Cases reported "Rickettsia Infections"

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1/28. Imported African tick bite fever: a case report.

    We describe a patient with African tick-bite fever who acquired his infection while visiting rural areas of south africa and then became sick after returning to the united states. The dominant clinical feature of his illness was the presence of multiple, ulcerated lesions (tache noires). physicians in the United States and other non-African countries who see travelers returning from southern parts of Africa who give a history of recent tick bite and/or present with multiple, crusted or vesicular skin lesions should be alert to this diagnosis and institute treatment with doxycycline.
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keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
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2/28. African tick-bite fever imported into norway: presentation of 8 cases.

    We report on 8 Norwegian travellers to Southern Africa with African tick-bite fever (ATBF), a recently described spotted fever group rickettsiosis. All patients had acute flu-like symptoms and developed I or multiple inoculation eschars. The patients were treated with either doxycycline or ciprofloxacin, and all recovered. The diagnosis of ATBF was confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies to Rickettsia africae by microimmunofluoroscence in convalescent-phase serum samples.
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ranking = 0.098402839638235
keywords = tick, bite
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3/28. association of Rickettsia helvetica with chronic perimyocarditis in sudden cardiac death.

    BACKGROUND: Rickettsia helvetica is the only non-imported rickettsia found in scandinavia. It was first detected in ixodes ricinus ticks, but has never been linked to human disease. We studied two young Swedish men who died of sudden cardiac failure during exercise, and who showed signs of perimyocarditis similar to those described in rickettsial disease. methods: Samples from the heart and other organs were analysed by PCR and dna sequencing. May-Grunwald-Giemsa, Grocott, and acridine-orange stains were used for histopathological examinations. Staining of R. helvetica grown on shell-vials in vero cells, and the early descriptions of R. rickettsii by H T Ricketts and S B Wohlbach served as controls. immunohistochemistry was done with proteus OX-19 rabbit antisera as the primary antibody. The structure of rickettsia-like organisms was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Serological analyses were carried out by indirect immunofluorescence with R. helvetica as the antigen. FINDINGS: By use of a semi-nested PCR, with primers specific for the 16S rRNA and 17-kDa outer-membrane-protein genes, and sequence analysis of the amplified products, genetic material from R. helvetica was detected in the pericardium and in a lymph node from the pulmonary hilum in case 1, and in a coronary artery and the heart muscle in case 2. A serological response in case 1 revealed an endpoint titre for R. helvetica of 1/320 (1/256 with R. rickettsii as the antigen). Examination of PCR-positive tissue showed chronic interstitial inflammation and the presence of rickettsia-like organisms predominantly located in the endothelium. These organisms reacted with proteus OX-19 antisera, and their size and form were consistent with rickettsia. Electron microscopy confirmed that the appearance of the organisms was similar to that described for spotted-fever rickettsia. INTERPRETATION: R. helvetica, transmitted by I. ricinus ticks, may be an important pathogen in the aetiology of perimyocarditis, which can result in sudden unexpected cardiac death in young people.
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ranking = 0.038815739249394
keywords = tick
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4/28. Evidence of Rickettsia helvetica infection in humans, eastern france.

    A 37-year-old man living in eastern france seroconverted to Rickettsia helvetica in August 1997, 4 weeks after the onset of an unexplained febrile illness. Results of a serosurvey of forest workers from the area where the patient lived showed a 9.2% seroprevalence against R. helvetica. This organism may pose a threat for populations exposed to ixodes ricinus ticks.
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ranking = 0.019407869624697
keywords = tick
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5/28. Outbreak of African tick-bite fever in six Italian tourists returning from South Africa.

    In May 1999, a cluster of cases of African tick-bite fever was detected in six Italian tourists who had returned from south africa. All of the patients had moderate fever and cutaneous eschars. Regional lymphangitis was observed in three of the patients and skin rash in two. By comparing the number of eschars with the number of detectable bite sites it was suggested that at least two-thirds of the biting vectors were capable of transmitting Rickettsia africae. The clinical course of disease was mild in all cases, and all but one of the patients recovered spontaneously before antibiotic treatment was initiated. The diagnosis of African tick-bite fever was confirmed serologically using both microimmunofluorescence and Western blot tests.
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ranking = 0.11835610586883
keywords = tick, bite
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6/28. African tick bite fever: not a spotless rickettsiosis!

    African tick bite fever is caused by Rickettsia africae, a newly recognized species from south africa. We report the case of a patient with an unusual site of a tick bite and discuss cutaneous differences from other spotted fevers that may help dermatologists with clinical diagnosis.
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ranking = 1.1763833184868
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
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7/28. Rickettsia parkeri: a newly recognized cause of spotted fever rickettsiosis in the united states.

    ticks, including many that bite humans, are hosts to several obligate intracellular bacteria in the spotted fever group (SFG) of the genus Rickettsia. Only rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of rocky mountain spotted fever, has been definitively associated with disease in humans in the united states. Herein we describe disease in a human caused by Rickettsia parkeri, an SFG rickettsia first identified >60 years ago in Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected from the southern united states. Confirmation of the infection was accomplished using serological testing, immunohistochemical staining, cell culture isolation, and molecular methods. Application of specific laboratory assays to clinical specimens obtained from patients with febrile, eschar-associated illnesses following a tick bite may identify additional cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis and possibly other novel SFG rickettsioses in the united states.
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ranking = 0.21574445434212
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
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8/28. Fatal spotted fever rickettsiosis, kenya.

    We report a fatal case of rickettsiosis in a woman from the united states living in kenya, who had a history of tick exposure. Immunohistochemical staining of skin, kidney, and liver demonstrated spotted fever group rickettsiae. The clinical findings, severity, and fatal outcome are most consistent with rickettsia conorii infection.
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ranking = 0.019407869624697
keywords = tick
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9/28. African tick-bite fever: four cases among Swiss travelers returning from south africa.

    BACKGROUND: African tick-bite fever (ATBF) is a recently described disease belonging to the spotted fever group. It is caused by Rickettsia africae, and cases are mainly diagnosed in travelers returning from sub-Saharan Africa. methods: We report four cases of ATBF among Swiss travelers returning from a 1-month trip in rural south africa. diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical, epidemiologic and serologic findings that we describe in detail. serology was performed using microimmunofluorescence (MIF) assay 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 14 months after the commencement of symptoms. RESULTS: All patients developed the typical eschar and a rash; two had a local lymphadenopathy and one a lymphangitic reaction. Two patients developed transient neuropsychiatric symptoms such as headache, irritability and depressed mood. All four patients had rises in both IgM and IgG classes of anti-R. africae antibodies. After 1 year, only two patients still had measurable circulating antibodies. Cross-reactions with R. conorii were noted. Three patients were cured after a short course of doxycycline; one required 15 days of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: ATBF is a benign disease increasingly being diagnosed in travelers. After ruling out malaria, ATBF diagnosis relies upon a detailed travel history and the classical findings of influenza-like symptoms, fever, one or more necrotic eschars, and rash. serologic tests usually help to confirm the diagnosis. Neuropsychiatric symptoms specifically associated with ATBF are reported here for the first time.
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ranking = 0.098402839638235
keywords = tick, bite
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10/28. Concomitant or consecutive infection with coxiella burnetii and tickborne diseases.

    BACKGROUND: q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by coxiella burnetii, which can be isolated from ticks. Reports of people with both q fever and other tickborne diseases are rare. In this study, we describe 6 patients with q fever who were infected with 1 of the following tickborne pathogens: rickettsia conorii (2 patients), Rickettsia slovaca (2), Rickettsia africae (1), and francisella tularensis (1). methods: Diagnoses were made on the basis of results of microimmunofluorescence assays for detection of C. burnetii, R. conorii, R. slovaca, R. africae, and F. tularensis antigens. Cross-adsorption studies and Western blots were used to confirm dual infections. RESULTS: Among the 6 cases presented, 3 were probably due to a concomitant infection after a tick bite, whereas the remaining 3 were more likely consecutive infections. CONCLUSIONS: Because acute q fever is often asymptomatic, we recommend that patients infected with the tickborne pathogens mentioned above also undergo routine testing for concurrent infections with C. burnetii.
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ranking = 0.35132684341205
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
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