ammi majus) has been known to induce toxic phytophotodermatitis. We now describe IgE-mediated rhinitis and contact urticaria caused by exposure to bishop's weed in a 31-year-old atopic female florist. A skin prick-prick test with bishop's weed flowers gave an 8-mm wheal, and the bishop's weed-specific IgE level in the patient's serum was 9.7 PRU/ml (RAST class 3). In an immunoblotting experiment with the patient's serum, nine IgE-binding protein bands with the molecular weights 19, 34, 39-41 (doublet), 52-61 (doublet), and >67 (triplet) kDa were detected in bishop's weed extract. The patient became symptomless after she had ceased to work as a florist.
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3/37. Allergy to an occupational allergen (Sapelli wood) in a child.

    The case is presented of a child who developed rhinoconjunctivitis, angioedema and asthma by sensitization to Sapelli wood, which was used in his father's carpentry. Positive skin-prick test, high levels of specific immunoglobulin e by ELISA and a positive conjunctival challenge test suggest a type I hypersensitivity mechanism to this wood. This is the first case report of sensitization to Sapelli wood and it confirms that occupational allergen exposure as Sapelli wood may also cause sensitization in a child.
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4/37. An outbreak of respiratory diseases among workers at a water-damaged building--a case report.

    We describe a military hospital building with severe, repeated and enduring water and mold damage, and the symptoms and diseases found among 14 persons who were employed at the building. The exposure of the employees was evaluated by measuring the serum immunoglobulin g (IgG)-antibodies against eight spieces of mold and yeast common in Finnish water and mold damaged buildings and by sampling airborne viable microbes within the hospital. The most abundant spieces was Sporobolomyces salmonicolor. All but one of the employees reported some building-related symptoms, the most common being a cough which was reported by nine subjects. Four new cases of asthma, confirmed by S. salmonicolor inhalation provocation tests, one of whom was also found to have alveolitis, were found among the hospital personnel. In addition, seven other workers with newly diagnosed rhinitis reacted positively in nasal S. salmonicolor provocation tests. Skin prick tests by Sporobolomyces were negative among all 14 workers. Exposure of the workers to mold and yeast in the indoor air caused an outbreak of occupational diseases, including asthma, rhinitis and alveolitis. The diseases were not immunoglobulin e (IgE)-mediated but might have been borne by some other, as yet unexplained, mechanism.
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5/37. asthma and rhinitis induced by exposure to raw green beans and chards.

    BACKGROUND: Although the vast majority of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods occurs through ingestion, a few cases of unexpected allergic reactions to foods may occur through the exposure to airborne food allergen particles. methods: case reports. Skin prick tests and serum-specific IgE (CAP-FEIA) were used to identify specific IgE antibodies. bronchial provocation tests were performed to determine the clinical relevance of inhaled exposure to raw and cooked green beans and raw chards. After demonstrating specific reactivity to them, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting of raw and cooked green beans were carried out to identify relevant antigens. RESULTS: Three women developed bronchial asthma and rhinitis after exposure to raw green beans, and one of them also when exposed to raw chards. All women tolerated ingestion of green beans. patients reported multiple episodes while handling these vegetables for cooking activities. Allergy to green beans and chards was demonstrated by skin testing and serum-specific IgE. Bronchial challenge test with these allergens showed positive responses to raw, but not cooked, green beans and chards. Oral food challenges with green beans (raw and cooked) and chards were negative in all patients. In order to further characterize the allergenic components of these extracts, SDS-PAGE and electroblotting studies were also performed. Immunoblots of raw and cooked green beans extract showed two IgE-binding bands with apparent molecular weights of 41.1 and 70.6 kD. Interestingly, a 47-kD IgE-binding protein was detected only in raw green bean extracts. CONCLUSIONS: We report three patients who developed asthma and rhinitis caused by exposure to raw, but not to cooked, green beans and chards in a non-occupational environment. Only minor differences of IgE reactivity between nitrocellulose-blotted raw and boiled green bean extract were found.
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6/37. Opiate-sensitivity: clinical characteristics and the role of skin prick testing.

    BACKGROUND: The value of skin prick testing in opiate-sensitive individuals is uncertain as opiates cause non-specific weals by direct degranulation of mast cells. OBJECTIVE: To define whether skin prick test (SPT) responses to opiates in opiate-sensitive individuals are different to those seen in the normal population and to describe the clinical characteristics of this group of subjects. methods: The SPT responses of eight opiate-sensitive subjects to morphine 10 mg/mL, pethidine (meperidine) 50 mg/mL and papaveretum 15.4 mg/mL at four different concentrations (undiluted, 1/10, 1/50 and 1/100) were compared with the responses of 100 (32 atopic) non-opiate-sensitive control subjects. Four of the opiate-sensitive subjects had a clinical history of asthma, rhinitis or urticaria on occupational exposure to morphine. One subject developed urticaria with codeine, one developed urticaria and asthma with morphine and diamorphine and two subjects reacted to intravenous papaveretum with anaphylaxis or urticaria. Five out of the eight cases had opiate sensitivity confirmed by single-blind placebo-controlled oral challenge. RESULTS: Skin prick tests to all three opiates were not significantly different when the eight opiate-sensitive subjects were compared with either the entire normal control group or the subgroup of 47 definite opiate-tolerant controls that had previously received opiates for clinical indications. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in size of opiate SPT responses between atopic and non-atopic control subjects. In the control subjects, there was a positive correlation in SPT weal size between the three opiates. CONCLUSION: Skin prick testing is not useful in the diagnosis of opiate sensitivity and placebo-controlled challenge should be considered.
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ranking = 67.049195031808
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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7/37. Occupational contact urticaria caused by airborne methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride.

    Acid anhydrides are low-molecular weight chemicals known to cause respiratory irritancy and allergy. Skin allergy has on rare occasions been reported. A total of 3 subjects with occupational exposure to methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) from an epoxy resin system were studied to evaluate the nature of their reported skin and nose complaints (work-related anamnesis, specific IgE, contact urticaria examinations, and ambient monitoring). Using a Pharmacia CAP system with a HHPA human serum albumin conjugate, specific IgE antibody was detected in serum from 1 (33.3%) out of the 3 workers. One unsensitized worker displayed nasal pain and rhinorrhea only when loading liquid epoxy resins into the pouring-machine (2.2 mg MHHPA/m3 and 1.2 mg HHPA/m3), probably being an irritant reaction. Two workers had work-related symptoms at relatively low levels of exposure (geometric mean 32-103 microg MHHPA/m3 and 18-59 microg HHPA/m3); one complained of only rhinitis, and the other was sensitized against HHPA and displayed both rhinitis and contact urticaria (the face and neck). The worker's skin symptoms were evidently due to airborne contact, since she had not had any skin contact with liquid epoxy resin or mixtures of MHHPA and HHPA. These urticaria symptoms were confirmed by a 20-min closed patch test for MHHPA, but not by that for HHPA. The causative agent was considered to be MHHPA, although the specific IgE determination to MHHPA was not performed.
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ranking = 68.049195031808
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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8/37. Allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis to roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in a hunter.

    Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) is one of the most common game mammals in europe, where hundreds of thousands people are exposed to this animal. Despite this fact, we are aware of only two cases of allergy to roe deer published until recently, one case of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and the second of contact urticaria. We describe another case with co-existing allergic contact urticaria and rhinitis in a 55-year old male professional hunter. The symptoms were provoked only by exposure to roe deer, and there were no other past or present allergic diseases. Specific IgE was found to following animal allergens: cow dander (CAP class 5), goat epithelium and horse dander (each CAP class 4), dog epithelium, dog dander and swine epithelium (each CAP class 2). Skin prick tests have shown positive reaction only to cow epithelium ( ). Because of lack of deer dander allergen for specific IgE and skin tests, we have confirmed the causal relationship between exposure to roe deer and allergy using the rub test with roe deer's fur. There was a clearly positive urticarial reaction on the patient's skin accompanied by nasal itch, sneezing and rhinorrhea. No reaction was seen in a control person. We surmise that the positive tests with cow epithelium seen in this patient may result from a cross-reactivity to deer allergens. We conclude that although occupational allergies to roe deer seem to be rare, such possibility should be always considered among people having contact with these animals.
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9/37. Occupational rhinitis and bronchial asthma due to artichoke (cynara scolymus).

    BACKGROUND: The artichoke is a perennial horticultural plant that belongs to the Compositae family. OBJECTIVE: To present case studies of 2 vegetable warehouse workers who developed occupational rhinitis and bronchial asthma by sensitization to artichoke. methods: Skin prick tests with common inhalants and foods were performed. Specific IgE to artichoke, parietaria judaica pollen, and olea europaea pollen extracts was measured by a specific IgE enzyme immunosorbent assay kit. Molecular mass of the allergens was studied by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) immunoblotting technique. patients underwent a nasal challenge test, and one patient provided peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements in her workplace. RESULTS: In both patients, results of skin prick tests to artichoke were positive. Levels of specific IgE for artichoke were 0.68 kU/L in patient 1 and 2.14 kU/L in patient 2. The protein composition of the artichoke extract, studied by SDS-PAGE, showed that most bands ranged from 30 to 14 kDa. The IgE-binding bands with the serum samples of patient 1 showed apparent molecular masses of 56, 48, 38, 31, 27, 25, 16, and 15 kDa; however, the serum samples of patient 2 showed IgE bands of 21 and 19 kDa. Western blotting of artichoke extract showed a complete inhibition of IgE-binding bands when serum samples were preincubated with P. judaica pollen extract. Nasal challenge with artichoke extract triggered a peak nasal inspiratory flow decrease of 81% and 85% in patient 1 and patient 2, respectively. Finally, patient 1 recorded a PEFR decrease of up to 36% after exposure to artichoke in her workplace. CONCLUSIONS: SDS-PAGE immunoblotting inhibition performed for the artichoke extract showed a total disappearance of the specific IgE binding bands when serum samples were previously incubated with P. judaica pollen extract, thus establishing the existence of a serologic cross-reactivity between artichoke and P. judaica pollen.
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10/37. health effects of diazinon on a family.

    There is increasing evidence of permanent sequalae from acute organophosphate poisoning. We report on accidental diazinon overexposure with acute organophosphate poisoning through cutaneous absorption and inhalation followed by persistent neurological effects. In addition, we observed skeletal and endocrine effects likely attributable to the diazinon poisoning. A family of seven was exposed to diazinon in June 1999 over a two-day period. The pesticide company mistakenly used diazinon to heavily spray the inside of the home instead of permethrin. The applicator applied the pesticide over the entire surface of the floor, carpeting, furniture, and clothing in closets to eradicate an infestation of fleas. Acute symptoms in the family members included headaches, nausea, skin irritation, runny nose, and vomiting. The family was first evaluated at 3 months and then 3 years after the acute poisoning. There were persisting neurological symptoms of memory loss, decreased concentration, irritability, and personality changes of varying degrees in all family members. Objective neurological findings of impaired balance, reaction time, color vision, slotted pegboards and trials making were present in the three older children who could be tested. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed evidence of organic brain dysfunction in all seven family members. Bone growth difficulties are present in four of five children. One child has delayed menarche.
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