Cases reported "Rickettsia Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/49. Japanese spotted fever involving the central nervous system: two case reports and a literature review.

    Japanese spotted fever (JSF), first reported in 1984, is a rickettsial disease caused by Rickettsia japonica. Until now, affliction of the central nervous system has been rarely reported. Here we report two cases of JSF associated with a central nervous system disorder such as meningoencephalitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/49. Fulminant Japanese spotted fever definitively diagnosed by the polymerase chain reaction method.

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to the emergency ward in our hospital on July 20, 2001, because of consciousness disturbance, fever, generalized skin eruption, and severe general weakness beginning 7 days previously. physical examination on admission revealed marked systemic cyanosis, erythema, and purpura. Laboratory findings indicated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and multiorgan failure (platelet count, 0.9 x 10(4)/micro l; fibrin degradation product, 110 micro g/ml; c-reactive protein, 22.6 mg/dl). Soluble interleukin 2-receptor (sIL-2R) was markedly increased to 14 710 U/ml. blood gas analysis demonstrated severe metabolic acidosis. He was diagnosed with multiorgan failure due to DIC. Administration of heparin and sodium bicarbonate was started immediately, but respiratory failure was exacerbated and systemic spasm caused by encephalitis was noted. Although he was supported by an artificial ventilator, deterioration of metabolic acidosis occurred, and the blood pressure decreased to less than 60 mm Hg. He died 5.5 h after admission. The serological test showed no positive antibody titers against orientia tsutsugamushi, Rickettsia japonica, or rickettsia typhi. However, a specific dna band derived from R. japonica was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using a primer from a blood clot. Therefore, he was definitively diagnosed as having Japanese spotted fever. The PCR method may be markedly useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis of Japanese spotted fever during the critical stage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2001113028855
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/49. African tick bite fever: not a spotless rickettsiosis!

    African tick bite fever is caused by Rickettsia africae, a newly recognized species from south africa. We report the case of a patient with an unusual site of a tick bite and discuss cutaneous differences from other spotted fevers that may help dermatologists with clinical diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.20055651442728
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/49. Spotted fever in hong kong.

    A previously healthy 7-year-old hong kong-born Caucasian child developed sudden onset fever, followed by a generalized rash and systemic symptoms of rigor and prostration, mucous membrane involvement (conjunctivitis) and arthralgia. He lives in a rural area of hong kong and has been in contact with various domestic animals--rodents, dogs and cows. chloramphenicol 50 mg/kg/day was given on day 4 with rapid response. Subsequent Weil-Felix test and specific serology suggested the diagnosis of rickettsial infection of the spotted fever group. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed case of spotted fever reported in hong kong.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.40055651442728
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/49. Rickettsia parkeri: a newly recognized cause of spotted fever rickettsiosis in the united states.

    ticks, including many that bite humans, are hosts to several obligate intracellular bacteria in the spotted fever group (SFG) of the genus Rickettsia. Only rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of rocky mountain spotted fever, has been definitively associated with disease in humans in the united states. Herein we describe disease in a human caused by Rickettsia parkeri, an SFG rickettsia first identified >60 years ago in Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected from the southern united states. Confirmation of the infection was accomplished using serological testing, immunohistochemical staining, cell culture isolation, and molecular methods. Application of specific laboratory assays to clinical specimens obtained from patients with febrile, eschar-associated illnesses following a tick bite may identify additional cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis and possibly other novel SFG rickettsioses in the united states.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/49. Rickettsia mongolotimonae infection in south africa.

    We report the first laboratory-confirmed case of Rickettsia mongolotimonae infection in Africa. The patient sought treatment for an eschar on his toe; lymphangitis, severe headaches, and fever subsequently developed. After a regimen of doxycycline, symptoms rapidly resolved. R. mongolotimonae infection was diagnosed retrospectively by serologic tests and molecular-based detection of the organism in biopsy specimens of eschar material.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00011130288545678
keywords = fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/49. Fatal spotted fever rickettsiosis, kenya.

    We report a fatal case of rickettsiosis in a woman from the united states living in kenya, who had a history of tick exposure. Immunohistochemical staining of skin, kidney, and liver demonstrated spotted fever group rickettsiae. The clinical findings, severity, and fatal outcome are most consistent with rickettsia conorii infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/49. African tick-bite fever: four cases among Swiss travelers returning from south africa.

    BACKGROUND: African tick-bite fever (ATBF) is a recently described disease belonging to the spotted fever group. It is caused by Rickettsia africae, and cases are mainly diagnosed in travelers returning from sub-Saharan Africa. methods: We report four cases of ATBF among Swiss travelers returning from a 1-month trip in rural south africa. diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical, epidemiologic and serologic findings that we describe in detail. serology was performed using microimmunofluorescence (MIF) assay 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 14 months after the commencement of symptoms. RESULTS: All patients developed the typical eschar and a rash; two had a local lymphadenopathy and one a lymphangitic reaction. Two patients developed transient neuropsychiatric symptoms such as headache, irritability and depressed mood. All four patients had rises in both IgM and IgG classes of anti-R. africae antibodies. After 1 year, only two patients still had measurable circulating antibodies. Cross-reactions with R. conorii were noted. Three patients were cured after a short course of doxycycline; one required 15 days of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: ATBF is a benign disease increasingly being diagnosed in travelers. After ruling out malaria, ATBF diagnosis relies upon a detailed travel history and the classical findings of influenza-like symptoms, fever, one or more necrotic eschars, and rash. serologic tests usually help to confirm the diagnosis. Neuropsychiatric symptoms specifically associated with ATBF are reported here for the first time.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.20066781731274
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/49. Concomitant or consecutive infection with coxiella burnetii and tickborne diseases.

    BACKGROUND: q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by coxiella burnetii, which can be isolated from ticks. Reports of people with both q fever and other tickborne diseases are rare. In this study, we describe 6 patients with q fever who were infected with 1 of the following tickborne pathogens: rickettsia conorii (2 patients), Rickettsia slovaca (2), Rickettsia africae (1), and francisella tularensis (1). methods: Diagnoses were made on the basis of results of microimmunofluorescence assays for detection of C. burnetii, R. conorii, R. slovaca, R. africae, and F. tularensis antigens. Cross-adsorption studies and Western blots were used to confirm dual infections. RESULTS: Among the 6 cases presented, 3 were probably due to a concomitant infection after a tick bite, whereas the remaining 3 were more likely consecutive infections. CONCLUSIONS: Because acute q fever is often asymptomatic, we recommend that patients infected with the tickborne pathogens mentioned above also undergo routine testing for concurrent infections with C. burnetii.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00044521154182712
keywords = fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/49. A new focus of Rickettsia honei spotted fever in south australia.

    We recently diagnosed rickettsial spotted fever in four patients from the south-eastern coastal region of south australia near Adelaide, an area not known to be endemic for this infection. All infections were acquired within the geographic range of Aponomma hydrosauri, the tick vector of Rickettsia honei. infection by R. honei was confirmed in two patients. This extension of the known geographic range of R. honei infection may be explained, in part, by alterations in host-parasite ecology.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = spotted fever, fever
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Rickettsia Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.