Cases reported "Rhinosporidiosis"

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1/36. rhinosporidiosis presenting with two soft tissue tumors followed by dissemination.

    rhinosporidiosis is caused by rhinosporidium seeberi. Most mycologists believe that R. seeberi is either a Chytridium related to the Olpidiaceae (order Chytridialis, class Chytridiomycetes) or a Synchytrium. This is the first documented case of tumoral rhinosporidiosis in a Sri Lankan and the third documented case in the world literature. A 44 year old male presented with a large mass above the thigh and a similar mass over the anterior chest wall, both masses contained R. seeberi. Later examination of the patient revealed nasal polyps, confirming that the tumors were due to systemic spread of this infection.
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keywords = nasal
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2/36. rhinosporidiosis and peripheral keratitis.

    Report of a case of peripheral keratitis caused by rhinosporidium seeberi. The patient was seen in a referral practice. Corneal scraping was performed on a middle-aged female patient presenting with peripheral keratitis and progressive nasal obstruction that revealed spores suggestive of rhinosporidiosis. The patient was started on topical amphotericin b 0.15% eye drops. ear, nose, and throat (ENT) examination showed presence of a polypoid lesion in the left nostril for which a polypectomy was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed rhinosporidiosis. Complete resolution of the keratitis was observed. Topical amphotericin b is an effective drug in the management of this condition. keratitis secondary to rhinosporidial infection has not been described although occasional patients with limbal and scleral involvement have been reported. Corneal scraping was effective in helping us make a tentative diagnosis.
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ranking = 1.4938027902202
keywords = nasal, nose
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3/36. rhinosporidiosis of the parotid duct cyst: cytomorphological diagnosis of an unusual extranasal presentation.

    This cytology report highlights a case of rhinosporidiosis of the parotid duct cyst not associated with nasal manifestations. In an endemic area, one should be familiar with its morphologic features in fine-needle aspiration cytology even on scanty material, for it could be one of the investigations in the initial workup of a case.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nasal
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4/36. rhinosporidiosis.

    A case of nasal rhinosporidiosis occurred in a 73-year-old man who has lived all his life in the united states. The lesion was treated surgically, and he remains free of disease four years later.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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5/36. rhinosporidiosis presenting as recurrent nasal polyps.

    rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of the mucous membrane, predominantly of the nose and nasopharynx. It is uncommon in malaysia but has been seen in immigrant workers from endemic areas like india and sri lanka. A case seen in Johor is reported here to highlight the need of awareness among clinicians at a time where there is increasing numbers of immigrant workers in our country. The causative organism of this disease is rhinosporidium seeberi, which is found in stagnant waters. sporangia and endospores of R. seeberi are seen in the granulomatous polypoidal lesions. The patients commonly present with epistaxis and nasal blockage. Complete excision is the treatment of choice for this disease. Recurrences are common despite anti-microbial treatment.
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ranking = 5.4938027902202
keywords = nasal, nose
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6/36. rhinosporidiosis: an unusual cause of nasal masses gains prominence.

    INTRODUCTION: rhinosporidiosis is a rare cause of nasal masses locally, with only two cases reported over a 35-year period. methods: Four patients with rhinosporidiosis, all from the Indian subcontinent, were managed at our tertiary referral centre over a recent five-year period. They presented with nasal masses and the diagnosis was confirmed by histological examination. RESULTS: All patients were treated by local excision of the nasal masses, and two also received dapsone therapy after surgery. During follow-up, local recurrence was found in two patients, one of whom had received dapsone. CONCLUSION: With a significant number of foreign workers from endemic regions, this uncommon disease may be observed more frequently in the future. It is thus important to consider the diagnosis of rhinosporidiosis in patients from endemic regions presenting with nasal masses. The mainstay of treatment should be wide surgical excision.
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ranking = 8
keywords = nasal
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7/36. Conjunctival rhinosporidiosis.

    Conjunctival rhinosporidiosis is usually a surprise diagnosis in histological section of an excised conjunctival mass. The condition is rarely encountered outside the endemic coastal areas of South india. Accurate diagnosis of this rare condition is infrequent in clinical practice; tumour, neoplasm, papilloma being the common misdiagnoses. Herein, a report of a case of an 18-year-old otherwise healthy male who attended outpatient department of Regional Institute of ophthalmology, Medical College, Kolkata with a red fleshy papillomatous growth about 7 mm x 4 mm in size, in the palpebral conjunctiva just behind the intermarginal strip of his right upper lid. His routine blood examination was within normal limits. The growth was excised under local anaesthesia and histopathological examination revealed rhinosporidiosis. There was no recurrence of the growth within one month of follow-up.
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ranking = 0.49380279022022
keywords = nose
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8/36. Laryngeal rhinosporidiosis: report of a rare case.

    Extranasal manifestations of rhinosporidiosis are relatively uncommon. Laryngeal involvement is extremely rare, as only 3 cases have been previously reported. We describe a new case, which occurred in a patient with coexisting nasal rhinosporidiosis who presented with inspiratory stridor. Both lesions were completely excised under general anesthesia without the need for preliminary tracheostomy.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nasal
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9/36. Lacrimal sac rhinosporidiosis: a case report.

    rhinosporidiosis is a disease caused by rhinosporidium seeberi. It usually affects the nasal mucosa and rarely the conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, tonsils, and skin. We present a case study of an isolated lacrimal sac rhinosporidiosis in an 8-year-old girl who was a migrant from Orissa, an Eastern coastal state of india. The mode of presentation and management of this case with a review of literature is discussed in brief.
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keywords = nasal
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10/36. Disseminated cutaneous rhinosporidiosis.

    rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disorder caused by rhinosporidium seeberi. It frequently involves the nasopharynx and occasionally affects the skin. We herewith report a 55-year-old man who has disseminated cutaneous rhinosporidiosis. He presents with multiple reddish lesions over the nose of 10 year's duration. In the past year, he develops skin lesions over the right arm and over back. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen from the representative cutaneous lesions shows hyperplastic epithelium with numerous globular cysts of varying shape, representing sporangia in different stages of development. His serology for hiv infection by ELISA is negative. On the basis of these clinical and histopathological findings, a diagnosis of nasal rhinosporidiosis with cutaneous dissemination is made.
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ranking = 1.4938027902202
keywords = nasal, nose
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